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Machu Picchu Peru

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NEWS
October 15, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walter Huerta, a veteran shepherd of foreign tourists, pauses with his flock beside a magnificent wall of finely fitted stones. He points to places where the structure is bulging, sagging and slipping, and explains that on some chaotic days more than 1,500 tourists and Peruvian schoolchildren invade these ruins, thronging through chambers and doorways and passageways, trampling over walkways like the one along the top of the wall.
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NEWS
April 20, 2011
Times reader "audreyfan86" captured this view of Machu Picchu in Peru. The ruins represent the Incan civilization at its height, in more ways than one. The complex, which dates back to the 15 th century, stands about 8,000 feet above sea level in the Andes Mountains. Machu Picchu celebrates the 100 th anniversary of its rediscovery this summer. In honor of this occasion, this blog is posting 100 facts related to the ruins , one a day, leading up to the milestone. Check back at latimes.com/travelblog for each day's fact.
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NEWS
May 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
In an effort to preserve the famed Inca Trail to the Machu Picchu ruins, Peru announced plans Wednesday to limit the growing number of hikers on the route to 500 a day. The 30-mile path is dotted with the remnants of Inca culture as it winds through the jungle-cloaked Andes to Machu Picchu, situated atop a craggy peak about 310 miles southeast of the capital, Lima. Trains and buses have long carried tourists to the site, but the Inca Trail is also popular. A recent U.N.
WORLD
September 18, 2007 | Adriana León and Patrick J. McDonnell, Special to The Times
Authorities here are hailing a deal reached with Yale University to return some of the thousands of artifacts carted away by Hiram Bingham III, the swashbuckling historian and explorer who stumbled upon the Inca citadel of Machu Picchu almost a century ago. But doubts have surfaced about the scope of the accord and about Yale's right to retain certain parts of the collection for "ongoing research," as a university statement said.
NEWS
July 3, 2003 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
When you walk into the ruins of the Inca retreat of Machu Picchu in Peru, the first sensation is of being overwhelmed. You want to sit and gaze, to make sure nothing of this astonishing scene escapes you. Clouds huddle the Andes. The mountain Huayna Picchu rises above, ready to swat away anything that threatens. About 2,000 feet below you, the Urubamba River churns through a sliver of a canyon. Off to one side are terraces that once were filled with crops.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A 1,000-pound crane being used to help film a beer commercial toppled over, damaging a stone sundial in Peru's Inca ruins of Machu Picchu, officials said. The Intihuatana sundial is a granite block carved into the peak of the mountain where Machu Picchu lies, about 310 miles southeast of the capital, Lima. A jutting edge of the sundial was chipped off Friday when the crane fell. The commercial was being shot by U.S. ad agency J. Walter Thompson for Peruvian beer company Cervesur.
WORLD
February 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Peru has closed the Inca Trail that leads to Machu Picchu, South America's greatest tourist attraction, for a month of maintenance, authorities said. The 40-mile trail, which links the city of Cusco to the Inca citadel and 12 other archeological sites in the forested mountains, will be reopened March 1. Machu Picchu remains open to tourists and is accessible by train from Cusco.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1988 | CHARLES PERRY
So far as I know, we were eating at the only Peruvian restaurant in Lawndale, and so the two dedicated dentists were telling us about their expedition to Peru. They'd been through the part about setting up the dental clinic and seeing the Inca ruins. They'd just gotten to the pink-skinned porpoises when the dish of fried plantain arrived. "Aha," said a dedicated dentist, spearing some plantain with a fork. "Fried bananas. This is Peru to me."
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After visitors behold the splendors of this mountaintop citadel, after they pile back into the tourist bus with its aroma of sunscreen and automotive exhaust, the goodbye ritual begins. As the aging bus rumbles and grumbles down a steep dirt road with 14 switchbacks, an indigenous boy races the vehicle down the mountainside. The boy gives a tribal whoop and plunges into the underbrush. He dashes periodically across the road during the half-hour ride, then climbs aboard the bus at the end.
TRAVEL
February 20, 2000 | KURT GLAUBITZ, Kurt Glaubitz is a freelance writer living in Pacifica, Calif
I could barely contain my excitement as the train ground to a halt at Kilometer 88. I expected to see the Andes towering gloriously above us, hinting at the secrets of the lost city of the Incas. From the window of the antiquated rail car, I could see dogs and chickens running loose-- but no sign of those picture-postcard peaks. Clearly we were in the middle of nowhere, and I wondered whether this was the right place. But my traveling companion, Kevin Cadle, seemed sure.
