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Manuel Camacho Solis

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NEWS
February 8, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In any given week, Manuel Camacho Solis may be the black sheep of Mexican politics or his nation's great conciliator. This particular week, he is the man who is bringing Indian rebels to the negotiating table, giving President Carlos Salinas de Gortari the chance to save Mexico from a bloody Central American-style guerrilla war. This week, Manuel Camacho Solis is a national hero. "In Mexico, the perception of power is power," said political scientist Denise Dresser, a former student of his.
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WORLD
June 30, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
State elections this weekend in Mexico are shaping up as a revealing test of whether the once-dominant Institutional Revolutionary Party, on a steady march to retake the presidential palace, has changed its old autocratic ways. The party, which ruled Mexico with an iron fist for 70 years but lost the presidency in 2000, insists it has reformed and modernized, and it is handily capitalizing on public anger at rising violence and a sluggish economy to make significant gains. The PRI, its initials in Spanish, is expected to coast to victory in the all-important race for governor in Mexico state and is leading in opinion polls in two other states that will vote Sunday.
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NEWS
April 11, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The worst smog ever to shroud Mexico City is also casting a pall over the political fortunes of its mayor, who is the presumed front-runner to succeed President Carlos Salinas de Gortari in 1994. Manuel Camacho Solis has done more than any previous mayor to tackle the city's wretched pollution. And yet, when ozone levels soared to a record high last month, he was blamed for failing to solve what is, in the short term at least, an unsolvable problem.
NEWS
October 14, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
Manuel Camacho Solis, a former stalwart of Mexico's ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, resigned from the party to work toward creating a centrist coalition. "I am in favor of a real political change to take us to an advanced democracy," said Camacho Solis, who formerly served as mayor of Mexico City and peace envoy to rebels in the southern state of Chiapas.
NEWS
October 14, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
Manuel Camacho Solis, a former stalwart of Mexico's ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, resigned from the party to work toward creating a centrist coalition. "I am in favor of a real political change to take us to an advanced democracy," said Camacho Solis, who formerly served as mayor of Mexico City and peace envoy to rebels in the southern state of Chiapas.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | Reuters
Government peace envoy Manuel Camacho Solis said Saturday that he is ready to meet Indian insurgents to seek the release of a former governor kidnaped in the early hours of their New Year's uprising in Chiapas state. Camacho, speaking to reporters in San Cristobal de las Casas, did not disclose when or where the meeting would take place.
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chiapas peace envoy Manuel Camacho Solis ended months of controversy over his alleged presidential aspirations by announcing Thursday that he is retiring as a negotiator and leaving politics--at least for now. Before reading his letter of resignation at a news conference, Camacho Solis defended himself against the attacks of his own party's presidential candidate, Ernesto Zedillo.
NEWS
March 23, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peace envoy Manuel Camacho Solis said Tuesday that he will not run for this nation's presidency, ending speculation that he would use his negotiations with Indian rebels in southern Mexico as a platform to launch a campaign that was certain to split the ruling party. Instead, Camacho Solis said he will put all his effort into finding a peaceful solution to the peasant uprising that has left at least 145 people dead in the southern state of Chiapas.
NEWS
March 24, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This nation's much-vaunted political stability will be sorely tested by Wednesday's assassination of Luis Donaldo Colosio, the ruling party's presidential candidate and the man who was widely expected to assume the next six-year term as Mexico's leader. Mexican officials had expected 1994 to be hailed as their country's entry into the First World as a full partner with the United States and Canada in the North American Free Trade Agreement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1994
The death of Luis Donaldo Colosio (March 24) has left many people bereft. Many will miss him. Many questions will remain forever unanswered: Why was he murdered, could he have won this year's presidential elections, what direction would Mexico's political turmoil have taken? Colosio, an active member of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) since a teen-ager, was to head Mexico into the 21st Century, continuing the party's six-decade rule over Mexico (a party which has been described by intellectuals as the longest dictatorship of modern times--an authoritarian reign involved in political scandals, fraudulent elections, student and Indian assassinations)
NEWS
June 18, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The resignation of Chiapas peace envoy Manuel Camacho Solis is a troubling sign that, in this presidential election year, politicking has taken precedence over finding a solution to the conflict in southern Mexico, analysts said Friday. Further, they expressed concern that the risk of a return to armed confrontation may have increased because of the hard line the two leading presidential candidates have taken toward the rebels, who rejected a government peace proposal last week.
