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WORLD
May 15, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
The ruling Labor Party suspended a senior lawmaker and a top aide to the head of the opposition stepped down in a scandal over expenses. Both parties have been embarrassed by revelations about lawmakers who have claimed expenses such as cleaning pools and moats, installing a chandelier and buying manure. Legislator Andrew Mackay resigned as a senior advisor to Conservative leader David Cameron. Labor suspended Elliot Morley, a former minister.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1986
With reference to the on hen droppings at Egg City (July 18), there's more than trouble in Egg City--there's callous cruelty to pitiful creatures exploited for expediency and inordinate greed. The "world's largest chicken ranch," Egg City, north of Moorpark, has 3 million chickens, which, in small wire mesh cages (37 henhouses, according to the article) with only wire mesh flooring on which to stand so that their manure droppings can conveniently fall on the concrete floor beneath and be scraped up and hauled away, while the miserable chickens grind out eggs like unfeeling manufacturing tools--all for greed and profit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1993 | ED BOND
Councilman Joel Wachs said he will ask the City Council today to expand a Sun Valley grass-clipping collection program. The councilman also said he will introduce a motion to increase city pickup of horse manure throughout the San Fernando Valley. The city began a pilot program six months ago to continue to make manure pickups to about 1,800 households throughout the Valley after the city switched to an automated service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1991 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ
In a novel bid to dramatize their opposition to the anti-gay crusade of the Rev. Louis Sheldon, AIDS activists placed bags of manure at his office doorstep on Wednesday, which led to a brief shoving match. No one was injured or arrested in the noonday scuffle between three members of ACT UP/Orange County and Sheldon's son, Steve Sheldon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1999 | ROBERTA G. WAX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Compost happens. But not easily or quickly, which can be a problem for farmers who might run afoul of the Environmental Protection Agency's strict rules regarding animal waste disposal. Environmental Products & Technologies Corp. in Westlake Village hopes to ease this waste management problem with a new closed-loop system that is being tested at two dairy farms. Company spokesman David Foster said the four-part system is designed to address the concerns of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1997 | NICK GREEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the wind is calm and the air humid, the scent of this fair city can wrinkle the nose. Or at least in certain sections of the community. Sometimes. Just a bit. But city officials say not to worry. That's just the way Ventura smells. Downtown property owner Andy Chakires said an odor--part sewer and part natural gas--has permeated parts of Ventura in recent weeks. Mind you, 73-year-old Chakires says his sense of smell isn't what it used to be.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1996 | MAYRAV SAAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It could have been pepper spray, but it couldn't have been worse. A 17-year-old stable manager warded off three graffiti taggers at the Arroyo Seco Stables on Monday with nothing more than a stern warning and a handful of horse dung. "I wasn't afraid of picking up the horse droppings, but I was scared to death of [the intruders]," said Heidi Barnes of Highland Park. "Usually I have my pepper spray with me, but I left it at home."
BUSINESS
February 12, 2006 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
Georgina Cano had long resigned herself to the stench from the hog farm just up the road from her rural home. Stagnant lagoons of waste from thousands of squealing pigs fouled the air for miles in this flat stretch of central Mexico. Cano's three children complained and occasionally fell ill, but she figured it came with living in a region that produces much of the nation's pork. Last year, the smell diminished even as the hog production continued.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American scientists were awe-struck when they finally penetrated the sheer cliffs and swept away the scorpions of Navassa Island, one of a handful of remote and anachronistic outposts claimed by the United States. What they found in July were riches far beyond Navassa's million tons of bird dung--a resource once so valued that it accounted for a rebellion by African American workers, complete with ax murders, leading to a landmark Supreme Court decision on U.S. sovereignty there.
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