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January 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The ancient manuscripts feared lost when Islamic insurgents torched a library in the Malian city of Timbuktu might not have been lost after all, according to a report in Time magazine. The insurgents set fire to the library of the Ahmed Baba Institute as they evacuated the city in the wake of an offensive by French troops. Timbuktu's mayor said thousands of documents in the library's collection, many dating from the 14th and 15th centuries, had been destroyed. But Time reporter Vivenne Walt said that her sources in Mali have been telling her privately for months that local residents hid most of the library's collection not long after the insurgents first entered the city last spring.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Many years ago I met a reader who told me a story about one of my own books. My first novel “The Tattooed Soldier” was new then, having recently been published by a small house in upstate New York. I was just coming to terms, then, with the bitter truth that I'd never get rich writing books. But thanks to that one reader, I understood why I had to keep on writing. I haven't stopped since. I remembered that reader this week after coming upon a commentary by the founder of another small, East Coast independent publishing house.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The fate of tens of thousands ancient manuscripts in Mali remained uncertain Monday as French troops liberated the city of Timbuktu from Islamic insurgents who were said to have set fire to the library there. Timbuktu is the last major city occupied by the insurgents, who have held sway there for 10 months, imposing the strict Islamic version of religious law, including carrying out public executions and amputations for crimes. The city, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, was an especially vibrant center of Islamic thought in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013
Collecting rare works that include Italy's Giotto di Bondone and Pacino di Bonaguida, art history expands at the Getty to incorporate manuscript paintings as an essential feature of the early Renaissance story. "Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300-1350," together with its first-rate catalog, is among the most important in an American museum this year. J. Paul Getty Museum, 1200 Getty Center Drive, (310) 440-7300, through Feb. 10. Closed Mondays. http://www.getty.edu
NEWS
April 20, 1986 | United Press International
Two Israelis were detained at Cairo Airport as they were leaving the country with ancient Hebrew-language biblical manuscripts in their possession, the newspaper Al Akhbar said Friday. The newspaper said the Israelis had five large manuscripts and three small ones, as well as three plates with Hebrew inscriptions. The Israelis, identified as David Sasson and Gabriel Jonah, said that the manuscripts dated back before Christ and that they had brought them into Egypt from abroad.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1996 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The Middle Ages, with their religious faith and rigid social structure, seem a time so unlike our own as to be unfathomable. The J. Paul Getty Museum's department of manuscripts regularly casts various beams of understanding on the period with its unfailingly absorbing small exhibitions. The latest is called "Illuminating the Mind's Eye: Memory and Medieval Book Arts." It's startlingly different. At a glance, however, it looks pretty much like other displays in this gallery. Rare volumes rest, open, in cases.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | From Reuters
A group of American, Israeli and Soviet Jews occupied the giant Lenin Library on Saturday, demanding the release of thousands of manuscripts they say were seized from their sect's founding father 70 years ago. But the head of the country's biggest library said he could not hand over the Hasidic books, as this might set a precedent for other pretenders to the state's vast cultural archives.
NEWS
October 10, 1996 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As jury selection proceeds quietly, the second O.J. Simpson trial seems certain not to produce the same kind of rush-to-publish incited by the first trial. And this, in retrospect, gives the blizzard of manuscripts elicited by the first trial a kind of historical significance. Never before have so many wanted to write so much on a subject about which they knew so little, insiders say. And they don't expect the phenomenon to repeat itself any time soon.
NEWS
October 21, 2007 | Tom Hundley, Chicago Tribune
Monika Jaglarz closed the door to the small office and drew the shades. She spread a green velvet cloth over a wooden table and pulled on a pair of white gloves as though about to perform surgery. "I have had a few years of experience with this now," said Jaglarz, a librarian at Krakow's Jagiellonian University. "But I have to admit, the first time my hands were trembling."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2009 | Martha Groves
The story of David, the shepherd boy who slew the Philistine Goliath, became the divinely chosen king of the Israelites and seduced Bathsheba, would be compelling in any era. But for medieval Christians, the poet, harpist and warrior assumed immense importance as an exemplar of piety and penitence, an Everyman on whom they could model their own commitment to God.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
A manuscript of Truman Capote's "Breakfast at Tiffany's" is being auctioned online by R.R. Auctions this week. The manuscript includes Capote's handwritten edits, including one of the most significant: He changes the main character's name to Holly Golightly. Indeed, who would find Connie Gustafson appealing? Holly Golightly is far more attractive. R.R. Auctions describes the manuscript as the "final working draft manuscript for its 1958 Random House publication, 8.5 x 11, consisting of its entire 84 pages, mainly on high-quality goldenrod yellow paper, and copiously annotated throughout by author Truman Capote.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
