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Maggot Therapy

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NEWS
July 21, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dictionaries say that a maggot is either a legless grub or a whim. In this story it is both. Even Dr. Ronald A. Sherman recognizes the whimsical side of his research into the medical uses of larvae propagated by the green blowfly, known to scientists as Phaenicia sericata. Medicinal maggots? "I laugh all the time when I'm talking to patients, doing their treatments," said Sherman, a world authority in this curious corner of medicine.
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HEALTH
September 10, 2007 | Karen Dente, Special to The Times
Dr. Ravi Kamble, a Brooklyn, N.Y.-based podiatrist who specializes in wound care, first got interested in maggots as a child. His father, a general surgeon, would tell him how poor people in India often had wounds infested with the larvae. "He would tell me as an aside that by removing the maggots you were actually doing a disservice to the person because maggots actually helped clean the wound. That fact always stuck in my head," Kamble says.
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HEALTH
September 10, 2007 | Karen Dente, Special to The Times
Dr. Ravi Kamble, a Brooklyn, N.Y.-based podiatrist who specializes in wound care, first got interested in maggots as a child. His father, a general surgeon, would tell him how poor people in India often had wounds infested with the larvae. "He would tell me as an aside that by removing the maggots you were actually doing a disservice to the person because maggots actually helped clean the wound. That fact always stuck in my head," Kamble says.
OPINION
May 7, 2006 | Matthew Cobb, MATTHEW COBB, a life sciences faculty member at the University of Manchester, is author of "Generation: The 17th Century Scientists Who Unraveled the Secrets of Sex, Life and Growth," to be published in August by Bloomsbury.
SCIENCE CAN FIND inspiration in the strangest of places. Take maggots. Most of us don't like maggots. We think these larval stages of insects are dirty and smelly, and the way they wriggle is creepy. But the lowly maggot is providing scientists and physicians with a valuable ally in the battle for knowledge and against disease. Shortly before Easter, I organized a scientific meeting devoted solely to the behavior, anatomy and development of maggots. Gathering 70 researchers from Europe, the U.S.
OPINION
May 7, 2006 | Matthew Cobb, MATTHEW COBB, a life sciences faculty member at the University of Manchester, is author of "Generation: The 17th Century Scientists Who Unraveled the Secrets of Sex, Life and Growth," to be published in August by Bloomsbury.
SCIENCE CAN FIND inspiration in the strangest of places. Take maggots. Most of us don't like maggots. We think these larval stages of insects are dirty and smelly, and the way they wriggle is creepy. But the lowly maggot is providing scientists and physicians with a valuable ally in the battle for knowledge and against disease. Shortly before Easter, I organized a scientific meeting devoted solely to the behavior, anatomy and development of maggots. Gathering 70 researchers from Europe, the U.S.
WORLD
February 21, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
British doctors will be able to prescribe maggots to patients with infected wounds, a hospital official said. Tony Fowler, a manager at the Princess of Wales Hospital in Bridgend, Wales, said the National Health Service realized that maggots were a cheaper and more beneficial means of treating wounds than using conventional medicine. Patients would be able to treat themselves at home and avoid the possibility of picking up a hospital infection.
HEALTH
August 16, 1999 | ROSIE MESTEL
We got a call the other day from a British gentleman named Allan Warren. You know--the inventor of the Hankybreathe. What? You haven't heard of the Hankybreathe? Nor had we. Mr. Warren soon filled us in. A society photographer and author, Warren (also an asthmatic) invented the Hankybreathe after the air got so bad near his Kensington abode that he felt as if a foot were being pressed on his chest.
BOOKS
November 23, 1997 | K.C. COLE, K.C. Cole is a Times science writer and the author of the forthcoming "The Universe and the Teacup: The Mathematics of Truth and Beauty."
An artist friend says the most pernicious disease afflicting humankind is "hardening of the categories," that seemingly irresistible urge to put things in their proper places and draw clear lines between science and art, natural and unnatural, matter and spirit.
WORLD
February 21, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
British doctors will be able to prescribe maggots to patients with infected wounds, a hospital official said. Tony Fowler, a manager at the Princess of Wales Hospital in Bridgend, Wales, said the National Health Service realized that maggots were a cheaper and more beneficial means of treating wounds than using conventional medicine. Patients would be able to treat themselves at home and avoid the possibility of picking up a hospital infection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1997
Re " 'Maggot Therapy' Crawls Ahead," July 21: Not an appetizing thought, but not a new idea. In the '50s, in Air Force escape and evasion jungle survival training in Okinawa, we learned that some wounded pilots in WWII let flies lay eggs in their wounds. The maggots ate the gangrenous dead flesh, perhaps saving their lives. BILL GOURLAY Westlake Village Your article brought back memories of my nurse's training in Albany, N.Y. I remember well a few patients with impossible-to-heal lesions--before the advent of antibiotics, who were treated with this therapy.
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