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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
Teresa and Joe Giudice of "Real Housewives of New Jersey" fame pleaded guilty to federal fraud in U.S. District Court on Tuesday.  The stars of the lavish Bravo reality series reportedly took a plea deal and admitted to conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and three types of bankruptcy fraud, according to the Associated Press. They both face time in prison. Joe Giudice, whose real name is Giuseppe, also pleaded guilty to failing to file a tax return for 2004. The Italian citizen also admitted to not filing taxes on income of about $1 million between 2004 and 2008.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1988 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
Two men who helped take $9.5 million from several thousand people in telephone solicitation swindles were sentenced Friday to 15 and 20 years in prison--the toughest sentences ever handed down in Southern California for that crime, prosecutors said. U.S. District Judge James M. Ideman announced here that he intended to "make an example" to others who operate so called "boiler-room" frauds.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Two stars of the reality television show “Real Housewives of New Jersey” face the reality of prison after pleading guilty on Tuesday to federal charges of committing a long-running financial fraud. Teresa and Giuseppe “Joe” Giudice entered their guilty pleas before U.S. District Judge Esther Salas in Newark, according to the U.S. attorney's office. Joe Giudice faces 37 to 46 months in prison while Teresa faces 21 to 27 months, though the defense is asking for probation for the actress.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
SEC Alleges Prison-Run Scheme: The Securities and Exchange Commission has asked a federal judge to close Citi Financial Services, a Los Angeles-based company that the agency alleges has fraudulently marketed "brokered" certificates of deposit nationwide. The SEC says that Citi has collected at least $400,000 from savers and that instead of using the money to buy CDs for its clients, Citi's principals have "instead used the money they fraudulently obtained for their own use and benefit."
NEWS
October 17, 1986
Three former Orange County residents who operated a precious metals company that collected about $8.5 million from 2,000 U.S. and Canadian investors, have been arrested by FBI agents in Miami. The family owned company, First Trading Group Ltd., sold contracts for the future delivery of gold and silver. It had offices in El Toro, San Diego, Los Angeles and Oakland, before moving to Vancouver, Canada in January, 1984. First Trading's principals, Todd E. Fisch, 25, his mother, Joan D.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1989
Princeton/Newport Partners: Five indicted former officials of the Princeton/Newport Limited Partners investment firm received encouraging news when a federal judge dismissed three mail and wire fraud counts in a criminal indictment pending against them in New York. The counts related to charges that the Princeton/Newport officials had illegally agreed to hide the ownership of blocks of Mattel stock. The judge threw out the counts, saying the government hadn't shown that the Mattel transactions had caused anyone to lose money or property.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1985
Attorneys for R. Foster Winans, the former Wall Street Journal reporter charged with stock fraud, and his two co-defendants made their final oral arguments before U.S. District Judge Charles E. Stewart. Winans is charged with relaying advance information about the Journal's Heard on the Street columns in 1983 and 1984 to Peter Brant, then the top stockbroker at Kidder, Peabody. His co-defendants are Kenneth Felis, Brant's partner, and David Carpenter, Winans' roommate.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
CASPER, Wyo. -- Robert Arthur Reed solicited investors nationwide for a wind farm here. But a federal judge ruled here this week that all the telephone huckster was really selling was a bunch of hot air. U.S. District Judge Scott Skavdahl ordered the 53-year-old Utah man to serve 12 years in prison for defrauding 83 investors nationwide of more than $4.4 million by promoting investment in nonexistent wind farms in Wyoming and South Dakota....
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Two stars of the reality television show “Real Housewives of New Jersey” face the reality of prison after pleading guilty on Tuesday to federal charges of committing a long-running financial fraud. Teresa and Giuseppe “Joe” Giudice entered their guilty pleas before U.S. District Judge Esther Salas in Newark, according to the U.S. attorney's office. Joe Giudice faces 37 to 46 months in prison while Teresa faces 21 to 27 months, though the defense is asking for probation for the actress.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
CASPER, Wyo. -- Robert Arthur Reed solicited investors nationwide for a wind farm here. But a federal judge ruled here this week that all the telephone huckster was really selling was a bunch of hot air. U.S. District Judge Scott Skavdahl ordered the 53-year-old Utah man to serve 12 years in prison for defrauding 83 investors nationwide of more than $4.4 million by promoting investment in nonexistent wind farms in Wyoming and South Dakota....
