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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2009 | Jean Merl
Nancy M. Daly, a widely respected children's advocate, philanthropist and arts leader in Los Angeles, has died. She was 68. Daly, who had high-profile marriages to entertainment executive Robert A. Daly and former Los Angeles Mayor Richard J. Riordan, had been battling pancreatic cancer. She died Friday in St. Louis while traveling back to Los Angeles from New York in a motor home with her three adult children. "It's exactly what she wanted," her daughter Linda Daly said Saturday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2009 | Jean Merl
Nancy M. Daly, a widely respected children's advocate, philanthropist and arts leader in Los Angeles, has died. She was 68. Daly, who had high-profile marriages to entertainment executive Robert A. Daly and former Los Angeles Mayor Richard J. Riordan, had been battling pancreatic cancer. She died Friday in St. Louis while traveling back to Los Angeles from New York in a motor home with her three adult children. "It's exactly what she wanted," her daughter Linda Daly said Saturday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2002 | Evelyn Larrubia and Nicholas Riccardi, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles County is discussing the possibility of closing MacLaren Children's Center, its troubled shelter for abused and neglected children, and replacing it with a group home to settle a lawsuit alleging widespread violations of federal law in its treatment of mentally ill children, officials said Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2006 | Melissa Pamer, Times Staff Writer
By the time Phillip Morrow was 4, he had lived in four different foster homes. Along with his half-brother, Lemar Davis, then 5, Phillip was placed in MacLaren Children's Center, Los Angeles County's scandal-ridden shelter for foster kids, which closed in 2003. The couple who would become the brothers' adoptive parents -- Becky and Steven Norris -- came to interview Phillip and Lemar at the center. The children had been separated for months.
OPINION
October 21, 2001
The first sentence of "Hard Place for Tough Kids" (editorial, Oct. 15) seemed to say it all: "The first thing to know about the children at the MacLaren Children's Center is that they have nowhere else to go." When I worked there in the 1970s as supervisor of admissions and releases, these were "Thursday's children" who had far to go, as well as being full of woe. My mandate was to make sure we released enough kids every week to make room for the next batch of kids with nowhere else to go. So nothing much has changed in 30 years.
OPINION
February 22, 2003
Just eight children were bedded down this week in the gloomy, dormitory-style cubicles of MacLaren Children's Center. Even these last few severely troubled children in the county's de facto orphanage may soon get other homes. Good riddance to forbidding, often violence-plagued MacLaren. Now county officials need to make sure its former residents, and the thousands of other emotionally damaged children in foster care, get the psychiatric assistance, medication, tutoring and counseling they need.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1989 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
A scarcity of homes, a lack of adequate training for foster parents and "potentially excessive caseloads" for children's social workers have strained Los Angeles County's foster-care system, according to a county grand jury report released Monday. The study, which was forwarded to the Board of Supervisors, urged county officials to step up the recruitment and training of foster parents and to reduce the blizzard of paper work facing caseworkers. In a prepared statement accompanying the report, grand jury Foreman Robert Leland said Monday that the audit was triggered by a concern for the welfare of the abused, neglected, abandoned or exploited children in the foster care program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1989 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
Los Angeles County's chief administrative officer Tuesday blocked a move to open a special care center for severely mentally disturbed and abused teen-agers who are now kept with less-troubled children at MacLaren Children's Center. The action by Richard B. Dixon drew an angry response from Supervisor Pete Schabarum, who has been pushing for the intensive care facility since 1985. Accusing Dixon of bureaucratic delays, he said, "You've done a good job in giving me a lot of bull in this matter."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1985 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
MacLaren Children's Center workers on Wednesday defended the quality of child care at the much-criticized county facility and contended that many charges of child abuse are either unfounded or are based on misunderstandings of what actions are appropriate when dealing with children who are difficult to control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1998 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The protection Los Angeles County extends to the mentally ill, emotionally troubled and delinquent children legally in its care is so disjointed, ineffective and inefficient that tens of thousands of them may be in "crisis," a team of national experts on child welfare services has concluded.