WORLD
January 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Peru's Foreign Ministry said Royal Nepal Airlines, based about halfway around the world, had put a picture of Peru's Inca ruins of Machu Picchu on a poster with the slogan: "Have you seen Nepal?" "The airline ... offered apologies to Peru for using the picture of the Machu Picchu Sanctuary on a poster to promote their country and assured that the lamentable error has been corrected," a ministry statement said. It said an airline employee had been fired.
WORLD
May 3, 2006 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
Darwin Camacho, tour guide and denizen of this place for a quarter of a century, gestures toward gaps in the famously precise stonework of an Inca wall. "The stones are separating," he says, pointing to the fissures separating blocks once snugly fit together by craftsmen toiling without wheel or cement. "Something needs to be done about this....
WORLD
February 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Peru has closed the Inca Trail that leads to Machu Picchu, South America's greatest tourist attraction, for a month of maintenance, authorities said. The 40-mile trail, which links the city of Cusco to the Inca citadel and 12 other archeological sites in the forested mountains, will be reopened March 1. Machu Picchu remains open to tourists and is accessible by train from Cusco.
NEWS
July 3, 2003 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
When you walk into the ruins of the Inca retreat of Machu Picchu in Peru, the first sensation is of being overwhelmed. You want to sit and gaze, to make sure nothing of this astonishing scene escapes you. Clouds huddle the Andes. The mountain Huayna Picchu rises above, ready to swat away anything that threatens. About 2,000 feet below you, the Urubamba River churns through a sliver of a canyon. Off to one side are terraces that once were filled with crops.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A 1,000-pound crane being used to help film a beer commercial toppled over, damaging a stone sundial in Peru's Inca ruins of Machu Picchu, officials said. The Intihuatana sundial is a granite block carved into the peak of the mountain where Machu Picchu lies, about 310 miles southeast of the capital, Lima. A jutting edge of the sundial was chipped off Friday when the crane fell. The commercial was being shot by U.S. ad agency J. Walter Thompson for Peruvian beer company Cervesur.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
In an effort to preserve the famed Inca Trail to the Machu Picchu ruins, Peru announced plans Wednesday to limit the growing number of hikers on the route to 500 a day. The 30-mile path is dotted with the remnants of Inca culture as it winds through the jungle-cloaked Andes to Machu Picchu, situated atop a craggy peak about 310 miles southeast of the capital, Lima. Trains and buses have long carried tourists to the site, but the Inca Trail is also popular. A recent U.N.
WORLD
January 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Peru's Foreign Ministry said Royal Nepal Airlines, based about halfway around the world, had put a picture of Peru's Inca ruins of Machu Picchu on a poster with the slogan: "Have you seen Nepal?" "The airline ... offered apologies to Peru for using the picture of the Machu Picchu Sanctuary on a poster to promote their country and assured that the lamentable error has been corrected," a ministry statement said. It said an airline employee had been fired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Peruvian archeologists have found a pair of tiny meteorites in the ruins of the ancient city of Machu Picchu, an important religious center of the pre-Colombian Inca empire. The meteorites, found among a collection of carvings, rings, collars and other utensils, are thought to have been used by the Incas to hew stone and metal and suggest that the site was not only a religious center but a working city.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After visitors behold the splendors of this mountaintop citadel, after they pile back into the tourist bus with its aroma of sunscreen and automotive exhaust, the goodbye ritual begins. As the aging bus rumbles and grumbles down a steep dirt road with 14 switchbacks, an indigenous boy races the vehicle down the mountainside. The boy gives a tribal whoop and plunges into the underbrush. He dashes periodically across the road during the half-hour ride, then climbs aboard the bus at the end.
TRAVEL
February 20, 2000 | KURT GLAUBITZ, Kurt Glaubitz is a freelance writer living in Pacifica, Calif
I could barely contain my excitement as the train ground to a halt at Kilometer 88. I expected to see the Andes towering gloriously above us, hinting at the secrets of the lost city of the Incas. From the window of the antiquated rail car, I could see dogs and chickens running loose-- but no sign of those picture-postcard peaks. Clearly we were in the middle of nowhere, and I wondered whether this was the right place. But my traveling companion, Kevin Cadle, seemed sure.
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