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Malcolm M Lucas

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NEWS
January 7, 1987
Gov. George Deukmejian formally appointed state Supreme Court Justice Malcolm M. Lucas as chief justice of California. Deukmejian had announced his intention to name Lucas chief justice on Nov. 26, but he could not make the formal appointment until Rose Elizabeth Bird's term had expired. Lucas, 59, a law partner of Deukmejian in the 1960s, served 12 years as a federal district judge before Deukmejian appointed him as associate justice of the state Supreme Court in 1984.
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BUSINESS
July 16, 1996 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Malcolm M. Lucas, who retired in May as chief justice of the California Supreme Court, said Monday he will join JAMS/Endispute, a privately held national arbitration company. Lucas, 69, is the highest-ranking judge to join the Irvine company, which now relies on about 300 retired judges in 31 U.S. cities. He will be based in Los Angeles and will begin next month to arbitrate mainly complex civil matters, typically disputes between companies. As a lawyer in a firm with former Gov.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1987
Harmon G. Scoville was unanimously reelected presiding judge of the Orange County Superior Court, officials said. Scoville, the court's senior judge, was named to the California Judicial Council this year by Malcolm M. Lucas, chief justice of the state Supreme Court. Appointed by then-Gov. Ronald Reagan in 1969, Scoville has served in most court calendar assignments and supervised probate and law and motion departments during his tenure.
NEWS
October 1, 1995 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas, who presided over the California Supreme Court as it moved in a dramatically more conservative direction, announced Saturday that he will retire in May. Although Lucas has been stung by controversy lately, he attributed his retirement in part to his marriage two years ago to the former Fiorenza Courtright, a wealthy Beverly Hills socialite. He said he would stay on the court until May to allow for an orderly transition.
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas was reported Thursday to be "doing very well" after his hospitalization for abdominal surgery earlier in the week. The public information officer for the state Supreme Court, Lynn Holton, said Lucas had telephoned staff members Thursday morning, briefly describing his condition and saying he would likely be released within three or four days. Holton reiterated that the surgery "was not an emergency," but said no further information will be released.
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
The state Supreme Court on Thursday left intact a lower court ruling that allows public access to trials and pretrial hearings of juveniles who are charged with serious crimes. The ruling came in the case of two upper-middle-class Tarzana high school youths accused of robbing a bank and stealing cars. They planned to use the money to start an ice cream business.
NEWS
September 1, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas returned to his office at the state Supreme Court on Monday, nearly six weeks after successful surgery to remove a malignant growth from his colon. A court spokeswoman said the 60-year-old chief justice was "hard at work" full time "and feels fine." Among other things, Lucas was preparing for the court's regular monthly oral argument calendar, to be heard next week.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas underwent "successful abdominal surgery" Wednesday and will remain in a hospital briefly, the state Supreme Court announced. A one-paragraph statement issued just before the court closed for the day said the 60-year-old Lucas will recuperate at his home in Los Alamitos and work on court business upon release from an undisclosed hospital.
NEWS
February 6, 1987 | EDWARD J. BOYER
When then-Gov. Ronald Reagan named Malcolm M. Lucas to the Los Angeles Superior Court in 1967, the only criminal cases the new jurist had handled were his own parking tickets. The first case he presided over involved the death penalty. Former California Chief Justice Donald Wright counseled Lucas: "Don't worry. You'll catch on." Four years later, Lucas was the supervising judge of the court's criminal division.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
California Supreme Court Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas, under fire for apparently violating judicial ethics by making a political endorsement, said Wednesday he regrets that he "chose a poor turn of phrase" in expressing his desire to see Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren elected governor. The California Judicial Code of Conduct prohibits judges from endorsing candidates for non-judicial offices.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
California Supreme Court Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas, under fire for apparently violating judicial ethics by making a political endorsement, said Wednesday he regrets that he "chose a poor turn of phrase" in expressing his desire to see Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren elected governor. The California Judicial Code of Conduct prohibits judges from endorsing candidates for non-judicial offices.
NEWS
January 29, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
The California Commission on Judicial Performance announced Friday that it found "no basis" for disciplining California Chief Justice Malcolm Lucas for traveling extensively or accepting reimbursement for his trips. In a prepared statement, the commission said it would close its probe into whether Lucas' travels violated ethics or affected court productivity.
NEWS
March 5, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas, seeking a "road map" for the future of the judiciary, disclosed plans Monday for a wide-ranging study of the drug crisis and other persistent problems facing the courts in the next 30 years. Lucas, in his second annual State of the Judiciary address to the Legislature, said a newly designed commission on the future--called "2020 Vision"--will study how demographic shifts and environmental, technological and economic developments are likely to affect the courts.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buried in an avalanche of candidates and controversies is one of the best-kept secrets of the fall campaign: Five justices are on Tuesday's ballot seeking retention or confirmation to the state Supreme Court. The little-noticed list names Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas and Justices Edward A. Panelli, Joyce L. Kennard and Armand Arabian--as well as Appellate Justice Marvin R. Baxter of Fresno who, if approved, will succeed retiring Justice David N. Eagleson in January.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California trial courts are "close to foundering" because of a dramatic surge in drug prosecutions, which doubled in five years, Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas told state legislators Monday. In a State of the Judiciary address--marking the first time the Legislature has asked for such an assessment from a chief justice--Lucas declared that the courts should be only "among the last resorts" in dealing with the drug problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
The chief justice of the state Supreme Court, in the middle of a tug of war between local prosecutors and judges over the severity of drug sentences, said Tuesday that he has "the greatest confidence in the entire Orange County Superior Court" and does not want to meddle "in the trenches."
NEWS
May 27, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Despite the voters' unprecedented rejection last fall of three of its members, the California Supreme Court will not be influenced by "elections or polls or anything else," Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas said in a newly published interview. "What happened to us last year was analogous to a 100-year flood--a very unusual circumstance, which I do not anticipate happening again," Lucas said in remarks printed in the June issue of California Lawyer, a publication of the State Bar. " . . .
BUSINESS
July 16, 1996 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Malcolm M. Lucas, who retired in May as chief justice of the California Supreme Court, said Monday he will join JAMS/Endispute, a privately held national arbitration company. Lucas, 69, is the highest-ranking judge to join the Irvine company, which now relies on about 300 retired judges in 31 U.S. cities. He will be based in Los Angeles and will begin next month to arbitrate mainly complex civil matters, typically disputes between companies. As a lawyer in a firm with former Gov.
NEWS
May 27, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
In a rare public defense of the state Supreme Court, Justice David N. Eagleson has vigorously denied that the court is overwhelmed with death-penalty cases and is being forced to neglect important civil law issues. Eagleson cited statistics showing a reduction in the court's backlog and offered a detailed response to widespread assertions by commentators that the justices appeared preoccupied with capital cases and may be suffering from professional "burnout." "I respectfully submit that the only experts concerning the processes of the Supreme Court are the seven justices . . . ," he said.
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