OPINION
February 22, 2003
Just eight children were bedded down this week in the gloomy, dormitory-style cubicles of MacLaren Children's Center. Even these last few severely troubled children in the county's de facto orphanage may soon get other homes. Good riddance to forbidding, often violence-plagued MacLaren. Now county officials need to make sure its former residents, and the thousands of other emotionally damaged children in foster care, get the psychiatric assistance, medication, tutoring and counseling they need.
OPINION
October 24, 2002
Re "Troubled Home for Children May Close," Oct. 22: Instead of replacing Los Angeles County's MacLaren Children's Center in El Monte with a facility of a lower level of care (e.g., a group home) it should be upgraded and specialized into an intermediate-level-of-care facility, specifically for abused and neglected children who suffer from psychological and psychiatric illness. The length of stay should average one month, with placement in the community as the goal. This would avoid having these children stay in acute psychiatric hospitals (average length of stay, one week)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2002 | Evelyn Larrubia and Nicholas Riccardi, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles County is discussing the possibility of closing MacLaren Children's Center, its troubled shelter for abused and neglected children, and replacing it with a group home to settle a lawsuit alleging widespread violations of federal law in its treatment of mentally ill children, officials said Monday.
NEWS
July 18, 2002 | LEW HOLLMAN, Lew Hollman is executive director of the Center for Law in the Public Interest. The litigation referred to in this article is being brought by the center; the ACLU Foundation of Southern California; Heller Ehrman White & McCauliffe; the Western Center of Law and Poverty; Protection & Advocacy, a law firm; Bazelon Center for Mental Health in Washington, D.C.; and the Youth Law Center of San Francisco.
Los Angeles has a foster-care system driven by what is available, not what is needed. Children receive too few services too late. Thousands are shuttled to ineffective and expensive institutional care. They are poorly monitored, with no consistent, individualized care. Not surprisingly, many deteriorate in county care, populating our jails, homeless shelters and mental wards after they "age out" of a failed system. Many never overcome the effects of the abuse or neglect they have suffered.
OPINION
October 28, 2001
"I've got to tell you, I do not sleep well at night." That's what Bryce Yokomizo, interim director at MacLaren Children's Center, told a committee of the county's Commission on Children and Families last week. Yokomizo, who's been on the job just three weeks now, told the oversight group that on weekends especially, when school's not in session at the El Monte facility and the 140 or so residents have fewer activities, he worries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2001
Re "Hard Place for Tough Kids," editorial, Oct. 15: Progress has been made at MacLaren Children's Center. MacLaren is now licensed as a "group home." The county now has far more control of the facility's youth population--by number and nature. MacLaren now has the ability to refuse placement of youth who should be properly placed in a secured community treatment facility or mental hospital. And the MacLaren staff is working with state-operated regional centers to require that they accept children needing special care as a result of a disability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1986
I would like to take this opportunity to respond to your editorial (May 22), "Challenge for the Supervisors," and to the references made to the Department of Children's Services. While I appreciate recognition of the needs for this department, the implication that these needs are not being fully considered by the Board of Supervisors is incorrect. Since I have been the director of the department, I have received support from all members of the Board of Supervisors. During the 1 1/2 years that the department has been in existence, its budget has increased from $89 million in 1984-85 to $102.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1985 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Robert L. Chaffee was named permanent director of the fledgling Los Angeles County Children's Services Department on Thursday and said one of his first goals is to cut by 50% the population of MacLaren Children's Center. Chaffee, 54, has been interim director since April 11. He took over from the department's first director, Lola Hobbs, who resigned under fire after six months on the job.
OPINION
October 21, 2001
The first sentence of "Hard Place for Tough Kids" (editorial, Oct. 15) seemed to say it all: "The first thing to know about the children at the MacLaren Children's Center is that they have nowhere else to go." When I worked there in the 1970s as supervisor of admissions and releases, these were "Thursday's children" who had far to go, as well as being full of woe. My mandate was to make sure we released enough kids every week to make room for the next batch of kids with nowhere else to go. So nothing much has changed in 30 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2001 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foster children at a Los Angeles County emergency shelter have been physically abused and arrested on unjustified charges as ways of controlling them, according to a class-action lawsuit filed Wednesday.
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