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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2009 | Esmeralda Bermudez
Manure becomes volatile as it decomposes. Gases, including methane and hydrogen sulfide, are naturally produced as the animal waste breaks down. As weather becomes hotter, methane becomes highly combustible, which can cause the manure to spontaneously explode and sometimes catch fire. Since methane is lighter than air, it builds up on top of unvented areas, such as in closed pits. It is recommended that all areas with manure be ventilated to prevent explosions. Figures showing how many brush fires have been caused by manure explosions are not available, said Ventura County Fire Department spokesman Tom Kruschke.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian and Evan Halper
California is spending nearly $15 million to build 10 hydrogen fueling stations, even though just 227 hydrogen-powered vehicles exist in the state today. It's a hefty bet on the future, given that government officials have been trying for nine years, with little success, to get automakers to build more hydrogen cars . The project is part of a sprawling but little-known state program that packs a powerful financial punch: It spent $1.6 billion last year on a myriad of energy-efficiency and alternative-energy projects.
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BUSINESS
June 3, 2010 | By Brandon Bailey
Giving new meaning to the term "server farm," a team of Hewlett-Packard Co. researchers has come up with a plan for combining cow chips and computer chips to build an environmentally friendly data center — powered by manure. HP scientists have proposed using a biogas recovery system that would convert livestock waste into methane, to be used as fuel to generate electricity for data centers — those cutting-edge computer facilities that serve as the nerve centers for an increasingly Internet-dependent world.
SCIENCE
September 16, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Estimated cases of infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, fell more than 30% in the U.S. between 2005 and 2011, suggesting that heightened efforts to combat the infections in hospitals had made a difference, researchers wrote Monday in the online edition of JAMA Internal Medicine. But another report, also published online in the journal, found that people who lived closest to farms had higher rates of MRSA infection than people who lived farthest from farms - reflecting ongoing concerns about antibiotic use in agriculture and its effects on human health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
An hourlong high-speed chase through eastern Contra Costa County ended when police watched a man drive his 1983 Oldsmobile into a large manure heap. Roy Amador Jr. was deep in it when officers gingerly fished him out of his car Monday night. They booked him for investigation of assaulting two officers, evading police, brandishing a gun and being a felon in possession of a firearm. The chase began soon after 5 p.m.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter
Central California is home to nearly 1.6 million dairy cows and their manure -- up to 192 million pounds per day. It's a mountain of waste and a potential environmental hazard. But for dairyman John Fiscalini, the dung on his farm is renewable gold: He's converting it into electricity. At his farm outside Modesto, a torrent of water washes across the barn's concrete floor several times a day, flushing tons of manure away from his herd of fuzzy-faced Holsteins and into nearby tanks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2001
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday fined Beranna Dairy of Chino $48,000 for contaminating a tributary of the Santa Ana River with an overflow of cow manure, which violates the Clean Water Act. Federal officials said they believe the contamination never seeped past the Prado Dam in Riverside County and did not reach the Pacific Ocean.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Manure: Its stench is as much a trademark to Norco as horses, Old West facades and cowboy hats. Most residents are used to the smell as just part of life in this rural but developing town, where--by some estimates--the horses outnumber the humans. It is the butt of jokes and a source of complaints about cleaning it up each day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1991 | CAROL McGRAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council is accustomed to having citizens call some of their proposals horse manure. But a new one under consideration contains the real stuff. The council's Budget and Finance Committee this week proposed a ban on the dumping of manure in the city's weekly garbage pickups. City Bureau of Sanitation officials support the regulation, saying it would lighten the load at garbage dumps, which are filling up with refuse at an alarming rate.
NEWS
November 28, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anatoly Olosov woke up, washed his hands, sat down to breakfast and began to wonder where that awful stench was coming from. "I smelled and tasted the food, and it was normal," said Olosov, a 60-year-old pensioner. "Then I smelled my hands. And I thought, 'Thank God I didn't brush my teeth.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc
A body found wrapped in a pink plastic bag in a Manhattan Beach park was probably placed there within the last nine days, officials said Friday. City workers moving piles of manure onto a truck discovered the partially decomposed body about 3:30 p.m. Thursday. The manure pile was delivered to a corner of Polliwog Park near a baseball diamond nine days ago, said homicide Lt. Dave Coleman of the L.A. County Sheriff's Department. Investigators believe the body was dumped after the delivery was made.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2013 | Ricardo Lopez
Dairy farmer Ron Koetsier's 1,200 cows produce roughly 90 tons of manure daily, and for the last three decades, he has tried unsuccessfully to turn the stinky dung into energy to power his 450-acre farm in Visalia. He installed a nearly $1-million renewable energy system in 1985 that used the methane from manure to create electricity for his farm. In 2002, he replaced that system with newer technology, but he hit a snag when air-quality standards called for expensive retrofits to reduce air pollution; he eventually shut down the system in 2009.