New Yorkers got a preview Wednesday of an auction rarity: A Nobel Prize for  literature. The 1950  medal  belonged to William Faulkner, one of America's best-known and respected novelists. It comes with a hand-edited draft of Faulkner's acceptance speech; together, auction house Sotheby's expects those items to sell for $500,000 to $1 million . Justin Caldwell, a specialist in books and manuscripts at Sotheby's, told the Associated Press that the auction house had begun speaking to Faulkner's heirs in 2012 after an untitled, unpublished Faulkner short story was found among his literary papers at a family farm in Charlottesville, Va. It's a long list of Faulkner items that will be going up for auction June 11. There are 26 letters and postcards; some of the correspondence was sent from France to his family.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2013 | By David Ng
A valuable 15th century Flemish manuscript acquired by the J.Paul Getty Museum late last year has been placed under an export embargo by British authorities, who hope to keep the object in the United Kingdom.  Britain's cultural minister Ed Vaizey has put a temporary export bar on the manuscript, known as "Roman de Gillion de Trazegnies. " The export bar will prevent the object from leaving Britain while authorities attempt to raise the money needed to keep it in the country. In a statement Vaizey said that it "would be wonderful if the extra time granted by the export allows a buyer to come forward and ensure it remains in a UK collection.” PHOTOS: Arts and culture by The Times In a statement sent to The Times, Getty Director Timothy Potts said "this is normal procedure when purchasing works of art in the United Kingdom.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The ancient manuscripts feared lost when Islamic insurgents torched a library in the Malian city of Timbuktu might not have been lost after all, according to a report in Time magazine. The insurgents set fire to the library of the Ahmed Baba Institute as they evacuated the city in the wake of an offensive by French troops. Timbuktu's mayor said thousands of documents in the library's collection, many dating from the 14th and 15th centuries, had been destroyed. But Time reporter Vivenne Walt said that her sources in Mali have been telling her privately for months that local residents hid most of the library's collection not long after the insurgents first entered the city last spring.
WORLD
January 30, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Ancient manuscripts feared to have been burned as Islamic extremists fled Timbuktu, Mali, appear to have been largely spared, researchers with the Tombouctou Manuscripts Project said Wednesday, citing local sources familiar with the collections. Sources told the research team that some items had been damaged or stolen, but “there was no malicious destruction of any library or collection,” the University of Cape Town-based project said on its website . “The custodians of the libraries worked quietly throughout the rebel occupation of Timbuktu to ensure the safety of their materials.” Reports that the papers were torched spread quickly after the Timbuktu mayor told the Associated Press and other media outlets that the Ahmed Baba Institute had been burned.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
"The Rebel & the King" is a sweetly naive account by the late actor Nick Adams about his friendship with a young Elvis Presley. Adams wrote the manuscript in the late 1950s when he was a rising star in Hollywood. It was recently found in a box of the actor's memorabilia by his daughter, playwright Allyson Adams. She was just 7 when her father was found dead at 36 under mysterious circumstances at his home on Feb. 7, 1968, of a drug overdose. No weapons or pills were found around his body.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2010 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The concept of history in the Middle Ages was not what it is today, as visitors to the J. Paul Getty Museum's new exhibition of manuscripts will see. In an eye-popping image from "Romance of Alexander," a book made in the 1290s, an unknown artist illustrated a yarn about Alexander the Great making an underwater expedition. Enthroned in a glass diving bell, below a whale that gobbles up much of the pictorial space, the regal explorer calmly observes a colony of nude people, earthly beasts and fruit trees living at the bottom of the sea. "The artist really had fun with this," says Getty curator Elizabeth Morrison, who organized the exhibition with Anne D. Hedeman, an art history professor at the University of Illinois in Urbana- Champaign.
NEWS
March 27, 1996 | JEFFERSON MORLEY, THE WASHINGTON POST
It was September 1955. In the backyard of 117 Prince St. in Old Town Alexandria, a newborn boy, swaddled in a blanket, was handed to the man who would become his father. Winston McKinley Scott was 46, handsome, self-assured, his eyes as impenetrable as the secrets they protected. The new dad looked appropriately nervous, appropriately grave, appropriately proud. His wife, Paula, beautiful and doomed, hovered nearby. A Kodak Brownie camera clicked. And so the moment still lives, 40 years later.
WORLD
January 28, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
SEVARE, Mali - French-led forces entered Mali's legendary desert city of Timbuktu on Monday as Al Qaeda-linked fighters fled amid fresh reports of a population terrorized and prized ancient artifacts destroyed during their nine-month occupation. The French troops blocked access to the Saharan city while Malian troops worked to flush out any remaining rebels, French military spokesman Thierry Burkhard told reporters in Paris. He said Timbuktu was not fully under control, though a Malian colonel was quoted later by Agence France-Presse as saying the city had fallen.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The fate of tens of thousands ancient manuscripts in Mali remained uncertain Monday as French troops liberated the city of Timbuktu from Islamic insurgents who were said to have set fire to the library there. Timbuktu is the last major city occupied by the insurgents, who have held sway there for 10 months, imposing the strict Islamic version of religious law, including carrying out public executions and amputations for crimes. The city, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, was an especially vibrant center of Islamic thought in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries.
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