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Marc Caro

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December 17, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
In their spectacular debut film of 1991, "Delicatessen," the French filmmaking team of Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro invented their own universe. A nightmarish dystopia similar to those evoked in Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner," and Terry Gilliam's "Brazil," "Delicatessen" takes place in a condemned apartment building where cannibalism is the order of the day, a tenant lives in a flooded basement where he grows and eats snails, and never a shard of sunlight pierces the gloomy sky.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
In their spectacular debut film of 1991, "Delicatessen," the French filmmaking team of Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro invented their own universe. A nightmarish dystopia similar to those evoked in Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner," and Terry Gilliam's "Brazil," "Delicatessen" takes place in a condemned apartment building where cannibalism is the order of the day, a tenant lives in a flooded basement where he grows and eats snails, and never a shard of sunlight pierces the gloomy sky.
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NEWS
May 10, 1998 | Kevin Thomas
Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro's stunningly surreal 1995 fantasy, a fable of longing and danger, of heroic deeds and bravery, set in a brilliantly realized world of its own. Perched on pilings in the sea outside a port is an amazing and sinister laboratory/aerie of a distraught scientist named Krank (Daniel Emilfork), who is rapidly aging because he lacks the capacity to dream.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Delicatessen" (Fine Arts) is a nightmare comedy with a childlike center of gravity. Set in a truly bleak future--a post-Apocalypse French city where meat-eaters prey on each other and vegetarians are underground insurgents hiding out in the sewers--it adopts a bizarre, playful tone. The macabre imagery and horrific shocks and jolts--the decaying hotel rooms and acts of insane violence--are recorded with a wistful, wackily innocent eye.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
The five Academy Award nominees for animated short film this year split up into two disparate groups: happy meal and white tablecloth. Originally shown with the Disney feature film "Frozen," "Get a Horse!" is the best known and most seen of the bunch. As with "Saving Mr. Banks," Disney has mined its archives to bring us a 3-D meta update of 1920s Mickey Mouse cartoons. It's a blend of folly and nostalgia that won a nomination over "The Blue Umbrella," the whimsical Pixar short that ran before "Monsters University.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1986 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
After two of his duets taped in the early '80s are shown on "Alive From Off Center" tonight (at 10 on Channels 28 and 50; at 11 on Channel 24), post-modern dance-maker David Gordon introduces his "Panel," a more recent, non-dance creation that offers playful commentary on middlebrow arts journalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By David Ng
The director of the 2001 French movie "Amélie" has expressed his displeasure over the planned adaptation of his movie for the musical theater, although he acknowledged that he gave his approval for the stage production. Jean-Pierre Jeunet said in a recent interview with a French radio station that the prospect of a musical version of his movie "disgusts me," and that he only agreed to it for the money, which he plans to give to a children's charity he helps support: Mécénat Chirurgie Cardiaque (Patronage for Cardiac Surgery)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The City of Lost Children" is a stunningly surreal fantasy, a fable of longing and danger, of heroic deeds and bravery, set in a brilliantly realized world of its own. It is one of the most audacious, original films of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1997 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
"Home Alone," with a mouse. When you can pitch a movie idea in five words, you're talking major studio release, and sure enough, here comes DreamWorks' "Mouse Hunt." With a three-inch field mouse in the Macaulay Culkin role, and Nathan Lane and Lee Evans doing the honors as his bumbling pursuers, "Mouse Hunt" is a virtual replay of the original "Home Alone." It's darker, meaner, sillier, more scatological, and, in rare moments, funnier.
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