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Macedonia Revolts

NEWS
June 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of ethnic Albanians fled to Kosovo from Aracinovo, a suburb of Macedonia's capital, Skopje, as government forces waited for orders to attack rebels who have seized the town. Locals said that only a few thousand people remained in the town, which has a normal population of about 13,000. Meanwhile, the rebels threatened to fire shells into downtown Skopje if the army keeps attacking villages held by the insurgents.
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NEWS
June 16, 2001 | From Reuters
Ethnic Albanian rebels on Friday extended a ragged truce with Macedonian forces for 12 days as political leaders across the ethnic divide met to hammer out terms for preventing a new Balkan civil war. European Union foreign policy chief Javier Solana predicted that the North Atlantic Treaty Organization would help collect weapons from the rebels if they agreed to disarm under the peace deal being worked out. The guerrillas have demanded full NATO military intervention.
NEWS
June 22, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
European Union foreign policy chief Javier Solana held talks Thursday with Macedonian leaders and is expected back in the Balkan nation in the coming days in an effort to end a four-month guerrilla insurgency. With ethnic Albanian rebels entrenched in a string of mountain villages near the nation's northwestern border, Macedonian politicians are deadlocked as they negotiate political and social reforms that might convince the guerrillas to lay down their arms.
NEWS
June 26, 2001 | From Reuters
Armed police reservists broke into Macedonia's parliament Monday, firing into the air from a balcony to the cheers of thousands of demonstrators, as Slav anger erupted over government handling of an Albanian revolt. The protests in the Balkan country's capital came as fighting raged around a west Macedonian town even as NATO helped evacuate ethnic Albanian guerrillas from a strategic village under a cease-fire deal.
NEWS
June 30, 2001 | From Reuters
The members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization gave final approval Friday to a plan to send up to 3,000 troops to Macedonia to collect and destroy the weapons of ethnic Albanian rebels there if a political settlement can be reached. NATO Secretary-General George Robertson said it is up to the Macedonian government to conclude political negotiations to resolve ethnic Albanian grievances and observe a truce so the alliance can provide assistance.
NEWS
July 6, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government of Macedonia and ethnic Albanian guerrillas agreed Thursday to a Western-brokered truce, bringing hope that the country's slide toward civil war can be reversed. But diplomats warned that any true solution to the nation's political and military crisis remains far off.
NEWS
July 8, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another signal of Western powers' deepening involvement in strife-torn Macedonia, U.S. and European envoys presented the Balkan nation's politicians Saturday with a framework for constitutional reforms aimed at defusing ethnic conflict and reversing a slide toward civil war. "It is the basis for further negotiations," European Union representative Francois Leotard told reporters in Skopje, the Macedonian capital. "Now we need to have reactions, comments and amendments to this document."
NEWS
July 10, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Macedonian leaders began talks Monday on a Western-drafted framework for political reforms aimed at defusing an ethnic Albanian insurgency that threatens to plunge the Balkan nation into civil war. Although ethnic Albanian politicians have said the proposals are inadequate, American and European Union representatives were upbeat after the first round of negotiations. "All parties are committed to working productively with the document, so we are very pleased with the first meeting," U.S.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several days of localized clashes, ethnic Albanian guerrillas and the Macedonian government agreed Wednesday to restore a cease-fire, with the rebels promising in the NATO-brokered deal that they will withdraw to positions held early this month, Western diplomats said. The agreement, signed by the defense and interior ministers and the political representative of the rebels, restored hope that reform talks aimed at addressing ethnic Albanian grievances might move forward.
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the main ethnic Macedonian and ethnic Albanian political parties reached a tentative agreement Wednesday on whether Albanian should be an official language of the country, one of the difficult issues dividing the two groups, according to Western envoys. U.S. special envoy James Pardew and the European Union's envoy to Macedonia, Francois Leotard, made the announcement after peace talks broke up late Wednesday in preparation for a national holiday today.
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