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Mahmoud Ahmadinejad

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WORLD
September 3, 2007 | Ramin Mostaghim and Jeffrey Fleishman, Special to The Times
Iran claimed Sunday that it had reached its goal of running 3,000 centrifuges for uranium enrichment, a much higher number than recently estimated by the United Nations' atomic agency. If true, the accomplishment might allow Iran to produce enough nuclear material for a bomb within a year, military experts have calculated.
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NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Iran's new president, Hassan Rouhani, has introduced himself to the American people as a pro-peace leader, a hippie in comparison to his predecessor, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. When asked, for example, whether he thought President Obama looked weak after backing off his threat to strike Syria as punishment for using chemical weapons, he delivered a response that would make Bob Dylan sing. “We consider war a weakness,” he told NBC News correspondent Ann Curry on Wednesday. “Any government or administration that decides to wage a war, we consider a weakness.
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WORLD
September 27, 2007 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
As leaders of 192 nations gather at the United Nations this week, there is one question on nearly everyone's mind: How do you say that name? To begin with, there is Iran's president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (ahh-mah-dee-nee-ZHAHD, according to the Voice of America, http://names.voa.gov), who captured headlines during his visit to New York this week. His multisyllabic name has bedeviled broadcasters and other world leaders since he was elected president two years ago.
WORLD
August 3, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN - Hassan Rouhani became the seventh president of the Islamic Republic of Iran on Saturday, officially receiving the endorsement of the nation's supreme leader at a formal ceremony here in the capital. Rouhani, 64, a cleric considered a moderate pragmatist, replaced outgoing two-term President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who was barred from seeking a third term. Rouhani was elected in June in a surprise landslide victory. Rouhani's formal inauguration and swearing-in was scheduled for Sunday, but Saturday marked the new president's ascension to office.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Green Wave" tells its deeply moving story three ways, using animation, on-camera interviews and extensive documentary footage to show us a moment in history that reveals more about itself each time it is examined. That moment is the tumultuous, controversial 2009 presidential election in Iran, when the spirit of reform as symbolized by the color green ended up stained with the blood of demonstrators savagely attacked by forces loyal to the ruling regime. Although a 3-year-old election may sound like old news, "The Green Wave" has considerable contemporary relevance.
WORLD
May 7, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim, Los Angeles Times
TEHRAN - Iranian presidential candidates began registering Tuesday for the national election next month to choose a successor to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Although there has been considerable political suspense over who will run, voter enthusiasm has appeared lukewarm as many Iranians are focused on economic survival in a nation battered by Western sanctions. About two dozen potential presidential hopefuls have emerged publicly so far. Office-seekers must register by Saturday to be considered for inclusion on the ballot.
WORLD
April 10, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
TEHRAN - The reform movement that took to the streets to protest alleged vote-rigging in Iran's last presidential election has been crushed. The supreme leader has made it clear that such behavior will not be tolerated this time. But that doesn't mean the maneuvering to replace Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in an election set for June 14 has been without intrigue. Ahmadinejad, who was reelected in the disputed 2009 balloting, is barred by law from seeking a third term and is publicly promoting a trusted aide to replace him. It is far from clear, however, whether the president's preferred successor will even be allowed to run. For much of the outside world, the incumbent remains the defiant face of the Iranian theocracy.
WORLD
May 22, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim, Los Angeles Times
Supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei wanted to send his onetime protege Mahmoud Ahmadinejad an unmistakable message: You're replaceable. The Iranian president had been skipping Cabinet meetings, apparently over Khamenei's decision to overrule his firing of the country's intelligence chief. So Khamenei asked a conservative lawmaker to begin assembling a caretaker Cabinet, just in case the president resigned or had to be removed, said an Iranian official close to the politician. Ahmadinejad eventually returned to work.
OPINION
June 28, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize winning cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
While some in the press press the president about coffin nails, and the 24/7 infotainment machine has moved on to celebrity obits and sex scandal, much of the world is still focusing on the Iranian election. Beirut's Bleibel (Hassan Bleibel) artfully reduces Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to a ballot-box padlock, while Moscow's Tunin (Sergei Tunin) frames him followed by fatal footsteps. Nairobi's Gado (Godfrey Mwampembwa) initiates him into an inauspicious gathering of the suspicious.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2009 | Alexandra Zavis
Patriotic Persian music blasted from the car that led thousands of demonstrators down Westwood Boulevard one recent afternoon, past Persian restaurants and bookstores. A plane hired by a local Persian TV station streaked overhead, flying a banner proclaiming: "We support freedom in Iran."
