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Margaret Lockwood

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December 12, 2011
A pair of new Blu-ray releases might make the perfect gifts for the cinephile on your list. Gary Cooper, Fredric March and Miriam Hopkins star in Ernst Lubitsch's "Design for Living," a pre-code comedy adapted from Noel Coward's play "Brief Encounter. " The 1933 classic centers on a beautiful commercial artist courted by a dashing painter (Cooper) and a dashing playwright (March) that she meets on a train trip to Paris. Another train-centered film fan favorite, Alfred Hitchcock's 1938 comic thriller "The Lady Vanishes," stars Margaret Lockwood as a woman traveling across Europe when she encounters a spinster (Dame May Whitty)
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2011
A pair of new Blu-ray releases might make the perfect gifts for the cinephile on your list. Gary Cooper, Fredric March and Miriam Hopkins star in Ernst Lubitsch's "Design for Living," a pre-code comedy adapted from Noel Coward's play "Brief Encounter. " The 1933 classic centers on a beautiful commercial artist courted by a dashing painter (Cooper) and a dashing playwright (March) that she meets on a train trip to Paris. Another train-centered film fan favorite, Alfred Hitchcock's 1938 comic thriller "The Lady Vanishes," stars Margaret Lockwood as a woman traveling across Europe when she encounters a spinster (Dame May Whitty)
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NEWS
July 17, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Margaret Lockwood, the calculatingly beautiful vixen featured in a variety of British films and who was named England's favorite movie star for three successive years in the mid-1940s, died Sunday. Miss Lockwood, the star of Alfred Hitchcock's 1938 classic "The Lady Vanishes" and other significant pictures of 50 years ago, was 73. The Associated Press and the British Press Assn. reported that she died at Cromwell Hospital in London.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Margaret Lockwood, the calculatingly beautiful vixen featured in a variety of British films and who was named England's favorite movie star for three successive years in the mid-1940s, died Sunday. Miss Lockwood, the star of Alfred Hitchcock's 1938 classic "The Lady Vanishes" and other significant pictures of 50 years ago, was 73. The Associated Press and the British Press Assn. reported that she died at Cromwell Hospital in London.
NEWS
February 27, 2003 | David C. Nichols
Belfast Blues: Writer-performer Geraldine Hughes' autobiographical reverie, though small-scaled, is thoroughly satisfying. Hughes, a pint-sized morph of Margaret Lockwood and Emily Watson, with more than a drop o' Lucille Ball, eschews the obvious in her account of growing up in war-torn Belfast and the American "fillum" role that changed her life. Hughes' technique, juggling multiple personas between stylized aspects of herself, is immaculate.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Though one of the pleasures of DVDs is the appearance in home format of films you know you love, it also can be exciting to come across films that sound as fascinating as they are unfamiliar. Two multi-disc packages fit that format this week. First is “Three Wicked Melodramas From Gainsborough Pictures,” released as part of Criterion's Eclipse Series. This trio of films - “The Man in Grey,” “Madonna of the Seven Moons” and “The Wicked Lady,” with stars such as James Mason, Margaret Lockwood, Stewart Granger and Phyllis Calvert - are all zesty costume melodramas that thrilled audiences in wartime and postwar Britain.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2003 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
A particular thrill accompanies the discovery of outstanding ability, and this sensation attends the Virtual Theatre Project presentation of "Belfast Blues" at the Black Dahlia Theatre. Writer-performer Geraldine Hughes' autobiographical reverie, though small-scaled, is thoroughly satisfying, the most elegant solo performance work seen locally since Tim Miller's "Body Blows."
NEWS
September 6, 1998 | Kevin Thomas
The Onion Field (ABC Monday at 9 p.m.) is the grueling, uneven but engrossing and deeply affecting 1979 film which Joseph Wambaugh adapted from his own nonfiction novel about a notorious, still-controversial cop-killing and its aftermath. James Woods is a thoroughly scary psychopath, and Franklyn Seales' stooge is an even more complex characterization. The picture is not the least of all a grimly convincing expose of a justice system that creates its own victims. John Savage co-stars.
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