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Lynne V Cheney

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NEWS
December 3, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lynne V. Cheney will resign as head of the National Endowment for the Humanities, where she has defended traditional college scholarship against charges that it is out of touch with America. In a letter to her staff, Cheney said she will step down when President-elect Bill Clinton takes office. She said she will visit students and scholars around the country and spend time in Wyoming, where she and her husband, outgoing Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, have a home.
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NATIONAL
November 1, 2004 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
Lynne Cheney responded angrily when Sen. John F. Kerry mentioned her lesbian daughter in his final debate with President Bush. But an aide suggested it was all in good fun Sunday when she referred to her granddaughter to criticize the Democratic presidential candidate's healthcare plan. Vice President Dick Cheney and his wife were joined here on the campaign trail by their three grandchildren, who were wearing Halloween costumes.
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NEWS
October 23, 1995 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time I finished this book my ears hurt. Lynne Cheney yells at the top of her lungs from the first page to the last. I don't know how persuasive this technique will be with most readers. It rather put this one off. It is not that her subjects are not deserving of comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | From Associated Press
Lynne Cheney, wife of Vice President Cheney, has established a charitable fund that will finance an annual award for the best work of history written for young people. The James Madison Book Award will have a $10,000 prize and is meant to encourage more work in this genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Humanities Endowment Head Reappointed: President Bush announced that he has nominated Lynne V. Cheney, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, for reappointment to another four-year term. Cheney, 48, was first named to the post by former President Ronald Reagan in May, 1986. Her appointment requires reconfirmation by the Senate. Cheney is the wife of Defense Secretary Dick Cheney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1991 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Lynne V. Cheney, chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, had to step up onto a box so she could reach the microphone in front of her, she at first described herself as "short." Then she offered this tongue-in-cheek apology: "We don't say 'short'--we say 'vertically challenged.'
NATIONAL
November 1, 2004 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
Lynne Cheney responded angrily when Sen. John F. Kerry mentioned her lesbian daughter in his final debate with President Bush. But an aide suggested it was all in good fun Sunday when she referred to her granddaughter to criticize the Democratic presidential candidate's healthcare plan. Vice President Dick Cheney and his wife were joined here on the campaign trail by their three grandchildren, who were wearing Halloween costumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | From Associated Press
Lynne Cheney, wife of Vice President Cheney, has established a charitable fund that will finance an annual award for the best work of history written for young people. The James Madison Book Award will have a $10,000 prize and is meant to encourage more work in this genre.
OPINION
May 13, 1990 | Sarah Fritz, Sarah Fritz is a special-projects reporter at The Times' Washington Bureau. She interviewed Cheney at the endowment's offices
As chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Lynne V. Cheney preaches a doctrine that many of today's educators view as too conservative and outmoded. But like her husband, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, she does not shrink from controversy. She is a thoughtful, self-assured and strong-minded woman.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
One year after becoming chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Lynne V. Cheney is on the move. Now that flak over her removal of the endowment's name from the credits of PBS' controversial series "The Africans" is behind her--"it's gone, thank goodness"--she is focusing on what has become, to hear her talk, a beloved priority: putting the humanities back into the educational limelight. As she told the 1987 winners of the U.S.
NEWS
October 23, 1995 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time I finished this book my ears hurt. Lynne Cheney yells at the top of her lungs from the first page to the last. I don't know how persuasive this technique will be with most readers. It rather put this one off. It is not that her subjects are not deserving of comment.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lynne V. Cheney will resign as head of the National Endowment for the Humanities, where she has defended traditional college scholarship against charges that it is out of touch with America. In a letter to her staff, Cheney said she will step down when President-elect Bill Clinton takes office. She said she will visit students and scholars around the country and spend time in Wyoming, where she and her husband, outgoing Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, have a home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1991 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Lynne V. Cheney, chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, had to step up onto a box so she could reach the microphone in front of her, she at first described herself as "short." Then she offered this tongue-in-cheek apology: "We don't say 'short'--we say 'vertically challenged.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lynne V. Cheney, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, came to Vista Thursday to tell the social studies teachers of Rancho Buena Vista High School that they can rest assured: They're doing it right. Cheney held a round-table discussion at the school that will be recognized at the White House on Oct. 25 for excellence in history.
OPINION
May 13, 1990 | Sarah Fritz, Sarah Fritz is a special-projects reporter at The Times' Washington Bureau. She interviewed Cheney at the endowment's offices
As chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Lynne V. Cheney preaches a doctrine that many of today's educators view as too conservative and outmoded. But like her husband, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, she does not shrink from controversy. She is a thoughtful, self-assured and strong-minded woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Humanities Endowment Head Reappointed: President Bush announced that he has nominated Lynne V. Cheney, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, for reappointment to another four-year term. Cheney, 48, was first named to the post by former President Ronald Reagan in May, 1986. Her appointment requires reconfirmation by the Senate. Cheney is the wife of Defense Secretary Dick Cheney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lynne V. Cheney, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, came to Vista Thursday to tell the social studies teachers of Rancho Buena Vista High School that they can rest assured: They're doing it right. Cheney held a round-table discussion at the school that will be recognized at the White House on Oct. 25 for excellence in history.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Budget Response: President Bush has recommended to Congress an unchanged $176-million budget for the National Endowment for the Arts for fiscal 1993 and a substantial increase for the National Endowment for the Humanities from $176 million to $187.1 million. NEH Chairman Lynne V.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
One year after becoming chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Lynne V. Cheney is on the move. Now that flak over her removal of the endowment's name from the credits of PBS' controversial series "The Africans" is behind her--"it's gone, thank goodness"--she is focusing on what has become, to hear her talk, a beloved priority: putting the humanities back into the educational limelight. As she told the 1987 winners of the U.S.
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