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NEWS
May 10, 2001 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Winding down from an odyssey of fence-mending with Muslims and Orthodox Christians, Pope John Paul II basked in the adoration of his own flock Wednesday at a Mass for about 200,000 Roman Catholics, more than half this island nation's population. "Mamma mia, my favorite pope!" exclaimed 104-year-old Ines Borg, crossing herself and joining the tumultuous applause as John Paul blessed the crowd from a raised wooden altar by the Mediterranean shore.
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NEWS
May 9, 2001 | From Associated Press
Returning to one of the bastions of his church, Pope John Paul II began the final leg of a historic pilgrimage Tuesday with words of praise for Malta's Christian devotion that stretches back to converts of the apostle Paul. "You have a spiritual and moral heritage," the pope said after arriving in the Mediterranean island nation, which he first visited 11 years ago. The stop comes near the end of a six-day trip that included landmark gestures of reconciliation in Greece and Syria.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
Children carrying red and white carnations sang hymns Friday as a Malta village buried Rosie Attard, the conjoined twin who died as a result of an operation that allowed her sister to live. Rosie and her sister, born in August with fused spines that left them joined at the abdomen, were known to the world by the names given them at a British hospital to protect their identities: Mary and Jodie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2000
John F. Malta Milo, a retired land surveyor, died at his home in Ventura on Saturday. He was 92. Milo was born March 18, 1908, in Warns, the Netherlands, and grew up in Holland. Milo worked for the Dutch government as a land surveyor for 20 years. During that time he traveled from Holland to New Jersey, then to Australia and the East Indies and back to Holland. He was married on June 2, 1932.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2000 | Associated Press
Six locations popular as tax havens with Americans and Europeans have promised to end within five years the practices that gave them that reputation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arvid Pardo, a former Maltese diplomat and USC expert on international law who proposed a radical treaty to ensure the world's peaceful use and sharing of the oceans' bounty, died June 19 in Seattle. He was 85. As Malta's representative to the United Nations, Pardo launched the world on a 17-year odyssey toward a pact that would alter the long-standing doctrine of "freedom of the seas."
NEWS
October 25, 1998 | FRANCES D'EMILIO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
No matter how stubborn the stain, U.S. diplomats boycott what many people consider the best dry cleaners in town. Buying a loaf of one of Malta's best-selling breads potentially could land American visitors in jail or a $250,000 fine. Paying for a stay at certain hotels on this tourist-destination island also puts Americans technically at risk for prosecution. So does eating at Malta University's cafeteria for exchange students from the United States.
NEWS
September 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
The leader of Malta's Nationalist Party claimed victory Sunday in a parliamentary election and said he would move quickly to strengthen ties between this tiny island nation and the rest of Europe. Eddie Fenech Adami said he would revive Malta's bid for membership in the 15-member European Union, an effort that had been frozen by the Labor Party of Prime Minister Alfred Sant.
TRAVEL
October 12, 1997 | KARIN DOMINELLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A nine-day Mediterranean Archeology travel study program hosted by the OTS Foundation for Education and Historic Preservation in Malta leaves Los Angeles May 9. Participants will learn about civilizations that left behind stone monuments. The earliest structure has been dated back to nearly 6,000 years ago, and artifacts exist from 1,000 years before that. Robert H. Tykot, assistant professor of Anthropology at the University of South Florida, will lead the group.
TRAVEL
January 23, 1994
How can anyone possibly write an article on Malta ("Malta, a Mediterranean Mecca," Jan. 9) without including the valor of those involved in fighting off Axis forces during World War II and saving this tiny (and highly strategic) island that was vital to victory in the Middle East. Malta holds the dubious distinction of being the most bombed and devastated area in history. PETER HUME Lake Forest
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