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chiapas peace envoy Manuel Camacho Solis ended months of controversy over his alleged presidential aspirations by announcing Thursday that he is retiring as a negotiator and leaving politics--at least for now. Before reading his letter of resignation at a news conference, Camacho Solis defended himself against the attacks of his own party's presidential candidate, Ernesto Zedillo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1994
The death of Luis Donaldo Colosio (March 24) has left many people bereft. Many will miss him. Many questions will remain forever unanswered: Why was he murdered, could he have won this year's presidential elections, what direction would Mexico's political turmoil have taken? Colosio, an active member of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) since a teen-ager, was to head Mexico into the 21st Century, continuing the party's six-decade rule over Mexico (a party which has been described by intellectuals as the longest dictatorship of modern times--an authoritarian reign involved in political scandals, fraudulent elections, student and Indian assassinations)
OPINION
March 27, 1994 | Sergio Munoz, Sergio Munoz is the editor of Nuestro Tiempo, The Times' weekly Spanish-language edition. He interviewed Manuel Camacho Solis in his office near the Mexican White House.
Jan. 1, shots were fired in Chiapas, in southern Mexico. The grandchildren of Emiliano Zapata--Indians, peasants, the dispossessed--had taken up arms, demanding land, liberty and justice. Surprised by this military action, President Carlos Salinas de Gortari responded in kind. Yet, the Zapatistas held the moral high ground, and public opinion turned in their favor.
NEWS
March 25, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Carlos Salinas de Gortari called for calm and unity in his country Thursday as shocked, angry Mexicans mourned Luis Donaldo Colosio, the ruling party's assassinated presidential candidate. Thousands of grieving people filed past Colosio's body, which lay in state at the headquarters here of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI as it is known.
NEWS
March 24, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This nation's much-vaunted political stability will be sorely tested by Wednesday's assassination of Luis Donaldo Colosio, the ruling party's presidential candidate and the man who was widely expected to assume the next six-year term as Mexico's leader. Mexican officials had expected 1994 to be hailed as their country's entry into the First World as a full partner with the United States and Canada in the North American Free Trade Agreement.
WORLD
June 30, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
State elections this weekend in Mexico are shaping up as a revealing test of whether the once-dominant Institutional Revolutionary Party, on a steady march to retake the presidential palace, has changed its old autocratic ways. The party, which ruled Mexico with an iron fist for 70 years but lost the presidency in 2000, insists it has reformed and modernized, and it is handily capitalizing on public anger at rising violence and a sluggish economy to make significant gains. The PRI, its initials in Spanish, is expected to coast to victory in the all-important race for governor in Mexico state and is leading in opinion polls in two other states that will vote Sunday.
NEWS
June 18, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The resignation of Chiapas peace envoy Manuel Camacho Solis is a troubling sign that, in this presidential election year, politicking has taken precedence over finding a solution to the conflict in southern Mexico, analysts said Friday. Further, they expressed concern that the risk of a return to armed confrontation may have increased because of the hard line the two leading presidential candidates have taken toward the rebels, who rejected a government peace proposal last week.
NEWS
March 23, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peace envoy Manuel Camacho Solis said Tuesday that he will not run for this nation's presidency, ending speculation that he would use his negotiations with Indian rebels in southern Mexico as a platform to launch a campaign that was certain to split the ruling party. Instead, Camacho Solis said he will put all his effort into finding a peaceful solution to the peasant uprising that has left at least 145 people dead in the southern state of Chiapas.
NEWS
February 8, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In any given week, Manuel Camacho Solis may be the black sheep of Mexican politics or his nation's great conciliator. This particular week, he is the man who is bringing Indian rebels to the negotiating table, giving President Carlos Salinas de Gortari the chance to save Mexico from a bloody Central American-style guerrilla war. This week, Manuel Camacho Solis is a national hero. "In Mexico, the perception of power is power," said political scientist Denise Dresser, a former student of his.
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