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Marcine Shaw

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1994 | TRIN YARBOROUGH
Compton has undergone some rapid demographic changes in the last few decades, from mainly white to mainly African American to about evenly split between Latino and African American. Recent events, particularly the beating of a young Latino suspect by an African American police officer and the indictment of a former mayor on bribery charges, have made the region aware of the strains caused by these changes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1994 | TRIN YARBOROUGH
Compton has undergone some rapid demographic changes in the last few decades, from mainly white to mainly African American to about evenly split between Latino and African American. Recent events, particularly the beating of a young Latino suspect by an African American police officer and the indictment of a former mayor on bribery charges, have made the region aware of the strains caused by these changes.
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NEWS
March 21, 1993
Reporter Duke Helfand's excellent article on former Supervisor Kenny Hahn's senior deputy, Marcine Shaw ("Shaw Follows Hahn Into Retirement," March 7), stated: "Community leaders recall that Shaw and another Hahn aide stood guard at the Kenneth Hahn Plaza in Willowbrook on the first night of last spring's riots, fending off would-be looters until the National Guard arrived." For the record, that other aide was Brad Pye Jr., the supervisor's assistant chief deputy and currently a candidate for the Inglewood City Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1995
What the old Compton City Council generously gave itself, a newly seated council has taken away, rescinding a measure that would have resulted in a hefty pay raise. The City Council in May approved a government restructuring that could have added nearly $5,000 to each council member's $24,000 annual salary. The measure was approved less than a month after voters overwhelmingly denied the five-member council full-time status and a substantial raise.
NEWS
December 23, 1993
Catching Taggers, Litterbugs The City Council voted Tuesday to boost the amount of money offered to people who turn in taggers, and to include a reward for turning in litterbugs. The council unanimously passed an ordinance offering $1,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those who leave graffiti and illegally dump debris along the city's streets. Formerly, the city offered $250 for information leading to the conviction of a tagger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1993 | TINA GRIEGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Culminating a bitterly fought runoff campaign, Compton City Councilman Omar Bradley was elected mayor of Compton on Tuesday over Councilwoman Patricia A. Moore. Bradley, who had been favored to win, defeated Moore by 349 votes in a race that attracted fewer than 15% of the city's 35,000 registered voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1996
Coming from Compton made Monday's pop music endorsement all the more meaningful. Mayor Omar Bradley on Monday invited the rhythm and blues band Mint Condition to the de facto capital of gangsta rap to be honored for setting a good example. He said the lyrics of one of the group's pop hits, "What Kind of Man Would I Be?"--a song about marital fidelity--had struck him as a sign of hope in an industry infamous for its negative role models.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1990
Six people, including Los Angeles City Councilman Robert Farrell and former community colleges Trustee Marguerite Archie-Hudson, filed papers by Wednesday declaring their intent to run for the state Assembly seat held since 1976 by Democrat Maxine Waters. Waters announced recently that she will give up the 48th Assembly post to run for Congress. She hopes to succeed retiring U.S. Rep. Augustus Hawkins (D-Los Angeles).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Assemblyman Carl Washington announced Tuesday the formation of a community task force to ensure that the $2.4-billion Alameda Corridor project fulfills its promise to hire and train people who live in the economically depressed cities along the corridor's route. The number of jobs created by the new rail link to the county's ports and who gets hired to fill them have been major concerns for many residents and leaders from Wilmington to central Los Angeles.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | EMILY ADAMS
The public service group 100 Strong Men of Compton proved it has strong ties to City Hall recently when the organization won City Council approval to buy three used city vehicles for $1 each. The unprecedented deal drew support from Mayor Omar Bradley, founder and president of the group, and Councilman Ronald J. Green, a member of the group. Councilwoman Jane D. Robbins also voted for the proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2000
Surprising no one, Mayor Omar Bradley announced officially Thursday that he will seek a third term next spring. In a statement issued by the Compton city government, Bradley, at 42 the city's best-known and most polarizing political figure, said he wants to build on improvements in housing, budget and unemployment during his first eight years as mayor. "There are still a lot of issues we're in the middle of, such as some large economic development projects," he said. "I'd like to see them out."
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