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Maleeha Lodhi

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NEWS
April 5, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In some Western circles, there's a hard-edged view of Pakistan as a covert nuclear power, a nation where terrorists find harbor. And this is the same country that has dispatched to Washington an ambassador who wears high-heeled shoes with gold toes. Somehow it doesn't compute, the thousand-watt smile, the manicured nails, the British diplomas and blue-blood pedigree that, had it not been for Mogul interlopers a few centuries back, would have made her, the ambassador says wistfully, a princess.
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NEWS
April 5, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In some Western circles, there's a hard-edged view of Pakistan as a covert nuclear power, a nation where terrorists find harbor. And this is the same country that has dispatched to Washington an ambassador who wears high-heeled shoes with gold toes. Somehow it doesn't compute, the thousand-watt smile, the manicured nails, the British diplomas and blue-blood pedigree that, had it not been for Mogul interlopers a few centuries back, would have made her, the ambassador says wistfully, a princess.
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NEWS
October 17, 1998 | From Associated Press
Talks between Pakistan and India, the world's newest nuclear powers, focused Friday on "peace and security" to prevent a decades-long dispute over the Kashmir region from boiling over into a more serious conflict. The discussions brought the two countries' foreign secretaries together for the first time since their nations conducted underground nuclear tests in May that drew condemnation and sanctions from the world.
WORLD
May 11, 2003 | Chris Kraul and Shankhadeep Choudhury, Special to The Times
U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Richard L. Armitage thanked the prime minister of India on Saturday for his peace overture to Pakistan, saying he was hopeful it will lead to neighborly relations between the bitter enemies. Armitage ended a three-day swing through South Asia here in the Indian capital, where he encouraged officials to follow through on the initiative this month by Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee. The U.S.
NEWS
October 23, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bitter Pakistani election campaign widely seen as a referendum on ousted Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto entered its final phase here early today as tens of thousands of her supporters welcomed her into enemy territory. Bhutto's crowd far outnumbered that of a chief opponent, Nawaz Sharif, even though Pakistan's second-largest city is his longtime power base and a key battleground in Wednesday's election. Provincial officials had refused to give Bhutto a rally permit.
NEWS
September 14, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a day of intense diplomatic efforts that increasingly focused on Osama bin Laden, the Bush administration presented Pakistan with a detailed list of demands to help track the Afghanistan-based militant. The U.S. received a broad promise of "unstinted cooperation" from Pakistan and expects a quick response to the detailed list. According to diplomatic sources and administration officials, the requests include: * Access to and assistance from Pakistani intelligence.
NEWS
July 6, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A deal struck in Washington to end the border war on the Indian subcontinent failed to take hold Monday, as fighting raged in the Himalayas and the Pakistani military vowed to keep its ground. A day after Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, meeting with President Clinton in Washington, agreed to rein in troops who sparked a bloody and dangerous skirmish with India, few signs emerged that the deal was falling into place.
NEWS
March 17, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Clinton Administration proposal to ship F-16 jets to Pakistan, despite that country's suspected nuclear weapons program, is raising Indian hackles and pumping even more venom into already embittered relations on the subcontinent. From the Pakistani point of view, if America does not allow delivery of the high-performance fighters, for which Pakistan has already paid more than $900 million by U.S. count, it is no better than a double-dealer.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ousted Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto's emotion-packed bid to regain power collapsed in a stunning defeat Wednesday in violence-marred Pakistani parliamentary elections. Bhutto stopped short of conceding, however, bitterly charging that the election was "stolen" by the military-backed caretaker government and opposition. "We expected fraud, but there has been massive fraud across the country," Bhutto told a TV reporter at her home in the southern city of Larkana. ". . . I feel sorry for freedom."
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The brief history of Pakistan often seems like a movie reel repeating the same sad frames: A nation elects a leader, the leader goes bad and the soldiers come in to clean up the mess. For 52 years, this impoverished nation of 140 million people has endured weak civilian leaders and military dictators, each one promising to improve on the disaster left behind.
NEWS
July 18, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two-month border war between India and Pakistan ended Saturday when the last of the Pakistani-backed intruders went home, leaving relations between the two countries in ruins and the issues that divide them as intractable as ever. Indian officials reported Saturday that the last of the 1,000 forces who crossed the border from Pakistan in May had left their mountaintop positions along a strategic Indian highway in Kashmir and retreated into Pakistan.
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