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Manuel Zelaya

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WORLD
May 29, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Alex Renderos, Los Angeles Times
Manuel Zelaya, the president of Honduras ousted in a military-led coup nearly two years ago, returned home from exile Saturday, greeted by a large, heated crowd and a nation still bitterly divided by tension and violence. With Zelaya's return, Honduras hopes to end its political and diplomatic isolation and overcome one of the ugliest periods of recent Central American history. Zelaya pledged to immediately reengage in politics and will probably lead a new party. "This is the moment to declare victory for the democratic process in Latin America," Zelaya proclaimed.
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WORLD
December 1, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Thousands of leftists marched in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa on Sunday to protest - peacefully but vehemently - the Nov. 24 election of a conservative presidential candidate that they say was marked by fraud. The protesters, many sporting red baseball caps or waving red banners, were led by Xiomara Castro, the candidate of the left-wing Free Party, and her husband, Manuel Zelaya, who was ousted from the presidency in a 2009 coup. They appeared beside a casket containing the body of Jose Antonio Ardon, a Free Party activist who was gunned down Saturday, the Telesur TV channel reported.
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WORLD
July 24, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
Deposed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya jumped behind the wheel of a white Jeep in the Nicaraguan capital of Managua on Thursday and roared north toward the border, launching a second attempt to return home and reclaim power. With negotiations deadlocked, Zelaya said the time had come for him to make his move. He said he hoped to cross into Honduras from northern Nicaragua on Saturday.
WORLD
November 24, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras - Hondurans were voting for president Sunday, choosing from the most diverse slate of candidates in national history but in an election overshadowed by deadly violence and endemic poverty. Voters overwhelmingly said they hoped the next government would radically change the country, still reeling from the devastation of a military coup in 2009, although there was wide disagreement on how and who could best do it. Mayra Valladares, a 66-year-old homemaker, said she cast her ballot for the ruling National Party's Juan Orlando Hernandez because he would be toughest on crime.
WORLD
July 1, 2009 | Alex Renderos and Tracy Wilkinson
Ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya on Tuesday continued to build support for his return home, but the country's de facto rulers said he'd be arrested the minute he set foot on national territory. As Zelaya addressed a supportive United Nations audience in New York, Hondurans in Tegucigalpa were demonstrating against and, in smaller numbers, in favor of the deposed leftist leader. Zelaya was flown to exile in Costa Rica early Sunday after soldiers removed him from his home. Honduran Atty.
WORLD
July 8, 2009 | Paul Richter and Tracy Wilkinson
Honduras' ousted president and the officials who exiled him have agreed to try to resolve their conflict through a U.S.-endorsed mediator, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced Tuesday. Signaling an expanding U.S. effort, Clinton said the two sides had agreed to talks supervised by Costa Rican President Oscar Arias, who was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1987 for his efforts to broker peace accords in Central America.
WORLD
January 28, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Manuel Zelaya was inaugurated as Honduras' president with promises to fight corruption and help criminals and gang members become useful citizens. Zelaya, a wealthy agricultural landowner, has railed against alleged government corruption and promised to do more for Hondurans with few resources. Zelaya, 56, replaces Ricardo Maduro, who led a government crackdown that threw thousands of gang members into overcrowded jails.
WORLD
July 22, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Honduras' interim government ordered Venezuelan diplomats to leave the country as the international community threatened new sanctions on the Central American nation if negotiations fail to resolve the crisis following the overthrow of the president. Venezuelan Embassy Charge d'Affaires Ariel Vargas said he received a letter from the Honduran Foreign Ministry ordering his diplomats to leave in 72 hours. Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has been the most vociferous critic of the government that overthrew his ally, Manuel Zelaya, on June 28. The interim government accused Venezuela of meddling in Honduran affairs and of threatening to use its armed forces against Honduras, according to a copy of the letter obtained by the Associated Press.
WORLD
December 1, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Thousands of leftists marched in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa on Sunday to protest - peacefully but vehemently - the Nov. 24 election of a conservative presidential candidate that they say was marked by fraud. The protesters, many sporting red baseball caps or waving red banners, were led by Xiomara Castro, the candidate of the left-wing Free Party, and her husband, Manuel Zelaya, who was ousted from the presidency in a 2009 coup. They appeared beside a casket containing the body of Jose Antonio Ardon, a Free Party activist who was gunned down Saturday, the Telesur TV channel reported.
WORLD
October 18, 2009 | Associated Press
Leaders of a bloc of leftist Latin American and Caribbean governments urged the international community Saturday to reject the presidential election planned by Honduras' interim government next month. The leaders of the Bolivarian Alliance for the Americas group also denounced Colombia's plan to give the U.S. military expanded use of bases in that South American nation, calling it a threat to the region's security. In a joint statement issued at the end of the two-day ALBA meeting, the leaders criticized the coup-installed government in Honduras and urged the world's nations to continue pressing for the reinstatement of ousted President Manuel Zelaya.
