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Malik Hasan

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BUSINESS
April 4, 1995 | DAVID R. OLMOS and NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Health care executive Malik M. Hasan has prospered by driving hard bargains with doctors and hospital executives. Now he will have to do more of the same as the chairman-designate of the company to be formed through the merger of WellPoint Health Networks and Health Systems International. The success of the proposed $1.8-billion deal, announced Monday, will depend partly on the new company's ability to find an estimated $200 million in cost savings annually.
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NATIONAL
September 1, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - Before Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan represented himself at his court-martial last month, charged with carrying out the bloody rampage at Ft. Hood, many wondered: What would he say? Victims scheduled to testify spoke of their concern that Hasan would bait them during cross-examination. Legal experts speculated that the Army psychiatrist might pontificate or otherwise disrupt the proceedings at the central Texas Army base. But in the end, the American-born Muslim - who shouted " Allahu akbar ," Arabic for "God is great," before opening fire - said and did very little in the courtroom.
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BUSINESS
August 8, 1998 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Malik M. Hasan, an HMO chieftain who infuriated the state's physicians with his cost-cutting demands and became a symbol of greed to industry critics, stepped down Friday as chief executive of Foundation Health Systems. Foundation, one of the nation's largest managed-care companies, said Hasan had decided to retire and that he would be replaced by Jay M. Gellert, an investment banker and close associate of Hasan's.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas - A military jury handed down a rare death sentence Wednesday to Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, convicted of murder last week for the mass shooting at this central Texas Army post that killed 13 people and wounded more than 30 others. The jury president, the highest-ranking colonel on the panel, announced the sentence in the afternoon as more than half a dozen victims' relatives looked on from the gallery. Hasan, who refused to shave his beard for religious reasons, stared at the colonel as she explained that for the multiple murders, he should be forced to forfeit all pay, dismissed from the military and "put to death.
NATIONAL
August 23, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas - A military jury enters its second day of deliberations Friday in the murder case of Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, charged in connection with a mass shooting here four years ago that killed 13 people and wounded dozens more. Hasan, 42, faces 13 charges of premeditated murder and 32 charges of attempted premeditated murder. If convicted, he could face the death penalty. The Army psychiatrist, who represented himself at trial, admitted to the shooting in his opening statement and did little to challenge prosecutors.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas -- A military jury has sentenced Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan to death in connection with the mass shooting at this central Texas Army post four years ago that killed 13 and wounded more than 30. Hasan, 42, an Army psychiatrist, was convicted last week of 13 counts of premeditated murder and lesser charges in connection with the attack on Nov. 5, 2009. On Wednesday, the same jury of 13 officers, all Hasan's rank or higher, deliberated about two hours before sentencing him to die. The jury president, a colonel and the highest-ranking juror, announced the sentence.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - A military judge ruled Thursday that an Army psychiatrist charged in the deadly 2009 shooting at Ft. Hood in Texas will stand trial in three months. Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, 42, is charged with 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 counts of attempted murder in connection with the rampage at the sprawling central Texas Army base, the worst mass shooting on a U.S. military installation. After repeated delays, lawyers for both sides recently indicated that they were prepared to begin trial in April, but the judge decided to take more time before seating a jury.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2013 | By Michael Muskal and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas -- An Army major facing the death penalty told a military court here Tuesday that he was the shooter in a 2009 rampage that killed 13 soldiers and that he acted after switching sides from U.S. goals. In an opening statement that lasted less than two minutes, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan made his first comments at his court-martial on 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 counts of attempted premeditated murder for those killed and wounded in the Ft. Hood attack of Nov. 5, 2009.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas -- After years of delays and just two weeks of testimony, military prosecutors rested their case Tuesday in the court-martial of Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan. Hasan, 42, is charged with 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 counts of attempted premeditated murder in connection with the shooting at this central Texas Army base on Nov. 5, 2009. If convicted, the Army psychiatrist could face the death penalty. Prosecutors summoned nearly 90 witnesses and submitted hundreds of pieces of evidence to build their case against Hasan, arguing that the American-born Muslim was motivated by radical militant beliefs to plan his attack on fellow soldiers after he had been ordered to deploy to Afghanistan.
