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Malibu Lagoon

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2009 | Martha Groves
Blaming small-scale septic systems for causing much of the pollution in Malibu's watershed, the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board will vote Thursday whether to ban the systems in a large portion of central and eastern Malibu. Under the proposed moratorium, no new septic systems would be permitted, and owners of existing systems would have to halt wastewater discharges within five years. Far from a mundane issue, the staff-recommended proposal has prompted heated debate and threats of legal action in Malibu, where almost all homes and businesses rely on septic systems.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2009 | Martha Groves
If regional water quality officials approve a proposed ban on septic systems in central Malibu as expected, residential property owners in the affected area would be on the hook for $1,000 a month to pay for a centralized wastewater treatment system, city officials said Monday. Commercial property owners benefiting from the treatment system could be required to lay out significantly more, the city said. Malibu said in a statement that such a system would cost $52 million, more than three times the $16.7-million projection that the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board has suggested at recent community workshops.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2009 | Martha Groves
Veteran surfers joined forces with Malibu city leaders Monday to launch construction of Legacy Park, the centerpiece of the city's $50-million-plus plan to clean up polluted water in Malibu Creek, Malibu Lagoon and the famed Surfrider Beach. "Legacy Park is going to act as Malibu's environmental cleaning machine," said Mayor Andy Stern. "It will reduce pollution from stormwater, improve the city's water quality, and allow residents to enjoy the health and recreation benefits of an open space area and a clean ocean."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2009 | Martha Groves
The city of Malibu has issued a request for bids to build its proposed Legacy Park on Pacific Coast Highway in the heart of the Civic Center area. The project would create an educational park for the community, with a variety of coastal habitats, and would serve as a storm water treatment facility. Interested contractors will be able to view more than 200 sheets of plans to help formulate their bids, which are due by July 16. Construction of the eight-acre storm water detention pond and park will involve earthwork and grading, paving, walkways, landscaping and irrigation systems, bridges, educational kiosks, donor acknowledgments and art. Some environmental groups, including Heal the Bay, have criticized the project because it does not also address the area's serious wastewater problems, which are blamed largely on aging septic systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2005 | Daryl Kelley, Times Staff Writer
First came the guardhouse, then the guards and now the gates. The view up Malibu's Serra Road these days looks more like a high-security entrance to an exclusive compound than a reception area for a public park. The security measures are intended to keep trespassers and looky-loos out of a bucolic canyon dotted with multimillion-dollar estates, including those of Hollywood celebrities and at least one billionaire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2004 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Television tycoon A. Jerrold Perenchio has tentatively agreed to donate his 10-acre private golf course in downtown Malibu to the state after his death and the death of his wife, so long as the state retroactively approves the course, which was built 20 years ago without proper permits. The California Coastal Commission on Thursday gave preliminary approval to the deal, which would preserve one of the largest undeveloped tracts along the Malibu shore as permanent open space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2003 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
No signs point the way to Perenchio Park, a pitch-and-putt golf course hidden behind an enormous rock wall in the heart of Malibu. Few people aside from the immediate neighbors in the exclusive Malibu Colony knew it existed. That is, until a pair of environmental activists tipped off the California Coastal Commission, which has since determined the private golf course, owned by media tycoon A. Jerrold Perenchio, was built 20 years ago without a permit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They stand shoulder to shoulder, oceanfront homes in the heart of Malibu, turning their backs on the clamor of Pacific Coast Highway and effectively walling off miles of beach from the public. On the ocean side, decks and balconies unfurl toward the rosy glow of the setting sun. Kayaks and catamarans lie unsecured on the sand. Owners and their guests stroll the solitary strand, pant legs rolled up, cocktails in hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2001
Reasonable people wonder who are the Ahmanson Ranch developers trying to fool with their feel good ads? The poor red-legged frog featured in Washington Mutual's full-page ads running daily in many major newspapers probably doesn't realize that a misplaced and legally questionable development is about to wreak havoc on his habitat. This development will also wreak havoc on the water quality of the entire Malibu Creek Watershed--including Malibu Lagoon and Surfrider Beach. The frog doesn't drive and is therefore ignorant of the fact that the Ahmanson developers are going to increase traffic anywhere from 15% to 50% to the 101, depending on the estimates given by experts at the Aug. 25 hearing on the Ahmanson project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2000
Re "High-Tech Team Seeks to Clean Up Creek," Aug. 16. As a young girl back in the 1930s, I often played and, yes, canoed in the Malibu Lagoon and its creek with my friend and neighbor Sylvia Adamson, whose parents, the Merritt Adamsons, owned the property and its adjacent Mediterranean estate--now a state-run tourist attraction. Alongside the creek, on the other side of the bridge, Sylvia's mother raised sheep as a hobby and her grandmother, May Knight Rindge, Malibu's largest landholder, was building an enormous family compound on the site of the present Serra Retreat.
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