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SPORTS
January 8, 1986
Professional golfer Bob Toski, widely regarded as one of the best teachers of the game, has withdrawn from the PGA Senior Tour after admitting that he may have violated the rules of golf. In a prepared statement released by the PGA, Toski said: "In the late fall of 1985, one of my fellow players brought to my attention that I may have been violating the rules of golf by mismarking my ball.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Jerry Lockenour couldn't predict what lay ahead for him 25 years ago when he stashed the Los Angeles Times' Magazine on a cabinet shelf. The April 3, 1988, magazine's cover illustration showed bubble-shaped cars traveling in "electro lanes" on a double-decked, high-rise-lined 1st Street in downtown's Civic Center area. The cover's headline was "L.A. 2013: Techno-Comforts and Urban Stresses - Fast Forward to One Day in the Life of a Future Family. " Inside was a lengthy essay that described a day in the life of a fictional Granada Hills family in April 2013.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Stephen R. Glass , a former journalist who became infamous for fabricating magazine articles, may not practice law in California because he has failed to show sufficient rehabilitation, the state's high court decided Monday. In a unanimous, unsigned ruling, the California Supreme Court said Glass had demonstrated a pattern for deceit for which he has not adequately atoned. Glass has failed to "establish that he engaged in truly exemplary conduct over an extended period," the court said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
Ten years ago, members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community browsed classified ads in niche publications to find the best places to mingle, drink and meet. Now the Internet offers quicker alternatives, and the LGBT community appears to want more from its magazines than tips on night life. Recognizing this shift, the LGBT magazine Frontiers on Thursday will announce a revamp under new Chief Executive Michael Turner.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll The 32-year-old biweekly L.A.-based magazine has an estimated readership of about 90,000 people per issue and a staff of 19. Turner, who has spent 25 years providing private equity, financial advisory, transaction and valuation services for a variety of companies, bought the publication this month for $361,000 when it was in Chapter 11 bankruptcy.
OPINION
June 5, 2007
Re "Idea rich, postage poor," Opinion, May 28 Teresa Stack and Jack Fowler correctly note that small magazines "have an outsized effect on public discourse," yet their commentary ignores the substantial editorial discounts enjoyed by all magazines. The Postal Regulatory Commission's recent recommendation preserves and fosters the continued widespread dissemination of political and cultural thought by increasing the editorial discount available to all magazine mailers. As a result of our approach, the smallest publications, those with circulations of 15,000 or less, will see lower increases than under proposals made by large publishers or the Postal Service.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before figuring out who forgot to send me a valentine. The Skinny: I'm in D.C., where a tiny bit of snow and rain has frozen the roads and created distress. In my youth that meant snow day! Now it's just a pain in the you-know-what. Thursday's headlines include Time Warner looking to unload many of its magazines and a review of the new "Die Hard" movie. Daily Dose: Actor J.K. Simmons is doubling down on his TV options. Set to star in an ABC mid-season comedy called "Family Tools," he has now also been cast in a new NBC sitcom in development for next season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000
Whether you're interested in comets or cooking, photography or soccer or mystery stories, there's bound to be a magazine in which you can explore your interests. Many can be found on the Internet. Magazines can inform you of recent discoveries, teach you valuable techniques, inspire you with ideas and connect you with fellow enthusiasts. Discover the joy of reading magazines and learning about what fascinates you through the direct links on The Times' Launch Point Web site: http://www.latimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2013 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Arnold Schwarzenegger has found lots of ways to keep busy since leaving the governor's office, including starring in action movies and lending his name to a policy institute at USC. Now he'll return to a role that stirred controversy during his time in Sacramento: serving as executive editor of Muscle & Fitness and Flex magazines. The move was announced Friday by American Media Inc., which owns the magazines. Schwarzenegger, who was named Mr. Olympia seven times, first took the editorship shortly after winning the 2003 gubernatorial recall election.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2000 | Charles Piller
Powerful Media Inc., New York-based operator of the online journalistic venture Inside.com, will launch a print magazine in conjunction with the Industry Standard, a magazine that covers the Internet industry. The print product was expected, but the partnership with a highly successful trade magazine may add credibility to the new publication, which will cover the news and entertainment media as they adapt to new technologies. Michael Hirschorn, editor in chief of Inside.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Sarah St. Lifer
While our living room bookshelves might be getting lighter (every tome under the sun is available via tablet these days!), our kitchen shelves have been getting a bit heavier, thanks to the recent influx of indie cooking magazines. Long live print. Subscriptions typically cost less than a cookbook, but they're just as informative -- often detailing recipes with in-season ingredients and featuring a timely who's who of in-demand chefs.  Here are five indie cooking mag picks, but fair warning: You and your iPad might be spending less time together once the issues start surfacing in your mailbox.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Susan Denley
