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Malcolm Willits

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April 6, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE
Hollywood memorabilia auctioneer Malcolm Willits unexpectedly withdrew a 1939 Oscar from sale Tuesday night, even as phone-in bids for the statuette approached the $13,000 figure. Willits, who has been at the center of a growing and controversial trade in the Academy Award statuettes, pulled the mint-condition gold-plated figurine from the private auction and said he would return it to its unidentified seller.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE
Hollywood memorabilia auctioneer Malcolm Willits unexpectedly withdrew a 1939 Oscar from sale Tuesday night, even as phone-in bids for the statuette approached the $13,000 figure. Willits, who has been at the center of a growing and controversial trade in the Academy Award statuettes, pulled the mint-condition gold-plated figurine from the private auction and said he would return it to its unidentified seller.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE
For the moment, the brightest star on Hollywood Boulevard is William Kaiser, a 41-year-old former hospital administrator from Tuxedo Park, N.Y. In a private awards ceremony Friday in the Blossom Room of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel--the location of the first Academy Awards ceremony 61 years ago--Kaiser surprised 84-year-old art director Lyle Wheeler by reuniting him with the Oscar he won in 1959 for "The Diary of Anne Frank."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE
For the moment, the brightest star on Hollywood Boulevard is William Kaiser, a 41-year-old former hospital administrator from Tuxedo Park, N.Y. In a private awards ceremony Friday in the Blossom Room of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel--the location of the first Academy Awards ceremony 61 years ago--Kaiser surprised 84-year-old art director Lyle Wheeler by reuniting him with the Oscar he won in 1959 for "The Diary of Anne Frank."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A temporary restraining order was granted in Superior Court on Monday halting an auction today of Michael Todd's 1956 best-picture Oscar for "Around the World in 80 Days." The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences sought to bar auctioneer Malcolm Willits from selling the statuette. A full hearing is scheduled for Feb. 24.
MAGAZINE
August 12, 1990 | BRUCE DAVID
ONCE AGAIN California leads the way in changing our perception of art. Now it's "standees," the cardboard cutouts you see hyping the latest releases at your neighborhood video store. Recently featuring such big-time movie characters as Batman and Dick Tracy, these frequently life-size displays are being nabbed by a growing number of collectors who consider them works of art.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The best picture Oscar for "An American in Paris," given to producer Arthur Freed in 1951 and sold at auction for $15,760 last month, will be sent to Europe today despite protestations from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, auctioneer Malcolm Willits said Wednesday. Willits was asked to sell the Oscar which belonged to a collector in Maine who had acquired it from an estate.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1988
"Who Framed Roger Rabbit" is a technical miracle, but nowhere is it apparent that any of its 750 creators ever saw a Walt Disney film ("The Animated Arena of 'Roger Rabbit,' " by Sheila Benson, June 22). "Roger Rabbit" has no soul! Where are the scenes that tug at the heartstrings, like Snow White lying pale in death, surrounded by the grieving dwarfs, or Bambi being told his mother died? Disney knew the emotions that could be wrung from a pile of painted celluloids, and the world is richer for his vision.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1991 | GARY WOLF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Max Kaplan never believed he'd get an Academy Award. Kaplan is not even in the movie business. He owns the Mission Jewelry & Loan Co., a pawnshop in San Francisco's tough Mission District. But Kaplan now owns an Oscar--William Saroyan's 1943 best screenplay award for "The Human Comedy." The Oscar is displayed prominently in the pawnshop window, surrounded by used jewelry, cameras and musical instruments. A handwritten sign taped to the statuette reads, "Will the original owners please redeem."
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