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November 11, 2003 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Unable to prevent his cellphone from endlessly chirping the other afternoon, Marcus Nispel gave it the evil eye, as if he were about to heave it out the window. "All these phones are so complicated these days," he complained. "I really wish they would go back to making phones that just had a simple on-and-off switch." In the movie world, when you've directed a hit, your phone gets a good workout. As director of "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre," a $9.5-million horror film that has grossed $73.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2003 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Unable to prevent his cellphone from endlessly chirping the other afternoon, Marcus Nispel gave it the evil eye, as if he were about to heave it out the window. "All these phones are so complicated these days," he complained. "I really wish they would go back to making phones that just had a simple on-and-off switch." In the movie world, when you've directed a hit, your phone gets a good workout. As director of "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre," a $9.5-million horror film that has grossed $73.
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NEWS
January 19, 2003 | Richard Cromelin and Kevin Crust
Cabin Fever. David Lynch protege Eli Roth co-wrote and directed this popular 2002 Toronto Film Festival midnight flick about five friends who encounter a flesh-eating virus. Lions Gate, Summer Cursed. "Scream" team of director Wes Craven and writer Kevin Williamson reunites to reinvent the werewolf legend, setting it in Los Angeles. Dimension, Aug. 8 Darkness Falls. It's not very smart to offend the tooth fairy, because she can be scary after dark.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2009 | Mark Olsen
The team behind the latest installment in the "Friday the 13th" horror franchise has decided to reboot the series with a respectful nod to the mythology surrounding its iconic villain, the unspeaking, marauding killer Jason Voorhees -- who has, in previous outings, been sent to outer space, hell and/or New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
For those who have feverishly believed that what the world needs now is a remake of the 1974 horror movie "The Texas Chain Saw Massacre," may I suggest ... therapy. Barring some extensive time on the couch, however, anxious gore-hounds may want to redirect their expectations back to Tobe Hooper's original feature. That skin-crawling shocker about a chain-saw aficionado nicknamed "Leatherface" may not be one for the ages, but compared to the remake it's some kind of freaky classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2011 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Super 8 Paramount, $29.99; Blu-ray, $44.99 There hasn't been a Hollywood movie yet this year with a better first hour than "Super 8. " J.J. Abrams' sci-fi/actioner about teenage filmmakers in late-'70s Ohio understands how kids relate to each other and how much fun it can be to gather with friends and make something. All of this comes through in the early scenes of likable young folks shooting a zombie movie in and around their small town. "Super 8" loses some of its specialness in its second hour — when the amateur Spielbergs discover that an alien has been abducting their neighbors — but the spirit of camaraderie and youthful adventure never dims.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2007 | Michael Ordona, Special to The Times
"Pathfinder" is one of the funniest films of the year. That's not good news for this attempted action-adventure, which clearly lost its way in its own copious fog. The setup is good: One of the Viking expeditions to reach North America hundreds of years before Columbus leaves as its only survivor a 10-year-old boy. The child is raised by Indians, who call him "Ghost," either because of his pale skin or because they know the film will be haunted by cliches from a thousand other movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2006
Eight Below Paul Walker, Jason Biggs and Bruce Greenwood play members of an Antarctic research team who, after an accident, are forced to leave behind, then later attempt to rescue, their loyal sled dogs. A remake of a Japanese film based on an actual incident. Directed by Frank Marshall ("Alive"). Walt Disney Pictures, Feb. 17 * Eragon A young boy grows up to be a dragon rider and discovers he has the power to save or destroy an empire.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1999 | MARCUS NISPEL, Marcus Nispel is an award-winning director of more than 600 commercials and music videos and is currently on the roster of RSA-USA/Black Dog Films, which is owned and operated by Ridley and Tony Scott. He came to the U.S. on a Fulbright scholarship, and his work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art
Warren Berger's article on the major studios' seduction of TV commercial directors to do feature films ("The Ad Guys Take Charge," Sunday Calendar, July 25) misses the point of this mating dance. The studios are holding the door wide open for hot new commercial and video directors, except in many cases it's a trapdoor. Here's what the trapdoor looks like and sounds like: "All you gotta do is that first picture, comply, be a good boy and after that you can do what you want."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
Halloween is coming, and in advance of the candy corn, the monster known as Frankenstein's has become the subject of two very different TV movies. That luckless creature has been much abused since the "dreary night of November" when Victor Frankenstein, by unrevealed methods -- lightning is traditional, but there's no textual authority for it -- first made dead flesh live and live flesh crawl.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2002 | Michael Cieply, Times Staff Writer
Hollywood's big studios may soon dirty their hands in the fight over sanitized films. Eight major film companies are expected to file copyright infringement claims as early as today against CleanFlicks of Colorado and other firms that alter movies to remove scenes and language they deem offensive, according to people familiar with the studios' plans. The move will boost substantially the position of film directors, who have asked a federal court to stop the unauthorized editing.
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