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NEWS
June 7, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As this country's national unity government tries to cope with an ethnic Albanian guerrilla insurgency and its own fierce internal divisions, only severe foreign pressure and fear of a full-scale civil war keep it together. The multiethnic government formed in mid-May is like a critically ill hospital patient, already on life support from the international community, said Arben Xhaferi, the country's leading ethnic Albanian politician.
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NEWS
September 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
Parliament wrestled with a crucial vote on Macedonia's peace process Tuesday, with many lawmakers criticizing the pact but conceding that intense international pressure left little room for defiance. But as the debate dragged on, a series of legislators came down clearly against the accord. The assembly was scheduled to reconvene today.
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NEWS
March 30, 2001 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His face is rigid from Parkinson's disease, and his words come in hoarse whispers, far behind his racing thoughts. But it's impossible to miss the panic in Arben Xhaferi's eyes or the urgency of his message: Macedonia is running out of time to reform.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
The leaders of Macedonia's major Slavic and Albanian parties have agreed to talks on reforming the constitution in an effort to end a four-month rebel insurgency, President Boris Trajkovski said Wednesday. Trajkovski made his announcement at a news conference attended by U.S. envoy James Pardew and his European Union counterpart, Francois Leotard, both of whom arrived in Skopje in the wake of riots that brought the Balkan country to the brink of civil war last week.
NEWS
September 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
Parliament wrestled with a crucial vote on Macedonia's peace process Tuesday, with many lawmakers criticizing the pact but conceding that intense international pressure left little room for defiance. But as the debate dragged on, a series of legislators came down clearly against the accord. The assembly was scheduled to reconvene today.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
The leaders of Macedonia's major Slavic and Albanian parties have agreed to talks on reforming the constitution in an effort to end a four-month rebel insurgency, President Boris Trajkovski said Wednesday. Trajkovski made his announcement at a news conference attended by U.S. envoy James Pardew and his European Union counterpart, Francois Leotard, both of whom arrived in Skopje in the wake of riots that brought the Balkan country to the brink of civil war last week.
NEWS
June 24, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Croatia came Bosnia. Bosnia was followed by Kosovo. Now tiny Macedonia could be another Kosovo, yet one more piece of the old Yugoslavia that is unable to contain its ethnic tensions without a towering figure like Marshal Tito to keep them in check. Other Balkan powder kegs may ignite first. The republic of Montenegro is considering its own attempt at secession from Serbia-dominated Yugoslavia. But Montenegro is not riven by competing ethnic groups in the tradition of Croatia (Croats vs.
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise move, Macedonian officials abruptly shut the border to newly arriving refugees from Yugoslavia late Wednesday, demanding that other nations do more to pay for the Balkan crisis. Interior Ministry officials said that, from now on, they will allow into Macedonia each day only as many Kosovo Albanian refugees as are evacuated out of their country to other nations. U.N. officials were stunned by the closure, which they said forced at least 1,000 refugees back into Yugoslavia. One U.N.
NEWS
March 7, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and a senior Russian diplomat will face off in London on Monday in a tense post-Cold War confrontation over escalating violence in Kosovo, a restive province of Serbia where ethnic Albanian rebels are battling Serbian police.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As this country's national unity government tries to cope with an ethnic Albanian guerrilla insurgency and its own fierce internal divisions, only severe foreign pressure and fear of a full-scale civil war keep it together. The multiethnic government formed in mid-May is like a critically ill hospital patient, already on life support from the international community, said Arben Xhaferi, the country's leading ethnic Albanian politician.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His face is rigid from Parkinson's disease, and his words come in hoarse whispers, far behind his racing thoughts. But it's impossible to miss the panic in Arben Xhaferi's eyes or the urgency of his message: Macedonia is running out of time to reform.
NEWS
June 24, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Croatia came Bosnia. Bosnia was followed by Kosovo. Now tiny Macedonia could be another Kosovo, yet one more piece of the old Yugoslavia that is unable to contain its ethnic tensions without a towering figure like Marshal Tito to keep them in check. Other Balkan powder kegs may ignite first. The republic of Montenegro is considering its own attempt at secession from Serbia-dominated Yugoslavia. But Montenegro is not riven by competing ethnic groups in the tradition of Croatia (Croats vs.
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