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Malala Yousafzai

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OPINION
October 10, 2013
The irony of the 2013 Nobel laureates being announced concurrently with the U.S. government shutdown is perhaps too perfect. The immaturity of the quibbling American statesmen is only amplified by the refined maturity found in a girl from the backwaters of a country we rarely mention unless the word "terrorism" or "drone" follows closely behind. Malala Yousafzai is 16 years old. She has done more to legitimize the "war on terror" than any politicians in Washington. She and her compatriots have been suffering from this war for longer than most Americans have recognized the name of her homeland.
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NEWS
October 30, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Lady Gaga is on the cover of Glamour's annual Women of the Year issue, in which she is being recognized for her efforts to "make the world a more tolerant place," including by establishing her Born This Way Foundation. The issue will be on newsstands Nov. 5 and is available now at glamour.com/app. [Glamour] Glamour is announcing the other honorees over several days. So far, we know they include Malala Yousafzai, the 15-year-old Pakistani schoolgirl who was stabbed for seeking education for women; Net-a-porter founder Natalie Massenet, for “having reshaped the fashion industry;” and Christy Turlington Burns and Liya Kebede, for their charitable foundations.
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WORLD
October 10, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- In a possible preview of Friday's Nobel Peace Prize announcement, the European Union awarded its top human rights prize Thursday to Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenager who was shot by the Taliban for championing education for girls. It was the latest of many honors bestowed on the 16-year-old, who has become a celebrated international figure since surviving an assassination attempt last year that shocked the world. The award could play Golden Globe to the Nobel's Oscar.
NEWS
October 30, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Glamour has been rolling out this year's roster of Women of the Year a few at a time. We know Lady Gaga is on the cover of the issue, which is to be on newsstands Nov. 5. And we know some of the other choices are Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, models Christy Turlington Burns and Liya Kebede and Net-a-porter-founder Natalie Massenet. A sampling of others on the list include Barbra Streisand, Kerry Washington, Gabrielle Giffords and Melinda Gates. But today we're taking note of Tony- and Oscar-winning designer Catherine Martin.
NEWS
October 30, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Lady Gaga is on the cover of Glamour's annual Women of the Year issue, in which she is being recognized for her efforts to "make the world a more tolerant place," including by establishing her Born This Way Foundation. The issue will be on newsstands Nov. 5 and is available now at glamour.com/app. [Glamour] Glamour is announcing the other honorees over several days. So far, we know they include Malala Yousafzai, the 15-year-old Pakistani schoolgirl who was stabbed for seeking education for women; Net-a-porter founder Natalie Massenet, for “having reshaped the fashion industry;” and Christy Turlington Burns and Liya Kebede, for their charitable foundations.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013
Singer-actor-activist Harry Belafonte is one of two 2013 recipients of Amnesty International's Ambassador of Conscience Awards to be handed out Tuesday in Dublin, Ireland, along with Pakistani teen human rights campaigner Malala Yousafzai. U2 singer Bono and former Pink Floyd singer and songwriter Roger Waters will present Belafonte and Yousafzai with the organization's highest award “recognizing individuals who have promoted and enhanced the cause of human rights through their life and by example.” “Since its birth, I have been devoted to the principles for which Amnesty International stands,” Belafonte, 86, said in a statement.
NEWS
October 30, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Glamour has been rolling out this year's roster of Women of the Year a few at a time. We know Lady Gaga is on the cover of the issue, which is to be on newsstands Nov. 5. And we know some of the other choices are Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, models Christy Turlington Burns and Liya Kebede and Net-a-porter-founder Natalie Massenet. A sampling of others on the list include Barbra Streisand, Kerry Washington, Gabrielle Giffords and Melinda Gates. But today we're taking note of Tony- and Oscar-winning designer Catherine Martin.
WORLD
March 19, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON - Just five months after she was shot in the head by the Taliban in Pakistan's Swat Valley, apparently for defying a ban on girls' education, Malala Yousafzai returned to school, this time in the safer confines of central England. On her first day in Edgbaston High School for Girls in Birmingham, the teen, who has attracted international attention for her quiet defiance, issued a statement celebrating her accomplishment and expressing concern for others. “I am excited that today I have achieved my dream of going back to school," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Fiction writers don't often get credit for their influence on the world -- it is often invisible and unheralded. But among those on Time magazine's annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world, released Thursday, were two surprising names: short story maven George Saunders and novelist Hilary Mantel.  They keep company with "Leaders," (President Obama, Wayne LaPierre, Kim Jong Un), "Titans" (Jay-Z, LeBron James, Elon Musk) and "Icons" (Malala Yousafzai, Lena Dunham, Gabrielle Giffords)
OPINION
October 10, 2013
Re "The recall revolution that wasn't," Opinion, Oct. 7 Among Peter Schrag's many good points was this one: "The major changes of the last decade have been in the state's election system. Redistricting is now in the hands of an independent commission, not the Legislature. " That statement doesn't apply to all elections. The redrawing of county supervisorial district lines has remained with the boards of supervisors. The state, not the redistricting commissions, possesses the authority to extend reform down to the local level.
