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February 18, 1993 | RANDY LEWIS
Dr. John, whose real name is Mac Rebennack, has sported an astonishing variety of public images, from the voodoo stick-rattling wild man of his 1968 debut (an image concocted to better market him to the psychedelia set) to the jive-spouting hipster of the '70s to his own cool self in the past decade.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1994 | Buddy Seigal
Professor Longhair, pianist: "I think every one of us--whether it was Huey Smith, Allen Toussaint, James Booker or me--every piano player had his own version of playing Professor Longhair. That's how much he meant to all the cats. We all owe a deeper debt to his style of playing than to anyone else. The calypso, the mambo, the rhumba, the New Orleans fonk parade rhythms and everything else, he opened that door more than anybody."
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NEWS
February 18, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
In his earliest memory of the Mardi Gras, Malcolm (Mac) Rebennack, alias Dr. John, watched in amazement as a frightful but fascinating apparition rode toward him on horseback. His father, Malcolm Sr., had taken little Mac to see the annual Mardi Gras procession through their neighborhood, the Third Ward of New Orleans.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1994 | BUDDY SEIGAL
For more than 25 years, he's been the Big Chief of Gris-Gris Gumbo, the High Priest of Hoodoo, the Loop Garoo Shaman of New Orleans jazz, blues and fonk . He's Mac Rebennack, better known as Dr. John, the Night Tripper, one of the finest purveyors of Crescent City music tradition alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Singer-keyboardist Dr. John and the New Orleans music he treasures are gaining new audiences after their popularity waned since the 1970s. "It's doing great with the Neville Brothers, Wynton and Branford Marsalis, Harry Connick Jr. and the Dirty Dozen Band," Dr. John said. New Orleans is "still its own original place." Although he had two hits in the early 1970s--"Right Place, Wrong Time" and "Such a Night"--he decided to lay low after being dropped by two record companies. Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1994 | BUDDY SEIGAL
For more than 25 years, he's been the Big Chief of Gris-Gris Gumbo, the High Priest of Hoodoo, the Loop Garoo Shaman of New Orleans jazz, blues and fonk . He's Mac Rebennack, better known as Dr. John, the Night Tripper, one of the finest purveyors of Crescent City music tradition alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1994 | Buddy Seigal
Professor Longhair, pianist: "I think every one of us--whether it was Huey Smith, Allen Toussaint, James Booker or me--every piano player had his own version of playing Professor Longhair. That's how much he meant to all the cats. We all owe a deeper debt to his style of playing than to anyone else. The calypso, the mambo, the rhumba, the New Orleans fonk parade rhythms and everything else, he opened that door more than anybody."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While Mac (Dr. John) Rebennack has always been on a roll when it came to motivating his fingers across a piano keyboard, his career has recently also begun to roll anew. After a decade without a major label contract, his 1989 "In a Sentimental Mood" album for Warner Bros. (including a duet of "Makin' Whoopie" with Rickie Lee Jones) put him back on the charts, and now he's preparing another set for the label.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Veteran New Orleans pianist, songwriter and producer Dr. John will be the honoree at a star-studded tribute concert during the city's 2014 Jazz & Heritage Festival , with friends and admirers paying tribute on May 3. Mavis Staples, Allen Toussaint, Irma Thomas, Lucinda Williams, Gregg Allman and at least a dozen others will take part in the concert, dubbed “The Musical Mojo of Dr. John: A Celebration of Mac and His Music,” to...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2006 | From Reuters
The music called the blues can express emotions with unmistakable clarity, but some of the words, whether sung by 1930s Mississippi Delta sharecroppers or big-city electric-guitar heroes, can be pretty obscure. Hunting down the origins and meanings of those words was the mission of New Jersey rock musician and journalist Debra DeSalvo. The result, "The Language of the Blues," is a witty, bawdy and fascinating dictionary.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
In his earliest memory of the Mardi Gras, Malcolm (Mac) Rebennack, alias Dr. John, watched in amazement as a frightful but fascinating apparition rode toward him on horseback. His father, Malcolm Sr., had taken little Mac to see the annual Mardi Gras procession through their neighborhood, the Third Ward of New Orleans.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | RANDY LEWIS
Dr. John, whose real name is Mac Rebennack, has sported an astonishing variety of public images, from the voodoo stick-rattling wild man of his 1968 debut (an image concocted to better market him to the psychedelia set) to the jive-spouting hipster of the '70s to his own cool self in the past decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Singer-keyboardist Dr. John and the New Orleans music he treasures are gaining new audiences after their popularity waned since the 1970s. "It's doing great with the Neville Brothers, Wynton and Branford Marsalis, Harry Connick Jr. and the Dirty Dozen Band," Dr. John said. New Orleans is "still its own original place." Although he had two hits in the early 1970s--"Right Place, Wrong Time" and "Such a Night"--he decided to lay low after being dropped by two record companies. Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While Mac (Dr. John) Rebennack has always been on a roll when it came to motivating his fingers across a piano keyboard, his career has recently also begun to roll anew. After a decade without a major label contract, his 1989 "In a Sentimental Mood" album for Warner Bros. (including a duet of "Makin' Whoopie" with Rickie Lee Jones) put him back on the charts, and now he's preparing another set for the label.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
Exhibit A for the defense of the the struggling blues piano tradition: Dr. John's dazzling two-hour set Wednesday at the Mayfair Theatre in Santa Monica. Using the eclectic legacy of his native New Orleans as a jumping-off point, the veteran musician imbued the second of his two sold-out shows with such an informal ambiance that you almost felt you were eavesdropping on a talented musician performing for himself. The solo piano format is an elastic one in the right pair of hands, and Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2010
POP MUSIC An Evening With Dr. John A fixture in the New Orleans music scene since the late 1950s, Mac Rebennack, a.k.a. Dr. John, will discuss his storied career and the importance of preserving the music and culture of the Crescent City. A question-and-answer session and a performance with his band, the Lower 911, will follow. Grammy Museum, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., L.A. 8 p.m. $25. (213) 765-6800. http://www.grammymuseum.org Chief Santa Monica's not the indie rock hotbed that more easterly climes in L.A. have become, but this quartet's brand of woozy canyon rock could change that.
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