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OPINION
October 23, 2011 | By Mark Bowden
Earlier this month, researchers discovered a cunning strain of malware, dubbed the Lurid Downloader, that has been systematically and silently stealing data from carefully targeted government computers in 61 countries. The discovery was made by Trend Micro, a Tokyo-based computer security company, which identified the invader as a version of a well-known strain of malware that exploits vulnerabilities in the popular programs Adobe Reader and Microsoft Office. It inserts itself into a computer's core, and then phones home to a remote operator who moves continually from domain to domain on the Internet to avoid detection.
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BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Six technology executives including Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg and Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt met with President Obama on Friday to discuss National Security Agency spying in the wake of revelations that the agency may have infected millions of computers around the world with malware. Also at the meeting were CEOs Reed Hastings of Netflix, Drew Houston of Dropbox, Alex Karap of Palantir Technologies and Aaron Levie of Box. The CEOs of Yahoo, Microsoft, LinkedIn and Twitter could not make the meeting.
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BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The National Security Agency has reportedly used automated systems to infect user computers with malware since 2010, according to a Wednesday report. And at times the agency pretended to be Facebook to install its malware. The NSA has been using a program codenamed TURBINE to contaminate computers and networks with malware "implants" capable of spying on users, according to The Intercept , which cited documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden. Between 85,000 and 100,000 of these implants have been deployed worldwide thus far, the report said.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The National Security Agency has reportedly used automated systems to infect user computers with malware since 2010, according to a Wednesday report. And at times the agency pretended to be Facebook to install its malware. The NSA has been using a program codenamed TURBINE to contaminate computers and networks with malware "implants" capable of spying on users, according to The Intercept , which cited documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden. Between 85,000 and 100,000 of these implants have been deployed worldwide thus far, the report said.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Russians have turned stealing money from Android smartphone users into an entire industry, according to a security app maker's investigation. Lookout Inc. studied how 10 Russian groups convince users to download what appears to be a legitimate mobile app. During the supposed download process, a computer code is run that sends a premium text message from the user's phone. Premium text messages result in an extra fee at the bottom of phone bills, typically about $3 to $18 in this case.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
If someone on Skype asks you "lol is this your new profile pic?" don't click the link. A type of malware known as Dorkbot is going around the video-calling service tricking people into being scammed by asking that question, in both English and German. Once users click on it, they are redirected to download a file from hotfile.com that holds the malware. The worm was discovered by Trend Micro, a security firm that wrote about the malware Monday. Trend Micro says that once infected, computers become part of a botnet, or a network of computers controlled by hackers to execute denial of service attacks, in which attackers try to jam a website by getting large numbers of computers to contact it at the same time.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Oracle has issued an update for its Java software to fix a security flaw so severe that it led the U.S. government to issue a note last week urging computer users to disable Java. The vulnerability makes it possible for hackers to install malware that allows them to commit identify-theft crimes or add infected computers to networks that can be used for cyber attacks. Because of the severity of the vulnerability, Oracle said it "strongly recommends" that users update their software as soon as possible.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- An Eastern European ring of hackers reportedly are responsible for hacking into at least 40 companies including Apple, Facebook and Twitter in an effort to steal company secrets, research and intellectual property that they can sell. The origin of the malware attacks was reported by Bloomberg News, which cited as sources two people familiar with the invasions. Investigators tracked at least one server being used by the hacker ring to a hosting company in the Ukraine, Bloomberg said.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Security researchers are warning Android users not to install versions of Flappy Bird found in alternative app stores as they may contain malware that could lead to unwanted charges on their phone bills. Flappy Bird is a mobile game that rose to popularity over the last few months but was suddenly removed from both the Apple App Store and Google Play last weekend. Since then, some Android users have turned to alternative app stores to install Flappy Bird clones that have the same name and icon and deliver the same game play.
