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Mandatory Drug Testing

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NEWS
August 9, 1986 | JANET CLAYTON, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Tom Bradley, continuing his anti-drug theme as he campaigns for governor, said Friday that he would be willing to volunteer to be tested for drugs, although he opposes mandatory drug tests for all government employees. "I have no objection to taking the drug test, but I don't think I should impose that on every member of my Administration," Bradley said at a press conference. "I think it's an intrusion on civil rights and civil liberties of people."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2003 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Larry Tannahill was an unlikely rebel. A farmer, husband and father of two boys, he had spent his entire life in his hometown of Lockney, Texas, without challenging the values of a farming community where cotton and high school football are royalty. But when the local school board adopted mandatory drug testing for students in 2000, Tannahill balked. He believed that the board had violated his rights as a parent and was forcing him, in effect, to tell his sons that he suspected them of drug use.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mandatory drug testing for all 8,000 sworn peace officers in the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department was approved Tuesday by the Board of Supervisors. Sheriff Sherman Block supported the move, saying, "Drug abuse has now become so pervasive in our society that it is essential that we send a message to the community that those men and women they have entrusted with their safety are absolutely drug free." The sheriff said there is no drug abuse problem within the department.
NEWS
March 20, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With drug use on the rise again, the Supreme Court justices strongly hinted Tuesday they are likely to uphold mandatory drug testing for most or all high school students. During a sharp back-and-forth argument, several conservative justices said they, like most parents, want to keep "the druggies" out of their local schools. Apparently agreeing, Justice Stephen G. Breyer compared drug testing to metal detectors at school doors--a new but necessary means of keeping schools safe.
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III, signaling the Administration's increasing frustration over its inability to solve the drug crisis by keeping illicit narcotics out of the country, Tuesday proposed mandatory drug testing for all who are arrested for any crime. "I would like to see the day where every person arrested is subjected to a urine test," Meese told the police policy board of the U.S. Conference of Mayors.
SPORTS
May 9, 1985 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The head of the Major League Players Assn. said Wednesday that the issue of mandatory drug testing for major league baseball players could be reconsidered under an existing agreement. Donald Fehr, acting executive director of the baseball players' union, said that if Commissioner Peter Ueberroth wants major league players to join the testing program, he and the owners should ask that the issue be reconsidered under terms of a drug agreement reached last year.
SPORTS
August 22, 1985 | Associated Press
Baseball Commissioner Peter Ueberroth hopes to implement mandatory drug-testing in the winter leagues in Latin American countries, the New York Times reported. "I'm going to go outside the United States and Canada, into the winter leagues," Ueberroth said in a story in today's editions of the newspaper. "There are places where players play where people look the other way. "I don't know how much leverage I'll have. I'm running into resistance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1987 | ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writer
About 60 mayors, police chiefs and other government officials began a two-day conference Thursday in San Diego on the subject of "Winning the War on Drugs: What Cities Must Do." Sponsored by the U.S. Conference of Mayors, the seminar at the U.S. Grant Hotel is intended to update officials on the funding that local governments can expect to receive from the new Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986. Aside from hearing about the financing intricacies of the new law, the officials--including some from U.S.
SPORTS
January 31, 1985 | Mike Littwin
Almost everyone agrees that drug abuse is a critical problem in American society today. Maybe there's a solution. Why not have mandatory drug tests for everyone ? Let's clean this thing up once and for all. Throw all the offenders in jail or in drug rehab centers or maybe just kick 'em out of the country. Isn't it time to stop pussy-footing around on this issue? OK. Maybe that's not the answer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1990 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of Los Angeles' largest police union, in an unexpected turnaround, have agreed to allow mandatory drug testing of all sworn officers and will put the Police Department's proposal before its membership later this month, the union's president said Tuesday. If the Los Angeles Police Protective League's 7,800 members approve the plan, the drug testing could begin as early as June 1, LAPD officials said.
NEWS
November 9, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court agreed Thursday to decide whether all high school students who participate in extracurricular activities beyond sports can be forced to undergo random drug tests. A ruling on the issue, which can be expected by next spring, should clarify how far public school officials can go in requiring drug tests of students. The justices have said that students have lesser privacy rights than adults.
NEWS
May 2, 2000
Should schools--public and private--be allowed to institute mandatory drug testing for high school athletes? MARY MULLIGAN San Clemente, Girls' Basketball Coach I feel all athletes, and all other extracurricular participants, should be subjected to random drug testing during their season of sport. I also feel all coaches should be tested as well.
NEWS
October 5, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court cleared the way Monday for mandatory drug testing for schoolteachers, rejecting a constitutional challenge that called the program "an exercise in symbolism." The justices turned down an appeal filed by the National Education Assn., the largest teachers' union, which argued that educators should not be forced to undergo urine testing unless there is evidence of a drug problem. The court's action in the school case came on the opening day of its new term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1999 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a society where everyone from bus drivers to supermarket cashiers is subject to random drug testing, it was only a matter of time before someone approved testing for local officials. That time has come in South El Monte. The tiny San Gabriel Valley community is believed to be the first in California to approve voluntary, random drug tests for its City Council members. The council's decision has ignited a debate about whether such tests are truly voluntary for elected officials.
NEWS
March 23, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, limiting drug testing of students, refused Monday to allow a school district to test all those who violate its disciplinary rules. Although individuals who appear to be under the influence of drugs can be tested at school, officials may not routinely test groups of students, under the ruling that the high court let stand. The Constitution's 4th Amendment protects students, as well as adults, from unreasonable searches by public officials, the ruling stressed.
NEWS
March 3, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday allowed the government to continue drug tests on federal white-collar employees whose occasional access to the White House complex could in theory pose a security risk to the president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1990
The Ventura County grand jury has recommended drug and alcohol testing for county employees, estimating that 18% to 20% may have substance-abuse problems. Many county officials call the recommendations intrusive. What do you think? Oscar Fuller Ventura County assistant sheriff We've taken the position that we're opposed to mandatory drug testing of our department employees. We have not had any significant evidence of abuse among employees in the Sheriff's Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1996
Regarding early release of L.A. County jail inmates, May 20: I have represented individuals who were committed for one year due to use of methamphetamine. Due to overcrowding, they were released after a few months and placed in the work program. Even though the sentence included probation with mandatory drug testing, no testing took place while they were in the work program, as that was deemed "in custody." This policy is plainly stupid. Addicts require a period of detoxification and counseling, along with testing, or they will offend.
SPORTS
November 29, 1995 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Taking what it called "a dramatic step," world swimming's governing body Tuesday approved tougher sanctions on drug use with an eye to next summer's Olympics. FINA voted in Rio De Janeiro to extend to four years a mandatory ban on first-time steroid users. The current suspension is two years. The change means swimmers who flunk drug tests will automatically miss an Olympic Games.
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