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March Madness

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SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
They are the schools that bring the madness to March. Underdogs hefting double-digit seeds into the 68-team NCAA tournament that are capable of turning the bracket's orderly lines into chaos. They're expected to be early-round fodder for college basketball's name-brand programs. But one routinely sheds small-school anonymity to pull down a giant and, in the space of a 40-minute basketball game, becomes known the nation over. They waited 29 years for this chance at Mercer. That's in Macon, Ga., for those who aren't Atlantic Sun Conference aficionados.
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SPORTS
April 7, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
Three days ago, the madness returned to Jakob Gollon. The sixth-year senior at Mercer slipped in a DVD and, for the first time, watched his team stun third-seeded Duke last month to open the NCAA tournament. Gollon saw himself on the television screen leading the Macon, Ga., school's first NCAA appearance since 1985. Finally, those 40 bracket-busting minutes of basketball seemed real. “I don't want to watch it too much and take away the awesomeness of it,” Gollon said in a telephone interview.
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OPINION
April 22, 2012 | By John M. Wallace
This year's late winter heat wave over much of the United States, dubbed "March Madness," has been cited as evidence that human-induced global warming is causing the climate system to stray far outside its normal range of variability. The thousands of all-time high temperature records shattered during last month's climate rampage have been likened to home-run records shattered by a baseball player on steroids. It is true that the signature of human-induced global warming is clearly apparent in the increasing number of new high temperature records, which are currently outnumbering low temperature records by a factor of about 3 to 1. Just as a rising tide lifts all ships, a rise in global mean temperature is bound to raise the levels of the highest temperatures.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2014 | By Scott Collins
The producers of "The Good Wife" pulled off a creative shocker for sure. But a ratings coup it probably wasn't. As virtually everyone with a data connection knows by now, CBS' legal drama stunned fans on Sunday with the sudden death of a major character. We're not going to reveal who died or how, but if you don't know and have no care of spoilers you can read all about it here or here . The episode drew 8.9 million total viewers, according to early numbers from Nielsen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2010 | Times Wire Reports
Competition programming reigned last week in prime time, from basketball to singing and dancing, plus other assorted reality fare. The NCAA men's tournament rewarded CBS with bursts of March Madness in the form of robust Nielsen ratings. Those championship games, along with such shows as "Survivor" and "The Amazing Race," helped CBS win the week overall, the Nielsen Co. said Tuesday. Also giving CBS a boost was its new reality hit, "Undercover Boss," which ranked fourth for the week with 16.7 million viewers.
SPORTS
March 19, 2000
Saturday MIDWEST REGIONAL AT MINNEAPOLIS * UCLA 105, Maryland 70 * Iowa State 79, Auburn 60 MIDWEST REGIONAL AT CLEVELAND * Syracuse 52, Kentucky 50 * Michigan State 73, Utah 61 WEST REGIONAL AT SALT LAKE CITY * Wisconsin 66, Arizona 59 * Louisiana State 72, Texas 67 WEST REGIONAL AT TUCSON * Gonzaga 82, St. John's 76 * Purdue 66, Oklahoma 62 Today EAST REGIONAL AT BUFFALO, N.Y. * Oklahoma State (3) vs. Pepperdine (11), 9 a.m. * Temple (2) vs. Seton Hall (10), 11:30 a.m.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
March Madness starts this week and there's a lot of money at stake, including more than $1 billion in wages paid to distracted workers and $2.5 billion in illegal bets. The NCAA basketball tournament will suck 90 minutes out of each workday for 2.5 million workers, according to a report from employment consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas . If last year is any indication, employers will pay out $175 million in wages to workers who are sneaking peeks at games online, checking scores or managing office pool brackets during the first two days of the tournament, according to Challenger.
SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By David Wharton
The teams invited to March Madness might be celebrating, but researchers who monitor academic performance among college athletes are not so thrilled. A study released Monday by the University of Central Florida suggests that, even though the NCAA continues to push for academic progress, the country's top basketball programs are not showing much improvement in the classroom. "This year we seemed to be treading water instead of moving ahead," said Richard Lapchick of the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport.
SPORTS
March 27, 2013 | By Melissa Rohlin
On Thursday, when both Michigan and Michigan State played in the NCAA tournament, apparently a few too many students in one Michigan school district tried to watch the games on their schools' computers. The basketball craze in the Genesee Intermediate School District reportedly prevented some students from being able to access online instructional resources. Workers with Genesee Network for Education Telecommunication, or GenNET, were flooded with complaints, leading the school district to block access to college basketball games over its computers.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
What's a state dinner without the Big Dance? President Obama is scheduled to share one of his greatest passions with David Cameron during the British prime minister's visit to the United States next week: college hoops. Obama plans to travel with Cameron to Dayton, Ohio, on Tuesday night to take in an opening-round game in the men's NCAA basketball tournament, the White House confirmed. The NCAA tournament -- known as March Madness -- has become a fixture of the Obama presidency.
