Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsManaged Care
IN THE NEWS

Managed Care

NATIONAL
October 20, 2005 | From the South Florida Sun-Sentinel
Florida Gov. Jeb Bush's plan to test a new kind of Medicaid coverage in two counties won federal approval Wednesday. U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt approved the state's application for a Medicaid waiver, which still needs final endorsement from the Florida Legislature.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2005 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
State leaders on Tuesday put off until next year highly controversial plans to move 554,000 elderly, blind and disabled Medi-Cal beneficiaries into managed care, costing California $90 million in federal incentives. The decision was part of an overall agreement about how to divvy up $18 billion in new federal funding over the next five years in a way that would ensure no hospital loses money. The Legislature is expected to approve the deal by the end of this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2005 | Jordan Rau and Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writers
Half a million elderly, blind and disabled Californians now enrolled in Medi-Cal -- including all of those in Los Angeles County -- would be shifted into managed care as part of a complex deal with the federal government, the Schwarzenegger administration announced Wednesday. The pact dictates how California can spend $18.4 billion in Medicaid money over five years and amounts to an overhaul of hospital financing in the state.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2005 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
HMOs, once the top choice for Americans who get healthcare as a job perk, are so last century. Tightly controlled health maintenance organizations have steadily lost ground over the last decade to preferred provider organizations, which offer greater choice of physicians and hospitals and direct access to specialists -- though at a higher price.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2004 | From Associated Press
Surging healthcare costs have prompted a return to some unpopular money-saving measures that were scaled back after the backlash against managed care during the late 1990s, according to a new study. Requirements such as referrals for specialists and pre- authorizations for some medical services are quietly reappearing in some health plans, according to the study, released Wednesday and published in the policy journal Health Affairs.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2004 | Vicki Kemper, Times Staff Writer
Only a fraction of the nation's seniors understand the new Medicare prescription drug law, and the more they learn about it, the less they like it, according to a survey released Thursday by the Kaiser Family Foundation. The complex law, which gives private insurance companies billions of dollars to lure beneficiaries away from fee-for-service Medicare and into managed care, will require more than 40 million seniors and disabled persons to make difficult choices about their healthcare.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2003 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court took up the long-running national dispute over managed health care Monday, saying it would decide whether workers and their families can sue their medical plans for providing allegedly substandard care. The justices' ruling, due by next summer, will determine the legal rights of more than 130 million Americans who receive subsidized medical care through employer- or union-sponsored plans. The high court agreed to hear a pair of cases from Texas.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2003 | James F. Peltz and Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writers
In a deal that would create the nation's largest for-profit health insurer, Thousand Oaks-based WellPoint Health Networks Inc. agreed Monday to be acquired by Anthem Inc. of Indianapolis for $14.3 billion in cash and stock. The two companies are the leading providers of Blue Cross and Blue Shield managed-care plans. WellPoint, which owns Blue Cross of California, is the largest health insurer in the state, with 6.7 million members.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2003 | From Associated Press
The managed-care industry asked a federal judge in Miami for a second time to throw out a lawsuit by 600,000 doctors across the nation who say they are routinely cheated on payments for their services. U.S. District Judge Federico Moreno said he might issue a partial decision before the end of September. He asked an industry attorney to "show me how I can be consistent" by dismissing the lawsuit now when he accepted the bulk of it more than two years ago.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2003 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Molina Healthcare Inc. of Long Beach, reporting its first quarterly earnings as a publicly traded company, gave its investors some good news Monday. The managed-care firm, which specializes in serving low-income people on Medicaid, said its second-quarter earnings jumped 30% from a year earlier, largely because of higher enrollment and lower expenses as a percent of revenue. Molina posted a profit of $10.9 million, or 57 cents a share, up from $8.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|