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Madison Shockley

OPINION
May 2, 1999
Something unprecedented is unfolding in a City Council district that might otherwise have been abandoned because of the unspoken rules of incumbency. It's a development that sends a particular message. Four current members of the council and one former member have joined in opposing the reelection of Nate Holden in the 10th District. Two of them, Mark Ridley-Thomas and Rita Walters, will work the district for Holden's runoff opponent, Madison T. Shockley.
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NEWS
April 14, 1999 | BETH SHUSTER and PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an election with a pitifully low turnout, veteran City Councilman Nate Holden may be the only incumbent forced into a runoff in Tuesday's primary elections. In other races, political neophytes representing a new generation of Latino leaders battled it out for open council seats on the Eastside and in the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2008 | Cara Mia DiMassa and Jessica Garrison, Cara Mia DiMassa and Jessica Garrison are Times staff writers.
For Trebor Healey, a 46-year-old gay man from Glendora, Tuesday's election was bittersweet. He was thrilled that the nation elected its first African American president. But he was disappointed that black voters, traditionally among the most reliably liberal in the state, voted overwhelmingly to ban same-sex marriage. He understands that there are differences between the civil rights battles of blacks and gays: For one thing, he notes, gay people have a much easier time blending in.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1998
I would urge the Rev. Madison T. Shockley II to look within himself for the answer to his question, "Why do I still feel like a slave?" (Commentary, Jan. 19). Why would an accomplished individual, secure in his or her own achievements, allow an offense (whether racial, religious or economic) from some yahoo to impact not only his life but cause him to question his own self-worth? Almost as troubling was Shockley's admitted post-"Amistad" desire not to "sit around with a bunch of white people and talk about my feelings."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2000
While I agree with Madison T. Shockley II's Jan. 3 commentary, "A Closer Walk With Bush and Jesus," the discourse over George W. Bush's declaration of faith has missed the point. The most obvious explanation for Bush's surprising claim that Jesus Christ is the political philosopher who influenced him the most has been missed by political pundits and the public alike. The real reason for this answer, in my opinion, was that he couldn't think of any philosopher and was afraid that if he gave a random name he might be asked about the philosophical ideas, much as he was asked about the book he was reading or about the names of foreign leaders of the "hot spot" nations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1999 | EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON, Earl Ofari Hutchinson is the author of "The Crisis in Black and Black" (Middle Passage Press, 1998). E-mail: ehutchi344@aol.com
There were three lessons learned from the city's primary election: Better times mean a pitiful voter turnout; the end is far from in sight for "identity politics," and big money can make a difference for a candidate. Politicians had their cake and ate it, too, with the happy-days-are-here-again theme. They wrung their hands and wailed about voter apathy, yet they endlessly chattered on about how L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1999 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canvassing the streets of her Mid-City neighborhood was never on Peggy Copeland's agenda. A deeply religious wife and mother of three sons, she tended to her church, her new home and her family, including a son permanently disabled by an injury during birth. But something always tugged at her inside, a feeling that problems were not being addressed; that the daily lives of people on her block and in her city were wanting and that someone should do something about it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and PETER HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tempers flared early in a debate Wednesday night at Dorsey High School between Los Angeles school board member Barbara Boudreaux and challenger Genethia Hayes when they were asked to explain what sets them apart. "My record really outstrips my opponent's," said Boudreaux, who is seeking a third term. "I do not speak to people in a very demeaning manner, and I don't tell lies about my opponent."
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