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Magnet School

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2013 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
School district officials have reversed a decision that cost a top-performing Los Angeles campus about $300,000 in funding after parents uncovered evidence that a bureaucratic error led to the loss of funds. Five other schools also are likely to get more dollars as well. L.A. Unified Supt. John Deasy acknowledged Friday that internal confusion resulted in several schools failing to qualify for federal Title 1 money. "Services that they had counted on will not be lost," Deasy told The Times.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos
A top-performing Los Angeles school is one of three in the nation to receive a $25,000 award to encourage low-income students to seek higher education by expanding access to courses that will better prepare students to go to college. The Los Angeles Center for Enriched Studies, more commonly known as LACES, was named a Gaston Caperton Inspiration Award school by the College Board on Wednesday. The money will help add a class period to reduce the overall class size, resulting in more student-teacher time and preparing students to enroll in advanced placement courses, Principal Harold Boger said.
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NEWS
April 10, 1986
The ABC Unified School District has proposed Niemes Elementary in Artesia as the site for its first magnet school. The proposal to convert Niemes, with an enrollment of more than 500 students, was discussed Monday by the Board of Education and the public. The board is scheduled to consider approval of the magnet school program at its April 21 meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2013 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
School district officials have reversed a decision that cost a top-performing Los Angeles campus about $300,000 in funding after parents uncovered evidence that a bureaucratic error led to the loss of funds. Five other schools also are likely to get more dollars as well. L.A. Unified Supt. John Deasy acknowledged Friday that internal confusion resulted in several schools failing to qualify for federal Title 1 money. "Services that they had counted on will not be lost," Deasy told The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1996
Restructuring the Simi Valley school district will cost close to, if not over, $1 million. Also, it is no secret these campuses are already overcrowded. We need to ask about safety and how these students will be accommodated. Will we have sufficient restrooms, drinking fountains, lunch areas? The concept of a magnet school is a dream idea. Currently, the plan will benefit 600 to 800 students in our district. The district has earmarked $100,000 for the technology needed at the new school.
NEWS
May 29, 1994
The Los Angeles Unified School District has extended the deadline for applications to its expanded magnet school program to Friday. The school board expanded the program May 2 to help alleviate long waiting lists and to offer a wider choice of schools. The move is expected to create 24 new magnet centers and will accommodate nearly 8,000 more students, said district officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1994 | MAIA DAVIS
The Ventura school board is expected tonight to approve a survey determining whether any elementary schools want to convert to a back-to-basics magnet school. The survey to go out in January will ask parents and teachers whether they are interested in adhering to the tenets proposed for the school, which would include students wearing uniforms and parents signing contracts agreeing that their children will abide by school rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1998 | LISA FERNANDEZ
Officials from Santa Susana High School, Simi Valley's performing arts and technology magnet school, will be leading campus tours during the next two weeks hoping to entice students to sign up for next school year. Applications for incoming ninth- to 12th-graders will be accepted until Jan. 23. The 1998-99 school year will be the first the school will be accepting seniors. There is room for 1,200 students--including about 300 freshmen--at the school.
