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Machu Picchu

NEWS
August 13, 2011
Del Dickson and his wife, Ann, were rowing across San Diego Bay one June morning when they saw this osprey landing on a man-made nest atop a former telephone pole. The couple had laughed when the nest was built. "I thought they might as well put up a sign calling it a unicorn's best," Del said. "They showed us, because it worked like a charm -- for osprey, not unicorns. " The National City resident used a Nikon D700 with a 24-120 Nikon zoom lens. View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
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NEWS
July 30, 2011
Madeline Karabian captured this scene at Venice's annual Festa del Redentore, an Italian celebration first held in 1577 to mark the end of a plague. An impressive fireworks show lights up the sky each year during the festival, which takes place in July. "Everyone watching the fireworks celebration focused solely on the fireworks themselves, but I was much more fascinated in their stunning reflection over the water," said the Los Angeles-area student. Karabian used a Nikon D40. View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
NEWS
July 24, 2011
Machu Picchu is not alone in celebrating an important milestone this month. Rehahn Croquevielle, who was married at Machu Picchu on July 15, 2010, was in Peru earlier this summer to mark his anniversary. While passing through Cuzco, the Caen, France, resident encountered this local girl whose expressive face captured his attention. "Her eyes were shining," he said. Croquevielle used a Canon EOS 50D. View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
TRAVEL
July 24, 2011 | By T. Craig Ligibel, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Our first view of Machu Picchu was from across a cloud-covered valley. My daughter Betsy and I had hiked three hours in air so thick that you could cut it with a machete. We were exploring the partially restored Inca ruins of Llactapata with our companions on a seven-day trek to Machu Picchu via the less traveled Salkantay Route. Just as we reached the ruins, the mist lifted and afforded us a magical view of the mystical Inca city. It was the high point in a trip full of spectacular vistas, all-terrain hiking, high-carbohydrate food and spirited companionship.
TRAVEL
July 24, 2011
THE BEST WAY TO MACHU PICCHU, PERU From LAX, connecting service (change of plane) to Cuzco is offered on LAN Air. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $719, excluding fees and taxes. To cover the roughly 70 miles between Cuzco and the ruins, most travelers take a taxi or bus to Ollantaytambo, then a train to Aguas Calientes, at the foot of Machu Picchu. Train fares are about $50-$70 each way for PeruRail's Vistadome service, depending on time of departure. Most travelers then take the 20-minute bus ride ($8 each way or $15.50 round-trip)
TRAVEL
July 24, 2011
Trip logistics: To re-create the trip described, contact any one of a number of Mountain Lodge of Peru's travel partners, including Mountain Travel Sobek ( www.mtsobek.com ); REI ( www.rei.com/adventures ) or Backroads ( www.backroads.com ) or contact MLP directly at http://www.mountainlodgesofperu.com . Depending on the time of year, the basic seven-day trek costs about $2,800 per person, double occupancy, irrespective of who you book through. Airfare to Lima and onward to Cuzco is extra as are extra nights in Cuzco and/or at Aguas Calientes.
TRAVEL
July 24, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
At the top of the mountain, where an attendant will take your $46 ticket, foot traffic is steady and cellphone reception is excellent. At the bottom of the same mountain, the town teems with pizzerias, tourists chatter in half a dozen languages and a school band director is herding his traditionally costumed students into formation. "Roki! Roki!" he seems to be hollering. And then, as darkness falls, his young trumpeters and drummers launch into the rousing theme from Sylvester Stallone's first hit movie.
NEWS
July 23, 2011 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel Editor
This is the last installment of "100 Facts for 100 Years of Machu Picchu. " On July 24, 1911, Hiram Bingham III, a Yale professor, came upon the vine-covered ruins of the ancient Inca city, which the Spanish had overlooked for three centuries. To commemorate the anniversary, look for staff writer Christopher Reynolds ' story on his recent trip to Machu Picchu,  T. Craig Ligibel's story on his father-daughter trek  through the Vilcabamba Mountains and Sarah Karnasiewicz's article on the solitary wonders of Colca Canyon.
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