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Majority Leader

NATIONAL
October 4, 2013 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - For the first two years of Barack Obama's presidency, Rep. Kevin McCarthy traveled the country recruiting and coaching anti-establishment, tea party-backed candidates for the 2010 election. Many of the candidates recruited by McCarthy and his fellow Republican "young guns" - Reps. Eric Cantor of Virginia and Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin - went on to win, creating a GOP majority and propelling the amiable congressman from Bakersfield into the No. 3 post in the House leadership, majority whip, whose job is to count votes and "whip up" support for the party's positions.
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NEWS
March 7, 1996 | From The Times Washington Bureau
NO RESPECT: Tape recordings of strategy sessions held in 1990 reveal that leaders of GOPAC, the controversial conservative political action committee used by House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) to orchestrate the GOP takeover of Congress, were anything but upbeat about the field of moderate Republicans who wanted to run for president this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - California's ethics agency has fined a former state Senate majority leader $60,000 for campaign violations that include spending $26,541 in political funds on personal expenses, buying furniture, concert tickets, ski trips to Utah, expensive dinners, fireworks, a satellite radio subscription and gas for his car. Former Sen. Dean Florez, a Democrat who represented a San Joaquin Valley district until 2010, agreed to the fines, submitting a...
NEWS
November 29, 1988 | SARA FRITZ and WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writers
In the wake of what for them was a very disappointing presidential election, Senate Democrats will have a rare opportunity to reshape their party's image today when they choose a new majority leader to replace Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.), who is stepping down. The new leader will be chosen by secret ballot at a private meeting of the 55 Democrats--including eight freshmen--who will serve in the 101st Congress, which convenes next January. The three contenders for the job are Sens. George J.
NATIONAL
November 27, 2003 | Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writer
On Veterans Day, the Senate was sliding toward the year's partisan low point. Democrats and Republicans were girding for a 39-hour talkathon on judicial nominations that would yield little more than gassy rhetoric, grist for liberal and conservative activists and ideological stalemate.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2006 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
The Democrats put on their best faces after Thursday's testy leadership fight. "As we say in church, let there be peace on Earth, and let it begin with us," Speaker-designate Nancy Pelosi said after her choice for the No. 2 job in the House was soundly defeated. "Let the healing begin." But several admitted that the episode -- which saw Rep. Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland defeat Rep. John P.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2006 | Janet Hook and Faye Fiore, Times Staff Writers
Rep. John A. Boehner, with his ever-present cigarette, seems like a throwback to the days of Capitol Hill's smoke-filled rooms. He is hip-deep in political contributions from an industry he oversees. He was once scolded for passing out campaign checks from tobacco interests on the House floor. He was booted from a leadership post eight years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1989
The first session of the 101st Congress blessedly faded into the bleak November Washington dawn Wednesday, more notable for all that it undid or left undone than for its few achievements. Not many in Washington will lament its passing. The final acts were symbolic of the year. The House and Senate dismantled a major program, the 1988 catastrophic health care system, which sank under an anti-tax backlash. They then pasted together a $14.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - The independent senator-elect from Maine, Angus King, announced Wednesday he would join the Democratic caucus , saying the decision became “easy” once Democrats retained majority control after the election. His decision boosts the Democratic tilt in the Senate to 55-45. The popular former governor campaigned as a moderate voice who would try to bridge the deep partisanship in the Senate . He arrived at his choice of party affiliation after consultations with Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada - but not with Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Republicans chose Rep. John A. Boehner for another term as House Speaker on Wednesday as lawmakers of both parties all but ensured the new Congress will have very similar leadership to this one, the most polarized and unpopular in history. Rep. Nancy Pelosi of San Francisco is expected to remain as the Democratic minority leader, and senators returned Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada as the Democratic majority leader and Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky as the Republican minority leader.
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