OPINION
October 1, 2007
Re "Case spotlights race as magnet school criterion," Sept. 26 Like Rodney Dangerfield, the Los Angeles Unified School District gets no respect. Its successes receive little attention, while its failures wind up on Page 1. Magnet schools are one of those successes. Who in their right mind would want to destroy a program that has been proved to deliver all the desired educational goals -- nurturing the child intellectually, physically and socially?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1998 | TOM BECKER
Faculty and staff members of the North Hollywood High Magnet School for the Highly Gifted were commended Monday for helping to produce a district record--four national Advanced Placement scholars. Los Angeles Unified School District Supt. Ruben Zacarias lauded the teachers and administrators, who all played a part in producing the scholars. The previous district record of two Advanced Placement scholars was set the previous year by the magnet school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2013 | By Richard Winton, Andrew Blankstein and Robert J. Lopez
A student who was fatally stabbed at Cleveland High School attended an adult school in Woodland Hills, law enforcement authorities said Wednesday night. The victim was a student at West Valley Occupational Center, Los Angeles Police Department Cmdr. Sharon Papa told The Times. He was believed to be 18 years old. The student was attacked on one of the school's handball courts about 4 p.m. after an argument with two men who were described as being between 18 and 20, authorities said.  School police and LAPD officers saturated the area and began searching for the two men. Police said they did not believe that the two men were students at the school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
An adult school student was stabbed Wednesday afternoon in an altercation at Cleveland High School in Reseda and later died of his wounds, law enforcement authorities said. The victim was a student at West Valley Occupational Center in Woodland Hills, according to Los Angeles Police Department Cmdr. Sharon Papa. He was believed to be 18. The student was attacked on one of the school's handball courts about 4 p.m. after an argument with two men who were described as being between 18 and 20, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2013 | By Howard Blume and Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
No school has meant more to the African American community in Los Angeles than Crenshaw High . For most of its 45 years, it has been an established neighborhood hub, known for championship athletic teams and arts programs, sending graduates to top colleges. But the Leimert Park campus has declined in recent years. Dropout rates have soared and student achievement has plummeted. L.A. Unified school Supt. John Deasy calls it one of the district's biggest disappointments. In an effort to turn the school around, the Board of Education on Tuesday approved Deasy's drastic proposal to remake the campus into three magnets - and require teachers to reapply for their jobs.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2012 | By Shashank Bengali
NEW YORK -- Students returned to classes Wednesday at one of New York City's elite high schools even as their cafeteria and some classrooms remained occupied by more than 200 evacuees from Superstorm Sandy. The seventh and eighth floors of Brooklyn Technical High School continued to house patients from two nursing homes that remain uninhabitable after Sandy blasted the region last Monday. At the height of the crisis the school housed about 600 evacuees from Coney Island, the Rockaways and other hard-hit areas of Brooklyn and Queens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
Although Los Angeles magnet schools have long been seen as an elusive and exclusive club, more than two dozen of them are under-enrolled and actively looking to fill classroom seats. At Montara Avenue Elementary in South Gate, for example, the math, science and technology magnet can accommodate 220 students; last year just 76 applied. On a recent day, each of Montara's magnet students created projects on stars, the sun and the moon for an upcoming fair aimed at attracting new students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles school district's popular magnet program has a new deadline for applications this year - Nov. 16 - due to the early start of the school year. "Everything got moved up a month," said Felipe Ech√°varri, a coordinator for L.A. Unified's Student Integration Services. "We want parents to be aware. " Officials said families will receive automated phone reminders and an alert by postcard, but magnet-program brochures and applications are no longer mailed out. Those mailings ended last year, when the district switched to an online system.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1997
Students from Los Angeles school district's 32nd Street Performing Arts Magnet School will kick off a music and dance series at Ivanhoe Elementary School, 2828 Herkimer St., Silver Lake, on Jan. 25. Performances by the students will also be presented at the school on March 17 and May 15. All performances will be at 11 a.m. The concerts will benefit the Los Angeles Family School, a nonprofit parenting organization for students 2 years old through kindergarten.
NEWS
February 14, 2011 | By Christi Parsons and Andrew Zajac, Washington Bureau
President Obama began the official rollout of his new budget proposal Monday morning with a visit to a math and science magnet school, pointing to such public-education programs as the kind in which the federal government should invest more money. Education investment is an area where he'll likely find agreement among Democrats and Republicans, but Obama is delivering a budget on Monday that contains an array of spending choices certain to set off a vigorous debate about priorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2010 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
You can't miss the distinctive 140-foot stainless steel tower of the city's year-old downtown arts high school from the adjacent 101 Freeway or from anywhere else nearby. But figuring out how to enroll in the still-unnamed Grand Avenue campus can be elusive, and Los Angeles Unified School District officials are ignoring a school board policy regarding who should attend the $232-million, state-of-the-art school. The drill for getting into Los Angeles Central High School No. 9, the campus' temporary name, adds one more wrinkle to the ever more complex process of picking a school in L.A. Unified.
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