SPORTS
March 21, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
The slew of early NCAA tournament upsets hasn't helped those clinging to the elusive hope of completing a perfect bracket. Just 16 perfect brackets remained in the Quicken Loans Billion Dollar Bracket Challenge through Stanford's upset of New Mexico on Friday, according to the company. Quicken Loans wouldn't disclose how many entries were received, but contest rules capped the number at 15 million, one per person. The going wasn't much better in ESPN's contest. Sixty-six perfect brackets of 11.01 million entries remained.
SPORTS
March 20, 2014 | Nathan Fenno
When Henry V. Porter died in 1975, funeral notices mentioned his induction to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as one of the game's pioneers. Back in the day, Porter had pushed to adopt a ball without laces to make it substantially easier to dribble. And those fan-shaped backboards that are common on schoolyards and playgrounds? Porter designed them. The obituaries also mentioned that he led the band and orchestra at Athens High in central Illinois, and that for decades he worked as an executive for state high school athletic associations.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama teased Ellen DeGeneres about the selfie she took at the Oscars and confessed to leaving his socks and shoes lying around while the first lady is out of town, but before the end of his Thursday appearance on her talk show, he got DeGeneres to put in a plug for the Affordable Care Act. That's Obama's deal with popular media these days as the president enlists help to boost healthcare sign-up numbers before the March 31...
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Chris Feliciano Arnold, guest blogger
The NCAA basketball tournament field is set, and this week an estimated 50 million people will fill out their brackets in a fit of March Madness. Yet almost a year after fans witnessed one of the worst in-game injuries in a generation, college athletes are still fighting for basic healthcare guarantees from the institutions that profit from their sweat and blood. Broken bones come with the territory at high levels of competition, but you know an injury is uniquely awful when the player receives consolatory phone calls from Kobe Bryant, Kevin Durant and Michelle Obama.
SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By David Wharton
The teams invited to March Madness might be celebrating, but researchers who monitor academic performance among college athletes are not so thrilled. A study released Monday by the University of Central Florida suggests that, even though the NCAA continues to push for academic progress, the country's top basketball programs are not showing much improvement in the classroom. "This year we seemed to be treading water instead of moving ahead," said Richard Lapchick of the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport.
SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
They are the schools that bring the madness to March. Underdogs hefting double-digit seeds into the 68-team NCAA tournament that are capable of turning the bracket's orderly lines into chaos. They're expected to be early-round fodder for college basketball's name-brand programs. But one routinely sheds small-school anonymity to pull down a giant and, in the space of a 40-minute basketball game, becomes known the nation over. They waited 29 years for this chance at Mercer. That's in Macon, Ga., for those who aren't Atlantic Sun Conference aficionados.
NEWS
March 18, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Here is a roundup of alleged cons, frauds and schemes to watch out for. March Madness - Not that Southern California college basketball fans have much to worry about, but the Better Business Bureau warns that scams frequently pop up during the men's college basketball playoffs. Fans should be careful when buying tickets on websites such as Craigslist, which does not guarantee that products sold on the site are authentic and does not collect personal information from sellers, the BBB said.
SPORTS
March 17, 2010 | Chris Erskine
Beware the Ides of March Madness, for there is madness upon the land at anytime, though never more than now. "I became insane, with long intervals of horrible sanity," Edgar Allan Poe once famously explained, and we all know how difficult sanity can be this time of year. How's a sane man supposed to pick? Duke or Kentucky? Syracuse or Tennessee? Get a grip. Tennessee? This we know: In the next two weeks, almost anything can happen and probably won't. Some upstart will stage an uprising – Lehigh?
SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By David Wharton
Most college fans would be hard-pressed to tell you anything about the Eastern Kentucky basketball team. The school from just south of Lexington has no All-Americans on its roster. The coach isn't famous and the fight song isn't particularly catchy. But when the NCAA tournament begins later this week, don't be surprised if people start paying attention to - and rooting for - the Colonels. The reason is simple. As forward Deverin Muff says: "They want to see us upset a big school.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -   Any college basketball fan worth their bracket fee will recall the many glorious years of the Big East, from the colorful '80's teams of John Thompson and Lou Carnesecca to, in recent years, the highly competitive games between the likes of Louisville and UConn . They'll also remember the inglorious end to what was once the strongest conference in the nation: desertions by Syracuse and Pitt to the ACC and the splintering...
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