WORLD
October 11, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
If the Nobel Peace Prize were awarded to the most inspiring triumph of reason over brutality, 16-year-old Malala Yousafzai would be booking a flight to Oslo. The Pakistani schoolgirl's activism for education and equality in defiance of Taliban bullets made her a favorite for Friday's prestigious award. That the Nobel committee decided instead to recognize the work of enforcers of the 1997 Chemical Weapons Convention disappointed legions of Malala admirers worldwide but failed to shake their belief that she was the most deserving.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani teenager and outspoken proponent of the right of girls and young women to be educated, survived being shot in the head by Taliban gunmen in 2012. But as if attempted murder wasn't bad enough -- now the Taliban is proving to be a bad sport too. Malala survived a bullet to the head, penned a book about her experiences with Christina Lamb -- "I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban" was published by Little, Brown this week.
OPINION
October 10, 2013
Re "The recall revolution that wasn't," Opinion, Oct. 7 Among Peter Schrag's many good points was this one: "The major changes of the last decade have been in the state's election system. Redistricting is now in the hands of an independent commission, not the Legislature. " That statement doesn't apply to all elections. The redrawing of county supervisorial district lines has remained with the boards of supervisors. The state, not the redistricting commissions, possesses the authority to extend reform down to the local level.
WORLD
October 10, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- In a possible preview of Friday's Nobel Peace Prize announcement, the European Union awarded its top human rights prize Thursday to Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenager who was shot by the Taliban for championing education for girls. It was the latest of many honors bestowed on the 16-year-old, who has become a celebrated international figure since surviving an assassination attempt last year that shocked the world. The award could play Golden Globe to the Nobel's Oscar.
OPINION
October 10, 2013
The irony of the 2013 Nobel laureates being announced concurrently with the U.S. government shutdown is perhaps too perfect. The immaturity of the quibbling American statesmen is only amplified by the refined maturity found in a girl from the backwaters of a country we rarely mention unless the word "terrorism" or "drone" follows closely behind. Malala Yousafzai is 16 years old. She has done more to legitimize the "war on terror" than any politicians in Washington. She and her compatriots have been suffering from this war for longer than most Americans have recognized the name of her homeland.
WORLD
October 7, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
In one short year, Malala Yousafzai has transformed herself from obscure Taliban victim to an internationally celebrated model of courage in defense of human rights. Founder of the nonprofit Malala Fund that advocates for girls' education and raises money for schools and tuition in her native Pakistan, Malala has used her place on the world stage to declare personal victory over terrorism and to call for peace talks with the Islamic extremists who attacked her. Her activism in defiance of renewed death threats has, in the estimation of prominent media and human rights organizations, put her in the running for the Nobel Peace Prize that is to be awarded Friday.
WORLD
February 8, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON -- Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenager shot by the Taliban in October for defying the group's ban on girls' education, was discharged from Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham on Friday after cranial reconstruction and a cochlear implant to restore hearing in her left ear. Malala was discharged “after making a good recovery from her surgery last weekend,” a hospital statement said. Malala had undergone other treatment at the hospital before being temporarily discharged in early January.
WORLD
November 27, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
The Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility Tuesday for a failed attempt to bomb the car of television anchor Hamid Mir, whom the militant group had earlier threatened because of his reporting on the shooting of schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai. A Taliban spokesman told reporters that Mir had been following a secular agenda and warned the group would target others like him. Police had defused a bomb found under Mir's car Monday in Islamabad after a neighbor reportedly spotted the device.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013
Singer-actor-activist Harry Belafonte is one of two 2013 recipients of Amnesty International's Ambassador of Conscience Awards to be handed out Tuesday in Dublin, Ireland, along with Pakistani teen human rights campaigner Malala Yousafzai. U2 singer Bono and former Pink Floyd singer and songwriter Roger Waters will present Belafonte and Yousafzai with the organization's highest award “recognizing individuals who have promoted and enhanced the cause of human rights through their life and by example.” “Since its birth, I have been devoted to the principles for which Amnesty International stands,” Belafonte, 86, said in a statement.
WORLD
July 12, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Malala Yousafzai isn't the first to proclaim the pen mightier than the sword, but she is probably the only teenager to emerge defiant after taking a bullet for the right of literacy. The Pakistani girl shot in the head by Taliban gunmen nine months ago for defying their ban on girls' education celebrated her 16 th birthday Friday with an uplifting appeal for universal education in a speech to more than 1,000 young delegates to the United Nations. “Let us pick up our books and our pens.
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