SCIENCE
April 11, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Michelle O'Malley knows good horse poop when she sees it. While at MIT, the chemical engineer scooped up some manure from Finn, a grass-fed horse at a sustainable farm in Concord, Mass. That offal has led to a potential breakthrough in turning grasses and nonfood crops into an alternative fuel in attempts to wean motorists from fossil fuels and stem man-made climate change. O'Malley, a chemical engineer at UC Santa Barbara, has isolated a fungus that could more easily unlock the sugars used to ferment ethanol.
OPINION
July 15, 2012
Re "Political process worked well," Column, July 12 George Skelton giving our state legislators high marks for "working together" to vote to fund initial bullet train construction reminds me of the little girl who got a large pile of manure for Christmas. She immediately went about shoveling through the pile and, when asked why, replied that with all this manure, there must be a horse in there somewhere. Skelton talks about a "functional" Legislature that votes for a rail system most Californians don't want, a system we can't possible pay for and that makes no logical sense, while cities are becoming insolvent and are beginning to fall like dominoes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The Riverside County city of Norco is best known for being "Horsetown USA," a city with more miles of riding trails than paved roads and a hitching post at the downtown McDonald's. Truth be told, Norco is also on the receiving end of 65 tons of manure produced each day by its population of at least 17,000 horses. So now the city is taking a hard look at a proposal to cash in on all that waste by building a manure-to-energy conversion plant. Designed by Chevron Energy Solutions, the plant would end $17.25-per-ton shipments of manure-filled barrels and dumpsters from Norco homes, stables and horse clubs to leased drying fields about 10 miles away.
NATIONAL
December 25, 2011 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Yadkinville, N.C. Loyd Bryant used to pump manure from his 8,640 hogs into a fetid lagoon, where it raised an unholy stink and released methane and ammonia into the air. The tons of manure excreted daily couldn't be used as fertilizer because of high nitrogen content. The solution to Bryant's hog waste problem was right under his nose - in the manure itself. Graphic: Power-generating hogs A new waste-processing system - essentially a small power plant - installed on his 154-acre farm uses bacteria to digest the waste and burns methane to produce electricity.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2013 | Ricardo Lopez
Dairy farmer Ron Koetsier's 1,200 cows produce roughly 90 tons of manure daily, and for the last three decades, he has tried unsuccessfully to turn the stinky dung into energy to power his 450-acre farm in Visalia. He installed a nearly $1-million renewable energy system in 1985 that used the methane from manure to create electricity for his farm. In 2002, he replaced that system with newer technology, but he hit a snag when air-quality standards called for expensive retrofits to reduce air pollution; he eventually shut down the system in 2009.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2006 | Jonathan Abrams, Times Staff Writer
There isn't a pooper scooper big enough to handle this mess. San Bernardino County officials are in trouble for allowing 31,000 tons of cow manure to be stored at Chino's Prado Regional Park. The problem is that the county leases the land from the Army Corps of Engineers, which didn't care for the 62 million pounds of dung plopped on its flood control basin.
OPINION
May 29, 2011 | By Andrea Wulf
As America's gardeners dig, plant, weed and grow lettuce, beans and tomatoes in their vegetable plots this summer, they are part of a tradition that harks back to the beginnings of the United States. Just by working on a compost pile this weekend, you'll be in good historical company. The first four presidents of the United States — George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison — were all utterly obsessed with manure and recipes for compost. Adams even jumped into a stinking pile when he was America's first "minister plenipotentiary" to Britain in London in 1786.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2011 | By Jason Felch, Los Angeles Times
In Genesis, God gave man dominion over the fish of the sea, over the fowl in the air, over the cattle and "every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth. " On Saturday, man thanked the animals for drawing that lot. There were llamas, goats, geese and sheep. Parakeets, iguanas, goldfish and geckos. Turtles, horses, doves and a 25-pound albino python. And there were dogs. Hundreds of dogs. Dogs in tutus, leis and bunny ears. Dogs in bows and ribbons and T-shirts that read "Momma's Boy. " They had come out on hoof, foot and paw for the annual blessing of the animals on downtown's Olvera Street, filling the cobblestone plaza on Holy Saturday with the sweet smell of fresh hay and manure.
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