BUSINESS
March 19, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Three years after a major influence-peddling scandal rocked California and the nation's largest public pension fund, a federal grand jury indicted two former top officials on fraud, conspiracy and obstruction charges. The indictment, unsealed Monday in San Francisco, names as defendants Federico Buenrostro Jr. of Sacramento, a former chief executive of the California Public Employees' Retirement System, and Alfred J.R. Villalobos of Reno, Nev., a former CalPERS board member and one-time deputy Los Angeles mayor.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2008 | Carolyn Thompson, Associated Press
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Artist Steven Kurtz has never been shy about challenging the establishment, using a blend of performance art and science with his Critical Art Ensemble to stir debate about such things as genetically modified crops and germ warfare. A 2007 performance had CAE members launching, with some fanfare, a harmless strain of bacteria onto volunteers in Leipzig, Germany, to re-create the U.S. military's secret 1950 mock anthrax test on San Francisco. Kurtz's latest installation is another questioning of authority -- with a personal twist.
NEWS
August 18, 2002 | STEPHEN MANNING, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
A woman was convicted of fraud Friday for collecting thousands of dollars in life insurance on three slain lovers after allegedly using voodoo threats for years to keep witnesses silent. Josephine Gray was charged with murder after the first two deaths in 1974 and 1990, but the charges were dropped after witnesses wouldn't testify. The murder charges were refiled in January because witnesses agreed to testify after learning that Gray would remain in jail pending the fraud trial.
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | Reuters
A computer specialist was charged Thursday with operating a sex show Web site on a high-speed line that he got the Army to pay for by telling them it was used for communicating with forces in Bosnia. A 68-count indictment charged Gilbert Benjamin, 49, of Neptune, N.J., with mail and wire fraud and submitting false claims with the intention of defrauding the government, said Assistant U.S. Atty. Michael Guadagno.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2000 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four telemarketing salespeople were convicted Tuesday by a federal jury in Santa Ana for their roles in a scheme that defrauded more than 500 investors across the country of almost $5 million. The jury convicted Stephen James Stapleton of Dana Point, Jon William Long of Long Beach and San Diego, Nancy Ann Klatter of Costa Mesa and Robert Edwin Perkins Jr. of Newport Beach of 17 counts each of mail and wire fraud. Long was convicted of an additional count of mail fraud.
NEWS
November 16, 1987 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court, in a case with important but uncertain impact on press freedom and insider trading enforcement on Wall Street, upheld the criminal convictions today of a former newspaper reporter and two others who profited from stocks he was writing about. By an 8-0 vote, the court upheld federal mail and wire fraud convictions against former Wall Street Journal reporter R. Foster Winans and two co-defendants.
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | Reuters
A computer specialist was charged Thursday with operating a sex show Web site on a high-speed line that he got the Army to pay for by telling them it was used for communicating with forces in Bosnia. A 68-count indictment charged Gilbert Benjamin, 49, of Neptune, N.J., with mail and wire fraud and submitting false claims with the intention of defrauding the government, said Assistant U.S. Atty. Michael Guadagno.
NEWS
January 24, 1998 | JACK NELSON, CHIEF WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT
A Turkish businessman in the office of Bryan West, a vice president of Citibank in London, was excitedly describing the multimillion-dollar deal that had dropped on him out of the blue. A Nigerian official he had never heard of had sent him a letter proposing a "confidential business relationship" that would net the Turk $8.4 million. All he had to do was let some civil servants in Nigeria transfer $28 million from a Nigerian bank to the Turk's London bank account.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
SEC Alleges Prison-Run Scheme: The Securities and Exchange Commission has asked a federal judge to close Citi Financial Services, a Los Angeles-based company that the agency alleges has fraudulently marketed "brokered" certificates of deposit nationwide. The SEC says that Citi has collected at least $400,000 from savers and that instead of using the money to buy CDs for its clients, Citi's principals have "instead used the money they fraudulently obtained for their own use and benefit."
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