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Malpractice Suits

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NATIONAL
September 18, 2009 | Peter Nicholas
The White House rolled out a modest program Thursday examining ways to discourage frivolous medical malpractice lawsuits, but what was meant as a bipartisan overture was quickly denounced by Republicans and business and consumer groups as an empty gesture. The Obama administration said that it would offer $25 million in grants to identify practices that would reduce medical errors, scale back malpractice insurance premiums and spare doctors from nuisance litigation. Traditionally, Democrats have opposed changes in malpractice law, protecting the interests of trial lawyers who are a major source of fundraising support.
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BUSINESS
August 28, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Personal-injury lawyer Larry H. Parker is best known for his tough-talking television commercials and a catchy slogan: “We'll fight for you.” But a Riverside County woman who was badly injured in a 2011 traffic collision contends that Parker's firm made a series of mistakes that left her with no hope of compensation for her injuries. She has filed a legal malpractice lawsuit against Parker's firm. Selena Burns of Hemet suffered numerous broken bones and is confined to a wheelchair more than one year after the accident, said her attorney, Eric Dubin.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1997
The May 4 Orange County Voices article by Haydee V. Tillotson regarding the trial lawyers' attack on the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act, specifically the medical malpractice limit on damages for "pain and suffering," was a good summary of the facts but left out one important issue. As managed care becomes near universal in California, doctors are under intense pressure to reduce patients' access to expensive technology and specialist referral. Many of these cases involve what could be called "defensive medicine."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2010 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's proposal for the University of California and its medical schools to manage healthcare for the state's prison inmates, including via the Internet, received significant criticism Thursday at a hearing before the university's regents. Leaders of the union that represents current prison doctors were the most vocal opponents, warning that UC medical staff would face frequently violent patients, higher-than-expected costs and malpractice lawsuits challenging long-distance online diagnoses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1986
To say that the greed of trial lawyers serves a social conscience inert everywhere else, as Murray Kempton did in his column (Editorial Pages, July 22), has to rate as one of the most ludicrous statements the usually astute Kempton has ever made. Pity us all if the only social conscience extant in this country today is contained in the force of greed of our trial lawyers. Nobody ever claimed that each and every physician is a paragon of virtue, or even infallible, or even faultless.
NEWS
May 19, 1987 | Associated Press
A bill that would allow military personnel to file medical malpractice suits against the federal government for peacetime injuries suffered in military hospitals was approved Monday by the House Judiciary Committee. The measure was approved on a voice vote and sent to the House floor, despite objections raised by the Defense and Justice departments at a hearing in March. The Pentagon's general counsel, H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fewer than 2% of people who are harmed by incompetent medical care file malpractice suits, suggesting that the legal system rarely holds bad doctors accountable for their mistakes, according to a Harvard study published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine. While hardly any patients who have truly suffered from poor care get compensated, the study found, most of the lawsuits that do get filed are based on questionable claims.
NEWS
January 18, 1985 | United Press International
A record number of malpractice suits and large legal judgments are triggering a crisis in health care costs and services, an American Medical Assn. official warned Thursday. The AMA, which outlined the problem in a new report, said Americans are filing more than three times as many medical malpractice claims than they did a decade ago, and are winning record judgments.
NEWS
October 29, 1991 | HELAINE OLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New studies by a Harvard University group and the Urban Institute have challenged some longstanding contentions by physicians who assert that they often are unfairly victimized by the wave of medical malpractice suits.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1993 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National Medical Enterprises Inc., continuing efforts to put its legal woes behind it, will pay approximately $15 million to settle 66 malpractice suits brought by former patients at its psychiatric hospitals in Texas, company officials said Tuesday. The cases represent more than half of the more than 100 civil suits brought by patients claiming physical mistreatment, abuse, fraud and conspiracy at NME psychiatric facilities. Since Jeffrey C.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2009 | Peter Nicholas
The White House rolled out a modest program Thursday examining ways to discourage frivolous medical malpractice lawsuits, but what was meant as a bipartisan overture was quickly denounced by Republicans and business and consumer groups as an empty gesture. The Obama administration said that it would offer $25 million in grants to identify practices that would reduce medical errors, scale back malpractice insurance premiums and spare doctors from nuisance litigation. Traditionally, Democrats have opposed changes in malpractice law, protecting the interests of trial lawyers who are a major source of fundraising support.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2009 | STEVE LOPEZ
They came with toothaches, limps, blurred vision and sniffling children. Inglewood's Fabulous Forum, where Magic and Kareem once operated, became a MASH unit Tuesday for 1,500 uninsured people who began queuing up at 2 a.m., desperate for medical attention. What an inspiration it was to see teams of volunteer doctors and nurses helping patients as part of a charity called Remote Area Medical. And what an indictment, as well, that a group known for its work in Appalachia was needed in the land of palm-shaded mansions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2007 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County supervisors voted Tuesday to pay $3.3 million to settle two lawsuits against county hospitals -- one brought by a 19-year-old woman who was blinded by an overlooked brain tumor and another by a man who suffered serious neurological damage after his face was impaled at a construction site. The board gave the county health department a month to submit plans to prevent similar errors in the future. Supervisors approved $1.8 million for Nicole Davis, who visited Hubert H.
HEALTH
May 15, 2006 | From Times wire reports
People who file lawsuits against doctors accusing them of medical mistakes rarely do so frivolously, and those who file trivial claims generally receive no payout, researchers have found. "Portraits of a malpractice system that is stricken with frivolous litigation are overblown," said David Studdert, who led a team of researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health in examining 1,452 randomly selected U.S. lawsuits.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2005 | Warren Vieth, Times Staff Writer
President Bush demanded congressional action this year to rein in "junk" lawsuits against doctors and hospitals, saying Wednesday that the time had come to impose federal restraints on a system traditionally left to the states. Taking his tort reform campaign to an Illinois county known as a hotbed of civil litigation, Bush said the prospect of big jury awards in medical malpractice cases was causing insurance rates to soar and doctors to abandon their practices.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2004 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
With emergency room doctors and nurses swirling around her in November, Michelle Geyer stroked and kissed her 7-year-old daughter's pale face, urging her to live. "I was telling her, 'We're going to go to Disneyland. We're going to get through this, honey. You can do it, baby. Come on,' " Geyer recalled. Jessie Marie Geyer didn't make it. According to autopsy results, Jessie died of septic syndrome caused by a bacterial infection that is commonly treated with antibiotics.
NEWS
April 3, 1985
A new computer service will enable physicians in Chicago to supplement a patient's medical history with his history of filing malpractice suits. Physician's Alert is scheduled to begin checking court records, for a fee, next week, company president Michael Eckstein said. The American Medical Assn. reported in January that malpractice suits have increased threefold over the last decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
A jury has decided that attorney Milton Grimes should pay $1.2 million to the mother of a man fatally shot by Gardena police after a jury found the lawyer failed to properly litigate her civil wrongful-death case. Grimes, best known for representing Rodney G. King in his civil action, took over Lorine Harris' case from another attorney in October 1995, said attorney Joseph L. Shalant, who tried the legal malpractice case against Grimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2004 | Jean-Paul Renaud, Times Staff Writer
A man who sued his Fountain Valley veterinarian for malpractice has been awarded nearly $39,000 for the death of his dog. Five years and $375,000 in attorney's fees later, Marc Bluestone, 61, of Sherman Oaks, persuaded a Superior Court jury in Santa Ana that his dog's veterinarian, Craig Bergstrom, was guilty of malpractice.
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