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Maastricht Treaty

NEWS
June 8, 1993 | From Associated Press
Margaret Thatcher, battling to the end against closer European union, said Monday that she would never have signed the treaty negotiated by her successor, Prime Minister John Major. "The voluntary alliance of 12 nations (the European Community) we joined is being gradually turned into a new political entity, a European superstate," Thatcher told the House of Lords. She led a last-ditch attempt to frustrate a bill to ratify the Maastricht Treaty on European Union.
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NEWS
May 21, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of acrimonious debate and hurtful political infighting, the House of Commons voted Thursday night to ratify the Maastricht Treaty on European unity. The bill now goes to the House of Lords, where its approval is expected despite fierce opposition from Tory peers led by former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.
NEWS
May 20, 1993 | Associated Press
With the fate of the European unity treaty hanging on a final battle in Parliament now that Denmark has ratified the pact, British Prime Minister John Major acknowledged Wednesday that there is widespread concern about losing national sovereignty. But he insisted: "It simply will not happen, the British won't have it." It is not at all certain the British will "have" the Maastricht Treaty--which requires the ratification of all 12 European Community nations.
NEWS
May 19, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Danish voters, breathing new life into the cause of European unity, reversed course Tuesday and ratified the European Community's treaty on economic and political union. Final results showed 56.8% of the voters supported the treaty and 43.2% opposed it. The 85% voter turnout reflected the intense interest that the treaty had generated.
NEWS
May 15, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Denmark will have another chance to vote for European unity Tuesday, but it may be too late to put the movement back on track anytime soon. Fundamental doubts about the European Community's march to political and economic unity--common European defense and foreign policies, a single EC currency--have spread to all the Community's major countries. Germany is worried about losing its currency, France about its identity and Britain about its sovereignty.
NEWS
March 13, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Europe's lofty dreams of political and economic unity, brought down to earth by a "no" vote in Denmark last year, are now being slowly pushed six feet under in Great Britain. British Prime Minister John Major may yet prevail in his effort to forge a parliamentary majority in favor of closer ties with the Continent.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | Associated Press
Germany ratified the treaty on European political and economic union Friday, becoming the 10th of the 12 European Community nations to sign on. Still undecided on the issue are Denmark, whose voters have already refused once to ratify the so-called Maastricht Treaty, and Britain, where opposition is strong. All 12 EC nations, which signed the treaty in the Dutch town of Maastricht last year, must ratify the accord before it takes effect.
NEWS
December 12, 1992 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the prospect of a politically united Europe fading fast, European Community leaders made a last desperate effort Friday to rescue the treaty they signed one year ago in the Dutch town of Maastricht. On the first day of a two-day summit, the leaders reported uncertain progress toward resolving their immediate predicament: how to get Denmark, whose voters rejected the Maastricht Treaty in June, back on board. "There might be no deal," warned Danish Foreign Minister Uffe Ellemann-Jensen.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Britain took over the European Community presidency in July, Prime Minister John Major's government expected to put its positive stamp on EC activities. But on the eve of a British-hosted EC summit, which opens here in the Scottish capital today, Britain's leadership has been criticized and beset, and Major can only hope to keep the summit from crumbling.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Brussels-based lobbyist told a group of medical device makers this week that, despite uncertainty over ratification of a treaty on closer political union in Western Europe, efforts to set standards for their products will proceed as planned. Paul Adamson, a European Community lobbyist for the Health Industry Manufacturers Assn., said that recent financial and political turmoil surrounding the Maastricht Treaty may ironically benefit U.S. companies by simplifying doing business in Europe.
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