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Manuel Cuevas

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NEWS
November 10, 1989 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his showroom of sequins and serapes, Manuel Cuevas--the clothier of cowboy cool--flips through color glossies of duded up Dwight Yoakam, the country-Western singer. There's DY in a royal blue CJ--that's designer talk for California Jacket--a 30-year-old jacket style reinvented for Yoakam by Mexican-born Manuel, who is known far and wide by his first name only. Flip. Here's DY in a cherry-red CJ. Flip. And DY in a CJ that is pure JC--Johnny Cash black.
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NEWS
February 16, 2006
In your article on Western clothing ["A Western That Is Set in New York," by Valli Herman, Feb. 9], designer Manuel Cuevas and the celebrities who have worn his beautiful creations, you failed to mention Dwight Yoakam, who almost single-handedly brought a whole new audience to Manuel's designs in the 1980s and '90s. Yoakam burst on the scene like a house on fire with a hillbilly sound that redefined modern country music and an image to match: the tight, silver concho adorned; tattered jeans that fit like a glove; the short, bejeweled bolero jackets; the long Indian-blanket overcoats.
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NEWS
February 16, 2006
In your article on Western clothing ["A Western That Is Set in New York," by Valli Herman, Feb. 9], designer Manuel Cuevas and the celebrities who have worn his beautiful creations, you failed to mention Dwight Yoakam, who almost single-handedly brought a whole new audience to Manuel's designs in the 1980s and '90s. Yoakam burst on the scene like a house on fire with a hillbilly sound that redefined modern country music and an image to match: the tight, silver concho adorned; tattered jeans that fit like a glove; the short, bejeweled bolero jackets; the long Indian-blanket overcoats.
NEWS
February 9, 2006 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
WHEN you have a clothing line that appeals to rock 'n' roll icons, country-western stars, fine artists and U.S. presidents, you know you're doing something right. For more than 50 years, Manuel Cuevas has been creating the spangled cowboy couture worn by Elvis (remember the white rhinestone jumpsuit?), the Beatles (in their Sgt. Pepper phase), Dolly Parton, Johnny Cash and the Rolling Stones (the tongue and lips? Cuevas designed them). Presidents Reagan and George W.
NEWS
February 9, 2006 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
WHEN you have a clothing line that appeals to rock 'n' roll icons, country-western stars, fine artists and U.S. presidents, you know you're doing something right. For more than 50 years, Manuel Cuevas has been creating the spangled cowboy couture worn by Elvis (remember the white rhinestone jumpsuit?), the Beatles (in their Sgt. Pepper phase), Dolly Parton, Johnny Cash and the Rolling Stones (the tongue and lips? Cuevas designed them). Presidents Reagan and George W.
NEWS
October 16, 2000 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES FASHION WRITER
Seventeen designers. Three hundred-fifty guests. And, damas y caballeros, mucho Latino flair. That was the scene at the black-tie "Hispanic Designers" gala that featured the creations of Latino designers, most from the Los Angeles area. Sponsored by the nonprofit Washington, D.C.-based Hispanic Designers Inc., the Thursday show at the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel was the second stop of a three-city tour that began in Washington last month and moves on to Miami in November.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2006 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
The prevailing dark trend and its strong showing on the runway left many of the lighter collections feeling completely irrelevant and out of step. But there were some designers who pulled it off, with refreshing looks inspired by Highlands shooting parties, modern art and even femmes fatales. Ralph Lauren Lauren never strays far from his aristocratic base, and this season his aristocrats went on a Highlands shooting party.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2006 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
THE first weekend of Fashion Week is traditionally relaxed. It's a chance for lesser-known designers to get their feet wet, and many of the shows are small affairs, held in downtown galleries and loft spaces, instead of under the tents at Bryant Park. Top editors don't always turn out and neither do the crowds. But even damp weather couldn't stop the frenzy from building as soon as the fall season started here on Friday. Kenneth Cole had everyone up at the ungodly hour of 9 a.m.
NEWS
October 19, 2001 | By BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not hard to imagine President Bush in the Oval Office, thumbs hooked 'round his belt loops and a 10-gallon hat perched atop his head, trumpeting the battle cry: "We're gonna smoke 'em out!" With cowboy diplomacy in the White House and flag fashion all over the streets, the stage has been set for a new exhibit about a purely American art form: Wweestern wear.
MAGAZINE
October 1, 2000 | PETER MCQUAID, Peter McQuaid is a freelance writer based in Los Angeles
Twenty-two-year-old Brandy DeJongh is Miss Rodeo America 2000 and, as such, an official spokesperson for the Professional Rodeo Cowboy Assn. She loves her parents, God, her horses (Hobby's Major and Horse) and the friends she's kept from high school. She has been to Paris, New York and Las Vegas, but her favorite place on earth right now is the place she grew up, Leona Valley.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his showroom of sequins and serapes, Manuel Cuevas--the clothier of cowboy cool--flips through color glossies of duded up Dwight Yoakam, the country-Western singer. There's DY in a royal blue CJ--that's designer talk for California Jacket--a 30-year-old jacket style reinvented for Yoakam by Mexican-born Manuel, who is known far and wide by his first name only. Flip. Here's DY in a cherry-red CJ. Flip. And DY in a CJ that is pure JC--Johnny Cash black.
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