WORLD
November 23, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras - A new party is challenging the business and political establishment that has ruled Honduras since civilian government took charge a generation ago. And its candidate is the wife of a former president deposed by those interests in a 2009 coup, a dramatic throwback to years past. One of her opponents is the military general who overthrew her husband. Such are politics in Honduras, a longtime U.S. ally that has emerged as the prime symbol of an increasingly violent, dysfunctional Central America and now stands as the main transshipment point for Colombian cocaine headed for the United States.
OPINION
June 7, 2011 | By Noah Feldman, David Landau and Brian Sheppard
Is Honduras ready for a return to the community of nations? It has been almost two years since the forced removal of then-President Manuel Zelaya at the hands of the Honduran military. On June 1, the Organization of American States said yes, when it lifted the suspension of Honduras from the organization by a vote of 32 countries in favor and one against. Still, the question on everyone's mind remains: Was there a coup d'├ętat in 2009? Perhaps the better question to ask is: How can similar instability be avoided in the future in Honduras and elsewhere in the region?
OPINION
June 1, 2011
Nearly two years after former Honduran President Manuel Zelaya was ousted in a military coup, he returned home Saturday. His arrival clears the way for the Organization of American States to reinstate Honduras, which had been expelled from the group, during a special session Wednesday. Zelaya's return and Wednesday's expected OAS vote mean Honduras will no longer be a pariah in the hemisphere, which rightfully condemned the coup. But it would be a mistake to conclude that the crisis in that country is over.
WORLD
May 29, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Alex Renderos, Los Angeles Times
Manuel Zelaya, the president of Honduras ousted in a military-led coup nearly two years ago, returned home from exile Saturday, greeted by a large, heated crowd and a nation still bitterly divided by tension and violence. With Zelaya's return, Honduras hopes to end its political and diplomatic isolation and overcome one of the ugliest periods of recent Central American history. Zelaya pledged to immediately reengage in politics and will probably lead a new party. "This is the moment to declare victory for the democratic process in Latin America," Zelaya proclaimed.
WORLD
January 28, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood and Alex Renderos
As a new Honduran president took office Wednesday, former leader Manuel Zelaya flew into exile in the Dominican Republic under a deal that ends months of turmoil since his ouster by the military last summer. Zelaya, accompanied by his wife, two children and President Leonel Fernandez of the Dominican Republic, left Honduras just hours after Porfirio Lobo was sworn in as president. Under an arrangement brokered last week by Fernandez, Zelaya agreed to abandon the Brazilian Embassy in Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital, where he had holed up in September, and to leave the country once his term officially ended.
WORLD
November 30, 2009 | By Alex Renderos and Tracy Wilkinson
Reporting from Mexico City and Tegucigalpa, Honduras -- Hondurans voted Sunday for a new president, many hoping that despite the questions surrounding the election they could restore legitimacy to their national government five months after a military-backed coup ousted President Manuel Zelaya. Official results late Sunday gave an insurmountable lead to Porfirio Lobo, a wealthy businessman from Honduras' political elite and candidate of the conservative National Party. His closest opponent conceded defeat.
WORLD
July 26, 2009 | Associated Press
Deposed President Manuel Zelaya returned to the Honduran border Saturday and announced that he would set up camp there, even as foreign leaders urged him not to force a confrontation with the de facto government that ousted him in a coup last month. Zelaya arrived at a rural frontier crossing and immediately grabbed a megaphone, addressing a crowd of 150 supporters and about as many journalists. He said he would wait near the border and demanded that his family be allowed to meet him.
WORLD
October 15, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
Backers of the coup against Manuel Zelaya made progress Wednesday in negotiations with representatives of the ousted Honduran president, but the key point, Zelaya's reinstatement, remained unresolved. Victor Meza, negotiating on Zelaya's behalf, said delegations representing the two factions had agreed on wording regarding that sticking point. But later, the de facto government of Roberto Micheletti, who replaced Zelaya, said no agreement had been reached. "The dialogue on this point has been cordial and both sides have made important advances," said a statement from the delegation representing Micheletti, according to news reports.
WORLD
November 29, 2009 | By Alex Renderos
Hondurans are voting today in a presidential election that many hoped would restore legitimacy to their national government five months after a military-backed coup ousted President Manuel Zelaya. But Zelaya and his supporters branded the vote illegal and called for a boycott. Streets here in the capital, Tegucigalpa, were calm through the morning. Voting stations reported varying degrees of attendance, so it was difficult early to determine the turnout. Army patrols were seen in some poorer neighborhoods, where support for Zelaya is strongest.
WORLD
November 7, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
Honduran President Manuel Zelaya, ousted in a military-backed coup four months ago, said today that a U.S.-brokered deal to end his nation's political crisis has collapsed. Zelaya pronounced the week-old agreement a "dead letter" after de facto rulers formed a new "reconciliation government" without Zelaya's participation, as the deal had required. "The accord is a dead letter," Zelaya said on a Honduran radio station. "There is no sense in continuing to fool the Honduran people."
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