Naya Rivera, who portrays Santana on "Glee," is on the cover of the Spring issue of Cosmopolitan for Latinas, which is scheduled to hit newsstands on Tuesday. Inside, she talks about how she met her fiancé, rapper Big Sean - on Twitter. [Cosmo] Rivera's "Glee" costar Lea Michele is on the cover of Teen Vogue. [Teen Vogue] Barney's New York is using 17 transgender men and women as models in its spring advertising campaign, titled "Brothers, Sisters, Sons and Daughters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Stephen R. Glass , a former journalist who became infamous for fabricating magazine articles, may not practice law in California because he has failed to show sufficient rehabilitation, the state's high court decided Monday. In a unanimous, unsigned ruling, the California Supreme Court said Glass had demonstrated a pattern for deceit for which he has not adequately atoned. Glass has failed to "establish that he engaged in truly exemplary conduct over an extended period," the court said.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Ellen Olivier
The event: W editor in chief Stefano Tonchi, editor at large Lynn Hirschberg and hotelier André Balazs hosted a massively star-studded shindig Thursday at the Chateau Marmont in Hollywood, in celebration of the Golden Globes Awards, which are set for Sunday, and the magazine's “Best Performances” issue. The scene: Celebrants swarmed into a penthouse suite thick with Golden Globe contenders, presenters and other A-listers straight from W's past, present and future movie-themed pages.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Mindy Kaling has slammed the lid down on the brouhaha surrounding her Elle magazine cover, one of four shots featuring different ladies for the mag's Women in TV Issue. And she's done it by being funny, which makes it even better.  "I love my @ELLEmagazine cover," Kaling wrote Tuesday on Twitter. "It made me feel glamorous & cool. And if anyone wants to see more of my body, go on thirteen dates with me. " PHOTOS: 50 most beautiful female celebrities "More of my body" refers to the heart of the controversy: "The Mindy Project" star, 34, was the only one of the four to be cropped in tighter, so that the shot showed mainly her face and not her bod. Another "controversial" point: Kaling, who's of Indian descent, is the group's only woman of color, and the only one not shown in color.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2013 | By David Colker
If Hugh Hefner strove to put a suave, air-brushed image on sexual freedom in the 1960s, rival publisher Al Goldstein was the polar opposite. Unabashedly abrasive and foul-mouthed, the cigar-chomping, obese Goldstein called his explicit magazine Screw and seemingly reveled in giving the middle-finger sign not only to his enemies but also the world at large via an 11-foot sculpture of the gesture outside his Florida home. "To be angry is to be alive," Goldstein - who aggressively championed free speech rights - said in a New Times Broward-Palm Beach interview in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Note to music journalists crafting their year-end lists: Omitting Wale has dire consequences. As most publications are rolling out lists of their top albums of the year - Pop & Hiss' year-end review is right around the corner - Complex magazine issued a list of its 50 best albums of the year on Monday. Daft Punk made the list, as did 2 Chainz, Arcade Fire, Haim, Eminem, Drake and Kanye, whose polarizing “Yeezus” took the top spot. Not on the list? Wale. And he didn't take the news kindly.
FOOD
November 4, 2009 | By Russ Parsons
Food is covered in all kinds of magazines these days, including lifestyle publications such as Better Homes and Gardens, Family Circle and Sunset and personality-driven magazines like those run by first-name-only icons such as Paula, Sandra and Rachel. Then there is Martha, whose magazine is both. But there is a hard core of dedicated food magazines still devoted to food, each in its particular (not to say, necessarily, peculiar) way. Because food is not the prime motivator for either lifestyle or personality magazines (in the first case, it's just part of the mix; in the second, it's as much celebrity as pure content that drives the operation)
BUSINESS
June 27, 2009 | Tina Susman
Janice Min, editor in chief of US Weekly magazine, was on vacation in Colorado when news of the biggest celebrity death since, well, Farrah Fawcett's a few hours earlier, started her cellphone ringing. And ringing and ringing and ringing. Min, who was driving, didn't pick up, but she glanced at her incoming e-mails. "Oh my God, I got like 40 e-mails in 60 seconds," said Min, whose holiday evaporated with news of Michael Jackson's death this week. "I haven't been out of my hotel room since."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
"What do journalists, CEOs and senior citizens have in common?" an editor for website BuzzFeed tweeted the other day. "They are the only groups of people left who care about reading things in print. " So goes the digital punch line in 2013. Conventional media wisdom maintains that print is headed remorselessly toward extinction, with many old-school publications continuing to struggle and, most recently, the legendary weekly magazine New York announcing that its print edition would soon go bimonthly.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Godfrey is fed up with those subscription cards that come tumbling out of magazines. Why do publishers bother using them? The publishing industry calls these things "blow-in" cards, and they've been around for years as a way to attract new subscribers. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions In 2009, the New York Times reported that blow-in cards appeared to be falling out of favor as digital distribution grew. But there's not much evidence to back that up. So why does this pesky practice persist?
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