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NEWS
August 15, 2001 | From Associated Press
Ethnic Albanians on Tuesday accused government troops of rampaging through their village near Macedonia's capital, killing civilians and burning houses. The government said five ethnic Albanians were killed but that none was a civilian. International officials who visited the village of Ljuboten confirmed that bodies had been found but would not say how many.
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NEWS
August 18, 2001 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO ministers Friday put off committing thousands of troops to help end the conflict in Macedonia, even as ethnic Albanians made it clear that they hope the force will stay much longer than the expected 60 days. Later Friday, about 50 British, Czech and French military personnel arrived here, leading the way for 350 more alliance soldiers expected over the weekend.
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NEWS
March 19, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
The sound of heavy artillery fire mixed with the chants of churchgoers praying for peace Sunday as government forces pounded hills held by ethnic Albanian rebels seeking to expand their struggle for more rights in Slav-majority Macedonia. The Macedonian government ordered a general mobilization of reservists to counter the guerrilla assault and began other preparations for a wider conflict.
NEWS
August 15, 2001 | From Associated Press
Ethnic Albanians on Tuesday accused government troops of rampaging through their village near Macedonia's capital, killing civilians and burning houses. The government said five ethnic Albanians were killed but that none was a civilian. International officials who visited the village of Ljuboten confirmed that bodies had been found but would not say how many.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO vowed Monday to deploy more peacekeepers to Kosovo's border with Macedonia in an effort to cut ethnic Albanians' supply lines and prevent another full-scale outbreak of Balkan bloodletting. NATO and European Union officials assured Macedonia of their full economic and diplomatic support to hold the landlocked former Yugoslav republic together. But Russian President Vladimir V. Putin warned that the fighting was already spiraling out of control.
NEWS
June 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of ethnic Albanians fled to Kosovo from Aracinovo, a suburb of Macedonia's capital, Skopje, as government forces waited for orders to attack rebels who have seized the town. Locals said that only a few thousand people remained in the town, which has a normal population of about 13,000. Meanwhile, the rebels threatened to fire shells into downtown Skopje if the army keeps attacking villages held by the insurgents.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two-room school is empty, its windows shattered by the blast of a mortar round that landed outside the front door. As ethnic Albanian rebels fight to hold their ground here, only three people in the village remain unarmed. One is an English teacher, an ethnic Albanian man named Azem Bajrami, who looks oddly jaunty in his blue beret, with a dark coat draped over his shoulders. At 60, he can still do a quick, weaving sprint to dodge snipers' bullets.
NEWS
August 18, 2001 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO ministers Friday put off committing thousands of troops to help end the conflict in Macedonia, even as ethnic Albanians made it clear that they hope the force will stay much longer than the expected 60 days. Later Friday, about 50 British, Czech and French military personnel arrived here, leading the way for 350 more alliance soldiers expected over the weekend.
NEWS
April 7, 2001 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fadil Sulejmani runs the University of Tetovo these days from the basement of its only building. His second-floor office is a death trap, he claims, because it's in the sights of Macedonian police snipers across the street. Many here dismiss the rector's behavior as paranoid, but no one doubts that his school is fighting for its life. A second Albanian-language university is being built a mile away, and this city isn't big enough for both.
NEWS
June 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of ethnic Albanians fled to Kosovo from Aracinovo, a suburb of Macedonia's capital, Skopje, as government forces waited for orders to attack rebels who have seized the town. Locals said that only a few thousand people remained in the town, which has a normal population of about 13,000. Meanwhile, the rebels threatened to fire shells into downtown Skopje if the army keeps attacking villages held by the insurgents.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO vowed Monday to deploy more peacekeepers to Kosovo's border with Macedonia in an effort to cut ethnic Albanians' supply lines and prevent another full-scale outbreak of Balkan bloodletting. NATO and European Union officials assured Macedonia of their full economic and diplomatic support to hold the landlocked former Yugoslav republic together. But Russian President Vladimir V. Putin warned that the fighting was already spiraling out of control.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two-room school is empty, its windows shattered by the blast of a mortar round that landed outside the front door. As ethnic Albanian rebels fight to hold their ground here, only three people in the village remain unarmed. One is an English teacher, an ethnic Albanian man named Azem Bajrami, who looks oddly jaunty in his blue beret, with a dark coat draped over his shoulders. At 60, he can still do a quick, weaving sprint to dodge snipers' bullets.
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
The sound of heavy artillery fire mixed with the chants of churchgoers praying for peace Sunday as government forces pounded hills held by ethnic Albanian rebels seeking to expand their struggle for more rights in Slav-majority Macedonia. The Macedonian government ordered a general mobilization of reservists to counter the guerrilla assault and began other preparations for a wider conflict.
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