Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLytton Strachey
IN THE NEWS

Lytton Strachey

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
January 1, 2006 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder, former book critic for The Times, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1987.
OUR image of Bloomsbury, casual and perhaps fading by now, is of a Neverland where a self-selected group of artists and intellectuals ran both wild and tame from around 1910 to the start of World War II. Part toyland and part wildlife preserve, part perpetual salon and part musical bedrooms, it was conspicuously a place of wit, superior certainties, cabals and servant trouble, marked by a 30-year spate of talk and letter-writing and a kaleidoscope of highly varied liaisons.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2006 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
IF the cellphone had been invented in Lytton Strachey's time, he would've had it plastered to his ear. One can just imagine the highly social writer, a hard-core member of the famous Bloomsbury circle and author of the landmark 1918 biography "Eminent Victorians," ringing up his tight circle of friends and family to relay his dishy opinions of the people and plays he had just seen.
Advertisement
BOOKS
June 11, 1995 | Peter Stansky, Peter Stansky teaches British history at Stanford University. Next year, Harvard University Press will publish his " On or About December 1910: Early Bloomsbury and Its Intimate World. "
It must be an unusual situation when the biography of a biographer, and its history, vies in interest with the subject himself. But such is the case with Michael Holroyd's biography of Lytton Strachey, now reissued in a third version 27 years after the publication in Britain of the first part of the first version.
BOOKS
January 1, 2006 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder, former book critic for The Times, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1987.
OUR image of Bloomsbury, casual and perhaps fading by now, is of a Neverland where a self-selected group of artists and intellectuals ran both wild and tame from around 1910 to the start of World War II. Part toyland and part wildlife preserve, part perpetual salon and part musical bedrooms, it was conspicuously a place of wit, superior certainties, cabals and servant trouble, marked by a 30-year spate of talk and letter-writing and a kaleidoscope of highly varied liaisons.
BOOKS
July 30, 1995
The typo in the name of the Russian temptress in "Magic Mountain" ("Thomas Mann: A Biography," June 18) does disservice to Mann's irony. She is not Claudia Chachat, but Chauchat, i.e., French for Hot Cat. --G. BORDING MATHIEU, LAGUNA BEACH . . Could a stray sibilant have crept into the credit for the reproduction of the Strachey portrait in June 11's review of Michael Holroyd's "Lytton Strachey, the New Biography"? The "State Gallery" was cited as the source. I suspect that The Tate Gallery would be more appropriate.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2006 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
IF the cellphone had been invented in Lytton Strachey's time, he would've had it plastered to his ear. One can just imagine the highly social writer, a hard-core member of the famous Bloomsbury circle and author of the landmark 1918 biography "Eminent Victorians," ringing up his tight circle of friends and family to relay his dishy opinions of the people and plays he had just seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
How many kinds of romantic experience really exist, how many strange and unruly paths can the human heart stumble on in its search for happiness? For Lytton Strachey, his life with Dora Carrington gave evidence of "a great deal of a great many kinds of love." Thoughtful, dense with emotion, preeminently human, "Carrington" explores that intimate but maddening affair of the heart and reveals a thicket of conflicted passions seldom encountered on the screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Pianist George Shearing, who composed the iconic jazz standard "Lullaby of Birdland," and writer Michael Holroyd received British knighthoods in the New Year's Honors List published today. Shearing, 87, a London native who was born blind, led the George Shearing Quintet and other notable combos in the 1950s and 1960s. He has entertained Queen Elizabeth II and was invited to play for U.S. Presidents Ford, Carter and Reagan. "Lullaby of Birdland" is one of his 300 compositions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2004 | From the Washington Post
Frances Partridge, a diarist and one of the last surviving associates of the unconventional artistic salon that included authors Virginia Woolf and Lytton Strachey, died Feb. 5 in London. No cause of death was reported. She was 103. Born Frances Marshall, she was, through friendship and marriage, an intimate of the so-called Bloomsbury group.
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Movie: "Carrington" * The Setup: Unconventional relationship of early 20th-Century English painter Dora Carrington (Emma Thompson) and distinguished homosexual writer Lytton Strachey (Jonathan Pryce, pictured above with Thompson). * The Costume Designer: English designer Penny Rose, whose credits include "The Commitments," "Strapless," "Shadowlands." * The Look: One of the guiding free spirits of the Bloomsbury Group, Carrington is a pre-World War II poster girl for fashion renegades.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
How many kinds of romantic experience really exist, how many strange and unruly paths can the human heart stumble on in its search for happiness? For Lytton Strachey, his life with Dora Carrington gave evidence of "a great deal of a great many kinds of love." Thoughtful, dense with emotion, preeminently human, "Carrington" explores that intimate but maddening affair of the heart and reveals a thicket of conflicted passions seldom encountered on the screen.
BOOKS
July 30, 1995
The typo in the name of the Russian temptress in "Magic Mountain" ("Thomas Mann: A Biography," June 18) does disservice to Mann's irony. She is not Claudia Chachat, but Chauchat, i.e., French for Hot Cat. --G. BORDING MATHIEU, LAGUNA BEACH . . Could a stray sibilant have crept into the credit for the reproduction of the Strachey portrait in June 11's review of Michael Holroyd's "Lytton Strachey, the New Biography"? The "State Gallery" was cited as the source. I suspect that The Tate Gallery would be more appropriate.
BOOKS
June 11, 1995 | Peter Stansky, Peter Stansky teaches British history at Stanford University. Next year, Harvard University Press will publish his " On or About December 1910: Early Bloomsbury and Its Intimate World. "
It must be an unusual situation when the biography of a biographer, and its history, vies in interest with the subject himself. But such is the case with Michael Holroyd's biography of Lytton Strachey, now reissued in a third version 27 years after the publication in Britain of the first part of the first version.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
In an appropriate conclusion to an event that was universally conceded to lack surprises, the Cannes Film Festival on Sunday awarded its Palme d'Or to the film that had been touted as the winner sight unseen--Emir Kusturica's three-hour-and-12-minute "Underground." Unruly, audacious, unashamedly excessive, this emotional requiem for a dying Yugoslavia overpowered audiences here with the frenzy of a bull gone mad.
BOOKS
May 29, 1988 | Clancy Sigal, Sigal, author of "Going Away" and "Zone of the Interior," teaches at the USC School of Journalism.
Only a passionately self-absorbed actress like Meryl Streep or Diane Keaton could do justice to a film of the writer Katherine Mansfield's life when inevitably, alas, it will be made. Only a Streep or a Keaton would be equal to Mansfield's exquisitely neurotic mixture of melodramatic posing, reckless ambition (without quite the talent to match), self-destructive bisexuality and sheer bloody malice.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|