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M Night Shyamalan

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November 12, 2000 | GENE SEYMOUR, Gene Seymour is a Newsday film critic
The distance between the administrative offices of Burning Edge Pictures and the actual production "annex"--for want of a better word--seems narrow enough to be covered as quickly by foot as by wheel. But given all the tricky curves and jumps along the way, it's better that we're getting a lift this morning from Burning Edge's head honcho, who's happy to oblige despite the fact that his outfit's about to enter what he terms the "red zone" of its latest enterprise.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
I have so many questions after seeing "After Earth," the new sci-fi action-adventure starring Will Smith and his 14-year-old son, Jaden. First, just how much blinding power is in that famous smile of his? On the day Will Smith floated the idea - "sci-fi flick, father-son friction, me and the kid will star" - did its sheer warmth and radiance make everyone in the room believe that anything, including "After Earth" as an actual, viable movie, was possible? Someone wrote the checks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2004 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
In a field in rural Pennsylvania, the director M. Night Shyamalan is surveying the remnants of his handiwork, a collection of worn wood and stone houses, forlorn outposts of humanity, reminders of an era of when daily life was hard. The houses intentionally echo the lonely isolation of the paintings of Andrew Wyeth, who lives but 20 minutes from here.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
Filmmaker M. Night Shyamalan is known for surprise twists in his movies such as "The Sixth Sense," "Unbreakable" and "The Village" - show-stopping reveals that make you fundamentally rethink what you've been watching all along. Sony Pictures, the studio releasing the sci-fi thriller "After Earth," which arrives in more than 3,000 theaters Friday, may surprise moviegoers with a couple of twists of its own. Chief among them: that Shyamalan co-wrote and directed "After Earth. " After all, Shyamalan receives not so much as a mention in the movie's trailers, television commercials or billboards, which feature Will Smith and his son Jaden.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2007 | From Reuters
Writer-director M. Night Shyamalan will return to his provocative, dark Hitchcockian style with "The Happening," a thriller about a natural calamity that threatens to wipe out humanity. Scheduled for release in summer 2008, the $57-million film will be co-financed by 20th Century Fox and a production company in India, Mumbai-based UTV Motion Pictures. Shyamalan, who is of Indian descent, said this is a way of staying connected to the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2006 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
"IT'S not a mermaid story, " says spookmeister M. Night Shyamalan, debunking a widespread myth that his upcoming "Lady in the Water" would involve anything as prosaic as a Daryl Hannah wannabe. "A mermaid is just one story of hundreds of stories of creatures that lived in the water. There have been stories of entities that lived in the water since the time of Babylon. In some of these stories from earlier times, these entities would lure boats to the rocks and crash them.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2006 | Patrick Goldstein, Times Staff Writer
IN Hollywood, a town where tales of self-immolation are passed along like hot new scripts, everyone has been frantically trying to score a copy of "The Man Who Heard Voices," Michael Bamberger's new book about M. Night Shyamalan and the making of "Lady in the Water." The fascination with the book has only been heightened by the poor opening of "Lady," which arrived practically dead in the water over the weekend, making a paltry $18.2 million, the filmmaker's worst opening ever.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2005 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
One of Hollywood's top filmmakers delivered a rallying cry to the nation's theater owners Thursday, warning that one of the great American traditions -- the collective moviegoing experience -- was being threatened with extinction. Speaking at the annual ShowEast convention in Orlando, Fla., M.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2008 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
HE DESCRIBES the experience of making "Lady in the Water," the biggest flop of his career, as something akin to stripping off all his clothes and running outside to have the world collectively laugh at him. But in a good way. M. Night Shyamalan, the 37-year-old film director who shot to fame with "The Sixth Sense" in 1999, is not talking about large-scale humiliation but rather personal empowerment -- the freedom that comes from giving up concern about other people's expectations.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For someone who makes such dark and scary movies, M. Night Shyamalan seems like an extremely well-adjusted guy. The 32-year-old film director grew up in a posh suburb of Philadelphia. His parents, with whom he is still quite tight, were doctors, and they still live near their son in suburban Philadelphia. He's been married for nine years and is the father of two young daughters. His film career has been blessed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
