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SPORTS
April 5, 1986
Mac O'Grady's outspoken criticism of Deane Beman and his policies in no way merits an exorbitant fine and up to 12 weeks suspension. Did he ever hear of the First Amendment? I have the right to criticize Beman and vice versa. Because of that criticism, does he have the right to fine me? But, he says he has the power to fine and suspend O'Grady. If he does, then Deane Beman is a czar and should be penalized for bad judgment. W.J. SHAFFNER Encino
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SPORTS
April 6, 1994 | JOHN CHERWA
Mac O'Grady, golf's abstract philosopher, grabbed some attention this week when he suggested that many of the top players were using beta-blockers to help with their putting. "Of the 30 top players worldwide, I would be surprised if less than seven (are using beta-blockers)," O'Grady told the Augusta Chronicle. Beta-blockers, available only through prescription, are given to people with high-blood pressure or anxiety. It also is used to treat some heart problems by slowing the heart rate.
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SPORTS
March 1, 1986
I have done two things quite recently which are completely out of character. One is writing this letter and the other is going out to the Los Angeles Open golf tournament and rooting against someone. After reading the quote attributed to Mac O'Grady that Riviera was like a "cheap public course" I cannot keep silent. As a weekend duffer who has to play those "cheap public courses," I think Mr. O'Grady owes the 200,000 persons who hit the links every weekend in Southern California an apology.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1989
Forget Mike Tyson fighting George Foreman, Frank Bruno or any of the rest of the weak heavyweights. What we need is a bout with a legitimate contender, Mac O'Grady. CHUCK HILL Sherman Oaks
SPORTS
April 6, 1994 | JOHN CHERWA
Mac O'Grady, golf's abstract philosopher, grabbed some attention this week when he suggested that many of the top players were using beta-blockers to help with their putting. "Of the 30 top players worldwide, I would be surprised if less than seven (are using beta-blockers)," O'Grady told the Augusta Chronicle. Beta-blockers, available only through prescription, are given to people with high-blood pressure or anxiety. It also is used to treat some heart problems by slowing the heart rate.
SPORTS
August 5, 1989 | Associated Press
Mac O'Grady and the father of a caddy had to be pulled apart by security guards after fighting Friday during the Federal Express St. Jude golf tournament, PGA Tour officials said. No one was hurt, and neither side is pressing charges, but the PGA is investigating. O'Grady will no longer be playing in the tournament because he missed the cut. PGA Tournament Director Mike Shea said the altercation occurred near the 18th green when Tommy Stickney Sr.
SPORTS
January 13, 1988 | BRIAN HEWITT, Times Staff Writer
They called a press conference for golfer Mac O'Grady Tuesday afternoon at La Costa Country Club and it almost turned into a seance. "At times you feel like you are on the Apollo spacecraft sitting in the Saturn 5 rocket with 5 million pounds of liquid nitrogen in your stomach," O'Grady said, among other things.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1989
Forget Mike Tyson fighting George Foreman, Frank Bruno or any of the rest of the weak heavyweights. What we need is a bout with a legitimate contender, Mac O'Grady. CHUCK HILL Sherman Oaks
SPORTS
January 29, 1989 | Associated Press
Exit Mac O'Grady. Enter Henry P.P. Farnsworth. The maverick O'Grady, who achieved a certain notoriety in his celebrated feud with PGA Tour Commissioner Deane Beman, says he's on his last go-round on the PGA Tour. Mac will hang it up after this season. "It's time to turn the page on this career and get on to the next frontier," O'Grady said. He didn't make a cut from June until November of last year. He hasn't made a check this year. But he'll be leaving with a bang, not the whimper.
SPORTS
August 10, 1989
The newly-formed World Golf Assn. is campaigning to return golf to the Olympic Games for the first time since 1904, when George Lyon of Canada won the gold medal at St. Louis. Writes David Wallechinsky in "The Complete Book of the Olympics:" "George Lyon was an eccentric athlete who did not pick up a golf club until he was 38 years old. Before that he had competed successfully in baseball, tennis and cricket. Once he even set a Canadian record in the pole vault.