WORLD
August 3, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim, Alexandra Sandels and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN - As a seminary student, he made a hazardous foray across the border into Iraq to meet his icon, the exiled Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. Years later, he joined Khomeini in France, eventually returning home after the 1979 Islamic Revolution. On Sunday, Hassan Rouhani will be sworn in as Iran's president, succeeding Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. The styles of the incumbent and his successor couldn't be more different. But what everyone - in and outside Iran - wants to know is whether Iran's policies will change as well.
WORLD
July 15, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Iranian President-elect Hassan Rouhani has accused his soon-to-be predecessor, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, of provoking fights within the leadership and driving the economy into crisis, signaling that he will focus on the country's domestic troubles when he takes office on Aug. 4. Rouhani will have little direct influence on Iran's foreign policy or security matters, such as the disputed nuclear program that Western governments suspect is aimed at gaining atomic...
NATIONAL
June 21, 2013 | By David Horsey
The election of Hassan Rowhani as president of Iran is good news for Americans, except for the neoconservative hawks who brought us the war in Iraq and have been especially eager for another military adventure in Iran. In Iranian terms, Rowhani is a moderate. In the Iranian media, he is called the “diplomat sheikh” and the “sheikh of hope.” In his initial news conference after the election, Rowhani said he would work to build trust between Iran and the United States, Britain and other Western powers with the goal of lifting the international sanctions that have crippled Iran's economy.
WORLD
June 10, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim, Alexandra Sandels and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
TEHRAN - When Iranians go to the polls Friday, they will bid an unceremonious farewell to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the populist with the zip-up windbreaker who ran afoul of supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, even as he became Iran's provocative face to the world. But the voters will be casting ballots with scarcely a hint of the reformist spirit that swept the country four years ago and ended in a bloody crackdown. Considering the front-runners in Iran's presidential race, it seems likely that, no matter who wins, the nation will drift further into the grip of Islamist hard-liners and remain defiant in stoking regional hostilities and pursuing a nuclear program that has drawn stiff economic sanctions from the U.S. and Europe.
WORLD
May 22, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
TEHRAN - Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad on Wednesday denounced as unjust the supervisory electoral body's disqualification of his top aide from next month's presidential poll and said he plans to appeal to the nation's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Ahmadinejad spoke a day after the powerful Guardian Council, which vets candidates, barred the outgoing president's confidant, Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei, and former President Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, one of the nation's most illustrious political figures, from the June 14 election.
WORLD
May 11, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN -- The run-up to Iran's June presidential elections took a dramatic turn Saturday when two controversial figures -- former President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani and Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei, top aide to outgoing incumbent Mahmoud Ahmadinejad -- made last-minute candidacy announcements. Waiting until minutes before the five-day registration period concluded, Rafsanjani and Mashaei arrived via separate entrances at the Interior Ministry, where all would-be candidates were required to sign up by 6 p.m. Tehran time on Saturday.
WORLD
June 12, 2009 | Borzou Daragahi
After an exuberant campaign season, voters across Iran voted today in a fiercely contested presidential election with potentially broad domestic and international repercussions. Long lines began forming outside polling stations well before they opened, suggesting a large turnout. Washington and capitals around the world are tensely anticipating the outcome of the vote, which pits incumbent Mahmoud Ahmadinejad against reformist Mir-Hossein Mousavi and two other challengers.
WORLD
July 5, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Iran's ultraconservative president-elect dismissed allegations of his involvement in the 1979 hostage-taking at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. "The dissemination of baseless information by Western countries despite enjoying advanced intelligence gathering capabilities is questionable," the official Islamic Republic News Agency quoted Mahmoud Ahmadinejad as saying.
WORLD
May 11, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim, Los Angeles Times
TEHRAN - The run-up to Iran's June presidential election took a dramatic turn Saturday with last-minute candidacy announcements by two controversial political figures: former President Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani and Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei, top aide to outgoing incumbent Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. In the final moments before the five-day registration period expired, Rafsanjani and Mashaei arrived via separate entrances at the Interior Ministry, where all would-be candidates were required to sign up by 6 p.m. Saturday.
WORLD
May 7, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim, Los Angeles Times
TEHRAN - Iranian presidential candidates began registering Tuesday for the national election next month to choose a successor to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Although there has been considerable political suspense over who will run, voter enthusiasm has appeared lukewarm as many Iranians are focused on economic survival in a nation battered by Western sanctions. About two dozen potential presidential hopefuls have emerged publicly so far. Office-seekers must register by Saturday to be considered for inclusion on the ballot.
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