For years, movie effects wizards have been on a quest for photo-real digital fire. The team at Industrial Light & Magic believes it has found it with its work on M. Night Shyamalan's "The Last Airbender," which arrives in theaters Thursday. "There's so many movies that have done digital fire and not done it all that well," said Craig Hammack, associate visual effects supervisor on the movie. "Usually, it's almost believable but you still really have that feeling that it's fake and it pulls you right out of the moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If ever a film was born under a bad sign, "The Last Airbender" is it. As the blues lyric goes, if it didn't have bad luck, it wouldn't have any kind of luck at all. Not only does this live-action feature written and directed by M. Night Shyamalan have to weather comparisons with the hugely popular (and DVD-available) animated TV series that inspired it, it lost the first word of its title — "Avatar" — when a certain other film used it first. Then "The Last Airbender" irritated fans by changing its trio of heroes from Asian to white and weathered the inevitable suspicion that goes with both a late conversion to 3-D and a studio decision to keep the film away from journalists and critics until close to the last minute.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2010 | By Claudia Eller, Los Angeles Times
The ultimate auteur is going for the Happy Meal. M. Night Shyamalan, the director who became a prodigal Hollywood success with his haunting stories of the supernatural before stumbling badly with his last two pictures, hopes to stage a comeback with a movie involving two giants of the consumer experience: Nickelodeon and McDonald's. Shyamalan's latest film, "The Last Airbender," which opens July 1, marks a sharp departure for the filmmaker, whose 1999 blockbuster "The Sixth Sense" shot the 29-year-old director to fame and fortune.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2010 | By Sam Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Philadelphia By now, the movie industry has plenty of practice weathering the complaints of fans who object to the inevitable departures that accompany the adaptation of a pre-existing property to a big-screen franchise. But the concerns that surfaced as M. Night Shyamalan went into production on "The Last Airbender" were more serious than the usual nitpicking. Amid the kvetching about the shape and size of the facial scar sported by the film's chief villain were accusations that Shyamalan had whitewashed the story, which was influenced by Asian art and mythology, by casting Caucasian actors in many leading roles.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2008 | Andy Fixmer, Bloomberg News
"The Incredible Hulk," the action movie about a man whose temper transforms him into a green beast, was the top film at U.S. and Canadian theaters this weekend with sales of $54.5 million. The movie topped director M. Night Shyamalan's "The Happening," a thriller starring Mark Wahlberg that opened in third place with $30.5 million, box-office tracker Media by Numbers said Sunday. "Hulk," distributed by General Electric Co.'s Universal Pictures, is the second movie this year produced by Marvel Entertainment Inc. to have a first-place opening.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2008 | Allyssa Lee, Special to The Times
In THE special-effects world, you've got your flashy, big-explosion guys, and then there's Steve Cremin. Although he's worked on some pretty high-profile movies -- "Jarhead," "There Will Be Blood," and mostly recently, M. Night Shyamalan's "The Happening" -- the 51-year-old effects coordinator isn't looking to overwhelm audiences. "I make sure that I don't upstage anything with the effects," he says. "I'm not obtrusive."
BUSINESS
June 23, 2006 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
A new chapter has just been written in Hollywood about the never-ending tension between "the talent" and "the suits." It can be found in a soon-to-be-published tell-all book that offers something very rare, indeed: a candid recounting, complete with tears and recriminations, of a messy divorce between a movie studio and one of the world's most famous writer-directors. In "The Man Who Heard Voices: Or, How M.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2004 | Jonathan Taylor, Times Staff Writer
With his new film "The Village" coming out, filmmaker M. Night Shyamalan and the Sci Fi Channel may have hoped to create the type of unconventional marketing stunts that made "The Blair Witch Project" a phenomenon five years ago. Instead, the cable network has been forced to admit that the "unauthorized documentary" it aired Sunday night on Shyamalan's "buried secret" was part of an elaborate hoax gone awry.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2008 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
HE DESCRIBES the experience of making "Lady in the Water," the biggest flop of his career, as something akin to stripping off all his clothes and running outside to have the world collectively laugh at him. But in a good way. M. Night Shyamalan, the 37-year-old film director who shot to fame with "The Sixth Sense" in 1999, is not talking about large-scale humiliation but rather personal empowerment -- the freedom that comes from giving up concern about other people's expectations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2008 | Susan King
Director M. Night Shyamalan, whose "The Sixth Sense" stamped him as the master of the story twist, recalls two years ago when he was in Spain on a promotional tour for "Lady in the Water" and someone asked him what his next project would be. "I said it is going to be a 90-minute paranoia movie, and that is what it ended up being," he says.
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