WORLD
May 31, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Computer virus experts at Kaspersky Lab, acting with the blessing of the United Nations, were searching for a villain dubbed the Wiper when they came across a much more menacing suspect requiring a new moniker: Flame. The malicious program left experts all but certain that a government sponsor intent on cyber warfare and intelligence gathering was behind some suspicious activity, in part because of the likely cost of such a sophisticated endeavor. "We entered a dark room in search of something and came out with something else in our hands, something different, something huge and sinister," Vitaly Kamlyuk, a senior antivirus expert at Kaspersky Lab, said in an interview Wednesday.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Security researchers are warning Android users not to install versions of Flappy Bird found in alternative app stores as they may contain malware that could lead to unwanted charges on their phone bills. Flappy Bird is a mobile game that rose to popularity over the last few months but was suddenly removed from both the Apple App Store and Google Play last weekend. Since then, some Android users have turned to alternative app stores to install Flappy Bird clones that have the same name and icon and deliver the same game play.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON - A Target Corp. official told a Senate committee that a massive security breach affecting up to 110 million holiday shoppers lasted three days longer than previously thought. Chief Financial Officer John Mulligan disclosed the latest information in written testimony at a hearing Tuesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is considering ways to protect consumers' personal information. The malicious software that enabled hackers to steal information from credit and debit cards from Nov. 27 to Dec. 15 was later found on 25 additional checkout machines and continued to collect shoppers' information for three more days, Mulligan wrote.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google has released a new version of its Chrome Beta Web browser that tells users which of the websites they've opened is emitting sound. The new feature uses a small speaker icon that displays to the left of the small "X" users click on to close a tab. As soon as audio starts playing the icon appears, and it goes away when audio stops. "Have you ever shuffled through your tabs to figure out where that sound or music is coming from? We hear you!" Google said in a blog post . "With today's latest Chrome Beta release, you can now visually scan your tabs for a speaker icon to quickly find the offender.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Microsoft will officially retire its Windows XP operating system early next year, but Google on Wednesday announced it will continue to support its Chrome browser for the platform through at least early 2015. The Mountain View, Calif., Web giant announced it will keep sending out updates and security patches to the Windows XP version of Google Chrome "until at least April 2015. " That's good news for Windows XP users, who will stop receiving the same type of support for the operating system from Microsoft.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Russians have turned stealing money from Android smartphone users into an entire industry, according to a security app maker's investigation. Lookout Inc. studied how 10 Russian groups convince users to download what appears to be a legitimate mobile app. During the supposed download process, a computer code is run that sends a premium text message from the user's phone. Premium text messages result in an extra fee at the bottom of phone bills, typically about $3 to $18 in this case.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Asked in a survey to distinguish malicious emails from legitimate ones, nearly everyone in a group of 53 undergraduates failed. The results from a new study by researchers at North Carolina State University found most people are overconfident in their ability to spot phishing attacks directed at them. “Everyone's susceptible,” said psychology professor Christopher Mayhorn , one of the study's authors. “But there's relationships that make some people more susceptible.” PHOTOS: Top smartphones of 2013 Before taking the test, 89% of the group had said they were “confident" in their ability to tell the difference between an authentic email and one sent by a scammer.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Here's a roundup of alleged cons, frauds and schemes to watch out for. When a stranger calls: The FBI is warning consumers to exercise caution with telemarketers. When consumers disclose personal or financial information over the telephone, they increase the risk of becoming victims of telemarketing fraud, according to an advisory on the FBI website. Be particularly careful if the caller says any of the following: "Act now or the offer won't be good. " "You've won a free gift, vacation or prize.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON - A Target Corp. official told a Senate committee that a massive security breach affecting up to 110 million holiday shoppers lasted three days longer than previously thought. Chief Financial Officer John Mulligan disclosed the latest information in written testimony at a hearing Tuesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is considering ways to protect consumers' personal information. The malicious software that enabled hackers to steal information from credit and debit cards from Nov. 27 to Dec. 15 was later found on 25 additional checkout machines and continued to collect shoppers' information for three more days, Mulligan wrote.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Leaving the front door unlocked is a risky move. And that risk is the same with smartphones running Android, Google's open operating system. Android phones come with unlocked doors, allowing them to install applications found almost anywhere online. But when downloading applications from somewhere other than the Google Play store, Android device users must be more cautious than ever, according to Juniper Networks third annual Mobile Threats Report . People who create viruses and other malicious software, or malware, for mobile devices have targeted Android because it has become the dominant mobile operating system worldwide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department issued a warning Friday about an uptick in complaints about an Internet virus that locks computers and demands payment after falsely alleging the user is guilty of a crime. The FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center first issued an alert in August about the virus known as Reveton ransomware virus, a malware program that can engage as soon as a victim clicks on a compromised website. The virus then locks the victim's computer and displays a message claiming that there has been a violation of federal law. The computer often displays a fake message purporting to be from the FBI or Department of Justice, claiming that the user's Internet address has been associated with child pornography sites or other illegal activity.
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