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Mad Cow Disease

NATIONAL
December 27, 2003 | Johanna Neuman and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
U.S. Department of Agriculture officials acknowledged Friday that it could be weeks or months before they trace a diseased Holstein that tested positive for "mad cow" disease to its home herd. "There is a tangled web of different possibilities," said W. Ron DeHaven, the USDA's chief veterinarian. Agricultural detectives say a dairy farm near Mabton, Wash., purchased the cow from either a livestock market or another dairy farm in October 2001.
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NATIONAL
August 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
Tests for mad cow disease have come up negative in the case of an animal that died in April, the Agriculture Department said. Testing by the department's laboratory in Ames, Iowa, and the internationally recognized laboratory in Weybridge, England, found no evidence of the brain-wasting disease in the cow, said Dr. John Clifford, the department's chief veterinarian. "We are very pleased with these results," Clifford said in a statement.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
Holstein calves killed as a precautionary measure against mad cow disease were buried Wednesday at a landfill, a disposal method that state officials said would protect the public from any possible health threat. A snowstorm had delayed federal officials' plans to bury the herd of 449 calves Wednesday, but by late afternoon two trucks containing the animals had pulled up to the southern Washington landfill. "They had a break in the weather, and [the calves] were taken to the landfill," U.S.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2001 | JEREMY SMITH, REUTERS
The Brazilian beef industry and port workers are boycotting Canadian imports in a deepening dispute over Ottawa's decision to ban Brazilian beef on concerns about "mad cow" disease, cattle ranchers said Tuesday. The Brazilian Rural Society, representing hundreds of thousands of small farmers including 70,000 cattle ranchers, said it was suspending imports of potassium chloride, used in fertilizers and one of Canada's chief exports to Brazil.
SCIENCE
May 22, 2003 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
"Mad cow" disease is one of a small family of diseases that are like no others. The vast majority of infectious illnesses are caused by a virus or bacteria -- living organisms, or in the case of viruses, quasi-living organisms -- with their own genetic blueprint that allows them to invade the body and reproduce. Mad cow disease apparently is not.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Disgruntled Vermont farmers went to court Wednesday in an attempt to prevent the U.S. Department of Agriculture from destroying their sheep because they may carry an ailment similar to "mad cow" disease in cattle. The USDA, which has been closely monitoring all American livestock since the 1996 outbreak of mad cow disease in Europe, wants to destroy sheep on three Vermont farms as a precaution.
NATIONAL
February 10, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Agriculture Department is ending its search for additional cases of mad cow disease even though officials have not found several animals suspected of having eaten the potentially infectious feed believed to have caused the only known U.S. case. "Our investigation is now complete," W. Ron DeHaven, the department's chief veterinarian, said Monday. "We feel very confident the remaining animals, the ones we have not been able to positively identify, represent little risk."
NATIONAL
June 5, 2003 | From Associated Press
Five bulls from a Canadian herd that included a cow with "mad-cow" disease were shipped to Montana six years ago and have since been slaughtered, state officials said Wednesday. None of the animals showed clinical signs of the disease, said Karen Cooper, spokeswoman for the Montana Department of Livestock. What became of the carcasses after the bulls were killed was unclear.
NEWS
November 25, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Health and agriculture officials disclosed Friday that selective testing of beef cattle for so-called mad cow disease has turned up two infected animals from Germany, shocking this nation of food purists into action to demand an immediate ban on cattle feed containing animal parts and mandatory testing of older cows before slaughter.
HEALTH
March 5, 2001 | EMILY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last several months, a bizarre, miniaturized replay of the British mad cow crisis has gripped the United States. Except this time, there's been no cattle epidemic and no human victims. Just speculation, publicity, more speculation, more publicity. In part, the furor was triggered by our own regulators.
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