SPORTS
August 10, 1989
The newly-formed World Golf Assn. is campaigning to return golf to the Olympic Games for the first time since 1904, when George Lyon of Canada won the gold medal at St. Louis. Writes David Wallechinsky in "The Complete Book of the Olympics:" "George Lyon was an eccentric athlete who did not pick up a golf club until he was 38 years old. Before that he had competed successfully in baseball, tennis and cricket. Once he even set a Canadian record in the pole vault.
SPORTS
August 5, 1989 | Associated Press
Mac O'Grady and the father of a caddy had to be pulled apart by security guards after fighting Friday during the Federal Express St. Jude golf tournament, PGA Tour officials said. No one was hurt, and neither side is pressing charges, but the PGA is investigating. O'Grady will no longer be playing in the tournament because he missed the cut. PGA Tournament Director Mike Shea said the altercation occurred near the 18th green when Tommy Stickney Sr.
SPORTS
January 29, 1989 | Associated Press
Exit Mac O'Grady. Enter Henry P.P. Farnsworth. The maverick O'Grady, who achieved a certain notoriety in his celebrated feud with PGA Tour Commissioner Deane Beman, says he's on his last go-round on the PGA Tour. Mac will hang it up after this season. "It's time to turn the page on this career and get on to the next frontier," O'Grady said. He didn't make a cut from June until November of last year. He hasn't made a check this year. But he'll be leaving with a bang, not the whimper.
SPORTS
January 13, 1988 | BRIAN HEWITT, Times Staff Writer
They called a press conference for golfer Mac O'Grady Tuesday afternoon at La Costa Country Club and it almost turned into a seance. "At times you feel like you are on the Apollo spacecraft sitting in the Saturn 5 rocket with 5 million pounds of liquid nitrogen in your stomach," O'Grady said, among other things.
SPORTS
April 5, 1986
Mac O'Grady's outspoken criticism of Deane Beman and his policies in no way merits an exorbitant fine and up to 12 weeks suspension. Did he ever hear of the First Amendment? I have the right to criticize Beman and vice versa. Because of that criticism, does he have the right to fine me? But, he says he has the power to fine and suspend O'Grady. If he does, then Deane Beman is a czar and should be penalized for bad judgment. W.J. SHAFFNER Encino
SPORTS
March 1, 1986
I have done two things quite recently which are completely out of character. One is writing this letter and the other is going out to the Los Angeles Open golf tournament and rooting against someone. After reading the quote attributed to Mac O'Grady that Riviera was like a "cheap public course" I cannot keep silent. As a weekend duffer who has to play those "cheap public courses," I think Mr. O'Grady owes the 200,000 persons who hit the links every weekend in Southern California an apology.
SPORTS
February 15, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Mac O'Grady shot a three-under-par 69 Friday to take the lead halfway through the $500,000 Hawaii Open golf tournament at Honolulu, but it was his off-the-course comments that people were talking about. O'Grady, whose two-round total gave him a 133 total and a one-stroke edge over Corey Pavin and Jeff Grygiel, declined the leader's usual post-round interview, but managed to level a blast at PGA Tour Commissioner Deane Beman.
SPORTS
August 8, 1985 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Mac O'Grady, the Los Angeles golfer who refused to talk to reporters while leading the Byron Nelson tournament last May in Dallas, still won't go to the press room. Wednesday at the Cherry Hills Country Club, where he will tee off today in the 67th PGA tournament, he explained why in a private interview with The Times. "I was victimized by an article in Sports Illustrated last year that made me appear to be nothing more than a freak show," he said.
SPORTS
February 15, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Mac O'Grady shot a three-under-par 69 Friday to take the lead halfway through the $500,000 Hawaii Open golf tournament at Honolulu, but it was his off-the-course comments that people were talking about. O'Grady, whose two-round total gave him a 133 total and a one-stroke edge over Corey Pavin and Jeff Grygiel, declined the leader's usual post-round interview, but managed to level a blast at PGA Tour Commissioner Deane Beman.
SPORTS
August 8, 1985 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Mac O'Grady, the Los Angeles golfer who refused to talk to reporters while leading the Byron Nelson tournament last May in Dallas, still won't go to the press room. Wednesday at the Cherry Hills Country Club, where he will tee off today in the 67th PGA tournament, he explained why in a private interview with The Times. "I was victimized by an article in Sports Illustrated last year that made me appear to be nothing more than a freak show," he said.
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