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Madeleine Albright

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1997
Re "Albright to Chart New Course in Foreign Policy," Jan. 25: Madeleine Albright's "I know what's best for the world" pronouncements suggest a new Victoria aspiring to be empress of the world. These declarations may excite the xenophobic arrogance of Jesse Helms, but they do not serve U.S. or world interests. Oh, for another pragmatic, diplomatic Warren Christopher! DONALD W. BRAY Professor of Political Science Cal State Los Angeles Albright supports punitive measures against Cuba because Fidel Castro is a dictator.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2013 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Feb. 17 - 23, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     CBS This Morning Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright; Chris O'Donnell; Neal Barnard; Sgt. Leonard Anderson. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Joan and Melissa Rivers; Chloe Coscarelli; Flo Rida. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC Live With Kelly and Michael At Walt Disney World: Howie Mandel; Gary Allan performs.
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NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Monday dismissed Mitt Romney's foreign policy as “full of platitudes” and light on specifics in the wake of the Republican presidential nominee's latest address on the subject. In a conference call with reporters, Albright said she came away from his speech “confused” on a number of issues, including whether Romney would have intervened to help end the regime of Libyan dictator Moammar Kadafi and if he would now arm the rebels in Syria.
IMAGE
October 15, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner, Los Angeles Times
It's hard to fathom that Saddam Hussein inspired a fashion trend. But he did for Madeleine Albright, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and secretary of State under President Clinton. It was after the first Gulf War, after she criticized Hussein during U.S. sanctions against Iraq, that a poem published in the government-controlled Baghdad press referred to her as an "unparalleled serpent. " She wore a golden snake pin to her next meeting with Iraqi officials, and a tradition was born.
IMAGE
October 15, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner, Los Angeles Times
It's hard to fathom that Saddam Hussein inspired a fashion trend. But he did for Madeleine Albright, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and secretary of State under President Clinton. It was after the first Gulf War, after she criticized Hussein during U.S. sanctions against Iraq, that a poem published in the government-controlled Baghdad press referred to her as an "unparalleled serpent. " She wore a golden snake pin to her next meeting with Iraqi officials, and a tradition was born.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1996 | JOSE CARDENAS and LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the national runners-up in the Academic Decathlon, the El Camino Real High School team knew a lot about the United Nations in theory. On Thursday--graduation night at El Camino Real and many other San Fernando Valley high schools--the team met the United States ambassador to the U.N. in person. Madeleine K. Albright visited with the team--coincidentally all graduating seniors--for about half an hour in a private room before she delivered the guest speech at the school's commencement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1998 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
The Fourth Estate should head into 1998 by way of serious self-criticism. Here are two instances of hype ruling the headlines in 1997 and badly misleading the public. The first concerns Madeleine Albright, America's envoy to the world. From the moment of her nomination as secretary of state, she was hopelessly oversold. When she succeeded the wanly drab Warren Christopher in early 1997, she won tremendous acclamation in the press. Newsweek gave her a cover, "Mad About Madeleine."
NEWS
May 18, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four months after becoming America's top diplomat, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright can look back on a remarkable start. Even her critics preface their comments with praise as they review a period in which she has: * Established herself as the most visible, colorful figure of President Clinton's second-term Cabinet, whose Stetson hats have become an unlikely symbol of U.S.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Monday dismissed Mitt Romney's foreign policy as “full of platitudes” and light on specifics in the wake of the Republican presidential nominee's latest address on the subject. In a conference call with reporters, Albright said she came away from his speech “confused” on a number of issues, including whether Romney would have intervened to help end the regime of Libyan dictator Moammar Kadafi and if he would now arm the rebels in Syria.
NEWS
May 29, 2012 | By Ian Duncan
WASHINGTON -- Folk singer Bob Dylan and former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright were awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in a ceremony at the White House on Tuesday afternoon. A number of figures from the struggles and shifts of the 1960s were recognized Tuesday. Civil rights campaigner Dolores Huerta and astronaut John Glenn also received the medal. The year 1962 looms especially large in President Obama's picks: That was the year Dylan put out his first album, when Huerta cofounded the National Farm Workers Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Tribune newspapers
"Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War, 1937-1948" Madeleine Albright Harper: 480 pp., $29.99 Madeleine Albright is a formidable figure. She was a member of the National Security Council and the U.S. ambassador to the U.N. When she became secretary of State in 1997, she was the first woman to hold the position. Her manner is direct, with a frankness uncommon for her level of statecraft. Nowadays she teaches at Georgetown, has a school of international studies named for her at her alma mater, Wellesley College, and writes the occasional book.
OPINION
December 13, 2008
Re "Speaking from experience," Opinion, Dec. 7 What a privilege to read a compendium from such a stellar panel. George Shultz, James Baker, Warren Christopher, Madeleine Albright and Colin Powell have given much to their country and have provided sound and thoughtful advice for Hillary Rodham Clinton if she is confirmed as secretary of State. Thanks for the collection. I was struck by some contrasts, and by a few other things, in the five essays. Albright alone emphasized the importance of listening: "... there has to be a lot of listening in diplomacy."
NATIONAL
September 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A miniseries about the events leading up to the Sept. 11 attacks is "terribly wrong" and ABC should correct it or not air it, a group of former Clinton administration officials said in letters to the head of the network's parent company. But in a statement released Thursday afternoon in apparent response to the growing uproar, ABC said, "No one has seen the final version of the film because the editing process is not yet complete, so criticisms of film specifics are premature and irresponsible."
OPINION
March 29, 2006
Re "Good versus evil isn't a strategy," Opinion, March 24 Madeleine Albright seems to have figured out solutions to all the world's problems. It is too bad she didn't get that revelation a few years ago when she was secretary of State. It is easy for her now to advise the current administration when she has no authority and bears no responsibility or accountability. Perhaps if the Clinton administration had acted on signs that were clearly out there of what was to come, President Bush might never have had to clean up this mess.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2005 | From Associated Press
Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, author of a bestselling memoir, has reached agreement with HarperCollins to write two books. The first volume, "The Mighty and the Almighty," will be published next spring and will concentrate on religion and its role in international policy. Her second publication, currently untitled, "will be an illustrated book on Albright's collection of decorative pins of historical and personal significance," according to HarperCollins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2005 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
By midmorning Sunday, Allison Schow already had filled a backpack and stacked high a wheeled cart she'd rigged specially to haul books -- enough material to keep the Salt Lake City flight attendant occupied for months. "I'm a book-aholic," said Schow, who made the trip here to attend the 10th annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, "and I love to feel the wonderful energy on this campus with all the people who are reading and love books."
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