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Marcia Muller

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2009 | By Sarah Weinman
One of the hardest tasks a crime writer faces is how to keep a long-running series fresh. The worst-case scenario is when authors let their detective run amok far longer than necessary, leading to an exasperated fan base that buys new installments out of grudging loyalty. Case in point: The bite and vigor of Robert B. Parker's "Spenser" series has diminished into softened decrepitude, with the Boston private eye more content to sit around and lob gentle sallies at his psychologist lady love Susan Silverman (and marvel at the ones he gets in return)
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2009 | By Sarah Weinman
One of the hardest tasks a crime writer faces is how to keep a long-running series fresh. The worst-case scenario is when authors let their detective run amok far longer than necessary, leading to an exasperated fan base that buys new installments out of grudging loyalty. Case in point: The bite and vigor of Robert B. Parker's "Spenser" series has diminished into softened decrepitude, with the Boston private eye more content to sit around and lob gentle sallies at his psychologist lady love Susan Silverman (and marvel at the ones he gets in return)
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2001
The documentary "Women of Mystery: Three Writers Who Forever Changed Detective Fiction" will screen Monday at 7:30 p.m. in the James Bridges Theater, Melnitz Hall on the UCLA Campus. The film features crime novelists Marcia Muller, Sue Grafton and Sara Paretsky and follows them as they do research and share their processes of writing and living with their female protagonists.
BOOKS
July 12, 1992
As a big fan of Sue Grafton, it was nice to see her latest (" 'I' Is for Innocent") get both recognition and a good review in your May 10 issue. But what is this nonsense about the mystery field being "so overrun with women private eyes one can only marvel at the ingenuity of the authors and the tolerance of readers that keep them all gainfully employed"? I don't ever recall hearing the field was overrun by men before Grafton, Marcia Muller and Sara Peretsky started adding women to the genre.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You won't find Santa Teresa on a map of Southern California, but any reader of Sue Grafton's popular series of books featuring fiercely independent female private detective Kinsey Millhone can tell you where it is. It's a beachside town just north of Ventura County, with a university campus nearby, several luxury hotels, and the main drag is called State Street. Indeed, "Santa Teresa" sounds a lot like Santa Barbara.
BOOKS
March 13, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
The Sacramento Delta country, which seems underused in fiction but was the setting for Joan Didion's fine first novel "Run River" in 1963, becomes a well-evoked and dramatically atmospheric background for Marcia Muller's mystery thriller, Eye of the Storm. Muller's heroine, Sharon McCone, a private investigator for a San Francisco law firm, visits an island in the delta where her sister and brother-in-law are trying to convert an old mansion into a bed-and-breakfast.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1998 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Who among us has not sent off a letter to the editor opining about something? Wendy Dager, an expert on the greeting-card market whose work has also appeared in numerous journals, will explain how writers can make money from their opinions by getting published on op-ed pages in newspapers and magazines. Sponsored by the Ventura County Writers Club, the event is scheduled at 7:45 p.m. Tuesday in the Orchid Professional Building, 816 Camarillo Springs Road, Camarillo. Fee for nonmembers is $5.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1997 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the good old days of publishing, authors were concerned with getting a decent advance, being well reviewed and earning royalties. And, yes, they fantasized about a nibble from the movie people. However, in today's complicated publishing climate, agents or literary lawyers have to negotiate for film, television, electronic, foreign and product licensing rights on behalf of their authors.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The 21st annual Santa Barbara Writing Conference begins at 8 p.m. Friday, when Ray Bradbury fires up the writers (as he has done for years) with his passion for telling stories. The weeklong conference, which attracts people from all over the world and dozens of Ventura County writers, is held at the Miramar Hotel in Montecito. During the week, 27 workshop leaders and 27 guest lecturers--including agents, editors and major novelists--will share their expertise each day from 9 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1996 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
My favorite reading subjects as a youngster were history and biography. When confined to the house due to illness, I would ask my mother to get books from the library about real people and actual events. So in pursuit of real and true, I recommend local author Patricia Fry's history of the Ojai Valley School, "A Thread to Hold." And there is the just-published "The Mission Bells that Never Rang" a pictorial history of San Buenaventura Mission by Max Kurillo and E.M. Tuttle.
NEWS
June 25, 1988 | DENNIS McLELLAN
Special Deliverance: Elizabeth George was surprised to learn that her British detective novel, "A Great Deliverance," will be among the books featured in Newsweek magazine's annual Summer Mystery Roundup. The roundup will appear in the July 4 issue. "A Great Deliverance," George's first published novel, is the first in a series of British detective novels the Huntington Beach author is writing for Bantam Books.
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