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Lynne Truss

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April 19, 2004 | Beth Gardiner, Associated Press
Lynne Truss fears the English language could be in its death throes. Proper, written English, that is -- the kind with correctly placed apostrophes, elegantly positioned semicolons, commas in all the right places and in none of the wrong ones. It's being shoved aside, she thinks, by an electronic onslaught of uncapitalized, unpunctuated, ill-thought-out Internet verbiage.
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BOOKS
December 11, 2005 | Patt Morrison, Patt Morrison, an Op-Ed columnist for The Times, is the author of "Rio L.A.: Tales From the Los Angeles River."
THIS being December, consider some shopping advice: If you loved Lynne Truss' bestselling "Eats, Shoots & Leaves," a joyous catnip wallow in other people's ignorance of grammar, spelling and syntax, you might be disposed to order up her latest book in automatic multiples and make it your signature gift of the season. Not ... so ... fast. It might be like giving a can of deodorant.
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BOOKS
June 27, 2004 | John Rechy, John Rechy is the author, most recently, of "The Life and Adventures of Lyle Clemens" and the forthcoming collection of essays "Beneath the Skin."
Not everything has gone haywire in a world that converts this haughtily subtitled book -- "The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation" -- into a bestseller. (I'll leave it to the reader to discover the meaning of the title, "Eats, Shoots & Leaves.") First in England, now in America, it has perched, proud and aloof, atop massive tomes about war, spies and lying presidents. Witty, smart, passionate, it gives long-overdue attention to "the traffic signals of language."
BOOKS
June 27, 2004 | John Rechy, John Rechy is the author, most recently, of "The Life and Adventures of Lyle Clemens" and the forthcoming collection of essays "Beneath the Skin."
Not everything has gone haywire in a world that converts this haughtily subtitled book -- "The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation" -- into a bestseller. (I'll leave it to the reader to discover the meaning of the title, "Eats, Shoots & Leaves.") First in England, now in America, it has perched, proud and aloof, atop massive tomes about war, spies and lying presidents. Witty, smart, passionate, it gives long-overdue attention to "the traffic signals of language."
BOOKS
December 11, 2005 | Patt Morrison, Patt Morrison, an Op-Ed columnist for The Times, is the author of "Rio L.A.: Tales From the Los Angeles River."
THIS being December, consider some shopping advice: If you loved Lynne Truss' bestselling "Eats, Shoots & Leaves," a joyous catnip wallow in other people's ignorance of grammar, spelling and syntax, you might be disposed to order up her latest book in automatic multiples and make it your signature gift of the season. Not ... so ... fast. It might be like giving a can of deodorant.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2004 | From Associated Press
A book about punctuation, an unlikely bestseller in any year, won the top prize at the British Book Awards ceremonies. "Eats, Shoots & Leaves," a lighthearted look at the pitfalls of apostrophes and rampant commas, won the book of the year award for author Lynne Truss. Alexander McCall Smith, author of a series of popular books about the "No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency," was named author of the year in ceremonies Wednesday.
BOOKS
June 18, 2006
Rankings are based on a Times poll of Southland bookstores. *--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction 1 Snow Flower and the Secret Fan by Lisa See (Random House: $13.95) Two women in 19th century China. 2 The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown (Anchor: $7.99) A Louvre curator's killing leads to a secret society. 3 The History of Love by Nicole Krauss (W.W. Norton: $13.95) A writer escapes the Nazis but loses his beloved. 4 Angels & Demons by Dan Brown (Pocket: $7.
SPORTS
April 12, 1999 | LISA DILLMAN
Following Tiger Woods on the opening day of the Masters was so exhausting, that columnist Lynne Truss of the Times of London had to, well, depend upon the kindness of strangers: "It was also so hot by now that usually well-organized people, who had stupidly left all their money in the pressroom [I mean me], were forgetting to be Blanche Dubois any more and just begging at the concession stands for a bit of ice to suck on. ". . .
BOOKS
February 13, 2005
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction LAST WEEK WEEKS ON LIST *--* *--* 1 The Broker by John Grisham (Doubleday: $27.95) A 1 4 high-roller attorney is pardoned to lead the CIA to a powerful satellite surveillance system and the shadowy agents who want to buy it. 2 The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown (Doubleday: $24.95) A 2 98 Louvre curator's killing leads to clues hidden in Leonardo's paintings and a secret society with something to hide. 3 State of Fear by Michael Crichton (HarperCollins: $27.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2004 | Beth Gardiner, Associated Press
Lynne Truss fears the English language could be in its death throes. Proper, written English, that is -- the kind with correctly placed apostrophes, elegantly positioned semicolons, commas in all the right places and in none of the wrong ones. It's being shoved aside, she thinks, by an electronic onslaught of uncapitalized, unpunctuated, ill-thought-out Internet verbiage.
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