NATIONAL
August 9, 2013 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Sgt. 1st. Class Maria Guerra was heading to lunch in her office at this central Texas Army base on Nov. 5, 2009, when she heard the first shots of what would become the deadliest shooting on a U.S. military installation. Guerra, a tough officer who curses when she's angry, opened the door and shouted, cussing and demanding to know what was going on in her building. Someone yelled: "Shooter, shooter!" That's when Guerra saw the figure in fatigues with a handgun. Guerra was among 15 witnesses who described the carnage in graphic detail Thursday at the court-martial of Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan.
NATIONAL
August 26, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas - When Angela Rivera and other Army wives heard there had been a shooting at this central Texas Army post four years ago, they immediately called their husbands' cellphones. No one answered. On Monday, as testimony began at the sentencing of the man convicted of murder in the Nov. 5, 2009, rampage, Rivera and other wives relived the uncertain hours of what many here call Five November. The shooting left 13 dead and more than 30 others wounded. At the time, Rivera had no way of knowing whether her husband, Maj. L. Eduardo Caraveo, was among the casualties.
NATIONAL
August 23, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas - A military jury enters its second day of deliberations Friday in the murder case of Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, charged in connection with a mass shooting here four years ago that killed 13 people and wounded dozens more. Hasan, 42, faces 13 charges of premeditated murder and 32 charges of attempted premeditated murder. If convicted, he could face the death penalty. The Army psychiatrist, who represented himself at trial, admitted to the shooting in his opening statement and did little to challenge prosecutors.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas -- After years of delays and just two weeks of testimony, military prosecutors rested their case Tuesday in the court-martial of Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan. Hasan, 42, is charged with 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 counts of attempted premeditated murder in connection with the shooting at this central Texas Army base on Nov. 5, 2009. If convicted, the Army psychiatrist could face the death penalty. Prosecutors summoned nearly 90 witnesses and submitted hundreds of pieces of evidence to build their case against Hasan, arguing that the American-born Muslim was motivated by radical militant beliefs to plan his attack on fellow soldiers after he had been ordered to deploy to Afghanistan.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2013 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The jury that will decide the fate of Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, accused of gunning down fellow soldiers at this central Texas military base, is an elite group of Army officers operating under a military legal system that must strike a delicate balance. Military law and courtroom rules strive to promote fairness to the defendant and free inquiry among jurors of varying ranks, despite constant reminders of the importance of rank, right down to the jurors' seating arrangements. Military law also guarantees that there will not be a hung jury.
NATIONAL
August 9, 2013 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Sgt. 1st. Class Maria Guerra was heading to lunch in her office at this central Texas Army base on Nov. 5, 2009, when she heard the first shots of what would become the deadliest shooting on a U.S. military installation. Guerra, a tough officer who curses when she's angry, opened the door and shouted, cussing and demanding to know what was going on in her building. Someone yelled: "Shooter, shooter!" That's when Guerra saw the figure in fatigues with a handgun. Guerra was among 15 witnesses who described the carnage in graphic detail Thursday at the court-martial of Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2013 | By Michael Muskal and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas -- An Army major facing the death penalty told a military court here Tuesday that he was the shooter in a 2009 rampage that killed 13 soldiers and that he acted after switching sides from U.S. goals. In an opening statement that lasted less than two minutes, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan made his first comments at his court-martial on 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 counts of attempted premeditated murder for those killed and wounded in the Ft. Hood attack of Nov. 5, 2009.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2013 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The jury that will decide the fate of Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, accused of gunning down fellow soldiers at this central Texas military base, is an elite group of Army officers operating under a military legal system that must strike a delicate balance. Military law and courtroom rules strive to promote fairness to the defendant and free inquiry among jurors of varying ranks, despite constant reminders of the importance of rank, right down to the jurors' seating arrangements. Military law also guarantees that there will not be a hung jury.
NATIONAL
August 4, 2013 | By David Zucchino
LILLINGTON, N.C. - Alonzo Lunsford is blind in his left eye. Half his intestines have been surgically removed. He has trouble walking. He has been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. A powerfully built man who stands 6-foot-9, Lunsford was shot seven times at Ft. Hood in Texas in November 2009 in the worst mass shooting on an American military base. Now he's steeling himself for the day when he will come face-to-face in military court with the man accused of shooting him, Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan.
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