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Manhattan Beach Ca Development And Redevelopment

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To outsiders, it's just a giant hole, notable mainly because of its location three blocks uphill from the ocean. But to residents of Manhattan Beach, the former site of the now-defunct Metlox Pottery plant has become a battlefield of competing civic hopes and values.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1997
The city and an unidentified buyer are in the process of purchasing the old Metlox Pottery site--a vacant plot of land adjacent to downtown Manhattan Beach. The city is set to buy the 65,000-square-foot south parcel from the Santa Fe Railroad Co. A developer is set to buy the north parcel, which is owned by a private investor. Though there are no formal plans on how to develop the land, city officials hope that the two plots will be combined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Manhattan Beach, a slice of yuppie heaven in the South Bay that's populated with a plethora of lawyers, doctors and investment bankers, demand for cellular phone service is--and this is a bit of an understatement--quite high. On the other hand, desire for a 125-foot-high cellular relay tower in a residential neighborhood is--and this is being most generous--quite low.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1989 | TED JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Heather Balagia took her 3-year-old daughter, Sarah, and 5-year-old son, Terence, to Polliwog Park earlier this week on one of their favorite adventures--feeding the ducks and geese. To their surprise, the ducks and geese at the park's one-acre pond were gone. Not much of the pond was left either. The city of Manhattan Beach, responding to complaints of odor and polluted water, started a $426,000 project to improve the pond's water quality about two weeks ago.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
A giant crane is tilting up 90-ton sound-stage walls at Manhattan Beach Studios today, as a commercial real estate project with a lot to say about the changing face of Southern California industry takes a key step forward. The $50-million project to build 11 sound stages and office structures is seen as one more confirmation that the entertainment industry is driving the Southern California economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1990 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The infamous McMartin Pre-School was bulldozed into history Tuesday, existing now only in the memories of former students, some of whom insist they were molested there, and former teachers, who insist they provided loving care. The sun broke through the haze and parents cheered as heavy equipment lifted the roof off at about 11 a.m. By day's end only three green walls were still standing, one of them boldly emblazoned in large spray-painted letters: "We believe the children."
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