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Margaret Mitchell

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1997
Regarding your May 17 article on Margaret Mitchell's apartment restoration: There are some of us old fogies left, having been young fogies at the time. Mitchell kept to herself mostly, but one day she ran into my mother, who lived in the same tiny apartment house, and asked her if she would like to "look over" her manuscript. Visiting Margaret's apartment, Mama silently gasped at the stack and promised to peruse. I have wondered all these years if the apartment still stood and if anybody cared.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Ann Rutherford, an actress whose small role as Scarlett's younger sister Carreen in the 1939 film "Gone With the Wind" was her most enduring, has died. She was 94. Rutherford, who also portrayed Mickey Rooney's teenage girlfriend in the Andy Hardy movies, died Monday evening at her home in Beverly Hills, said her close friend and fellow actress Anne Jeffreys. Rutherford had been in declining health with heart problems. As she became one of the last surviving cast members of "Gone With the Wind," Rutherford made a second career out of attending festivals featuring the beloved Civil War epic.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
They were Southern women who wrote novels about race, family and the destructive mores of their native land — so it makes sense that the "American Masters" documentaries about Margaret Mitchell and Harper Lee would run back to back Monday night. It also makes sense that neither of these films would break the two-hour mark — "Margaret Mitchell: An American Rebel" is 55 minutes, "Harper Lee: Hey, Boo" is 90 minutes — because these women shared another characteristic: Each wrote just one book.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012
'American Masters' Where: KOCE When: Margaret Mitchell: 9 p.m.; Harper Lee: 10 p.m. Monday Rating: TV-PG-L (may be unsuitable for young children with an advisory for coarse language)
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | Associated Press
A fire gutted the historic apartment house where Margaret Mitchell wrote most of "Gone With The Wind." Firefighters brought the blaze under control in about 90 minutes early Saturday. The cause of the fire was not immediately determined. Mitchell lived in a first-floor apartment with her husband from 1926 to 1932. She referred to the house as "the dump."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1996
Margaret Mitchell, a 61-year Ventura resident, died Tuesday after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease. She was 82. She was born April 10, 1914, in Raton, N. M. Mitchell lived in several western states and Canada before moving to Los Angeles, where she graduated from Los Angeles High School in 1931. She attended UCLA and Woodbury College, and married Thomas Mitchell on May 15, 1936, in Fullerton.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The apartment house where Margaret Mitchell began writing "Gone With the Wind" was extensively damaged by fire for the second time in two years, and investigators blamed arson. The three-story brick building in Atlanta was to be opened to the public June 30 after a $4.5-million restoration financed by Daimler-Benz, the German car maker. The midtown building was unoccupied, and no one was injured. Margaret Mitchell House Inc.
NEWS
April 25, 1994
Hugh Dorsey Gravitt, 74, whose car struck and killed author Margaret Mitchell. In August, 1949, the off-duty cabdriver struck Miss Mitchell as she walked with her husband, John Marsh, across Peachtree Street in downtown Atlanta. Five days later, the 48-year-old author of "Gone With the Wind" died. Gravitt was convicted of involuntary manslaughter and served about 10 months in prison. In a 1991 interview, he said that Miss Mitchell darted in front of his car and that he tried to miss her.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | Al Martinez
We will be judged someday by the way we treat our Margaret Mitchells. History will ponder our violence, our confusion and our inability to deal with those who need us most, and weigh them against the ultimate nature of our compassion. Looking back at who we are, future scholars will wonder how a culture so equipped and capable could reach into space but not into the hidden emotions of the human heart; how we could disarm a nation but not one person.
BOOKS
October 13, 1991 | Andrew Ferguson, Ferguson is an editoral writer for Scripps-Howard News Service
What we have here is not so much a novel as an artifact, less a work of the creative imagination than a contrivance of the vast American entertainment combine. Several years ago, as the world knows, the decision was made by Margaret Mitchell's two surviving nephews to allow a sequel to their aunt's book. Their purpose, the story goes, was to preserve the integrity of "Gone With the Wind" before the copyright lapsed and it became carrion for unscrupulous literary vultures.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
They were Southern women who wrote novels about race, family and the destructive mores of their native land — so it makes sense that the "American Masters" documentaries about Margaret Mitchell and Harper Lee would run back to back Monday night. It also makes sense that neither of these films would break the two-hour mark — "Margaret Mitchell: An American Rebel" is 55 minutes, "Harper Lee: Hey, Boo" is 90 minutes — because these women shared another characteristic: Each wrote just one book.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Ann Rutherford jokes that she hasn't earned "5 cents" since the 1970s, but she's still very much in the public eye because of "Gone With the Wind. " In the beloved 1939 Civil War epic she played Scarlett's ( Vivien Leigh) optimistic youngest sister Carreen. "If anybody told me that 71 years later they would prop me up and have me talk about 'Gone With the Wind' I would have believed it because the whole world was a fan of the book. " Rutherford, a peppy 89, almost didn't get the role of Carreen in the romantic drama that also starred Clark Gable as Rhett Butler.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Josie Walsh's "Gone With the Whim" shouldn't be looked at too closely. At the Ivar Theatre in Hollywood, this energetic two-act contemporary dance musical displayed so many problems of structure, narrative, characterization and tone on Saturday that it clearly reflected the philosophy that tomorrow is another day -- for rewrites.
OPINION
June 20, 2003
Re "Police Back Officer in '99 Killing," June 17: It was with great sadness that I learned that the Los Angeles Police Department found the actions of the officer who killed Margaret Mitchell justified. Mitchell died trying to protect her meager possessions, while the police officer was trying to protect the rights of the shopping cart owner. He knew or should have known that the victim was irrational, as a large percentage of the homeless are. It is confounding that the Police Commission, the police chief, the City Council, the federal overseer and the inspector general do not have the power or the will to correct this situation.
OPINION
June 17, 2003
Three years ago, the Los Angeles Police Commission ruled that an officer violated the Police Department's use-of-force policy when he shot and killed Margaret Mitchell, a 55-year-old mentally ill woman armed only with a large screwdriver. The City Council settled a lawsuit by Mitchell's family for nearly $1 million. End of story? If this were a new LAPD, perhaps.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | Al Martinez
We will be judged someday by the way we treat our Margaret Mitchells. History will ponder our violence, our confusion and our inability to deal with those who need us most, and weigh them against the ultimate nature of our compassion. Looking back at who we are, future scholars will wonder how a culture so equipped and capable could reach into space but not into the hidden emotions of the human heart; how we could disarm a nation but not one person.
BOOKS
October 13, 1991 | Rosemary Daniell, Daniell is the author of "Fatal Flowers: On Sin, Sex, and Suicide in the Deep South." Her forthcoming novel is from William Morrow
Arguably, the subject of "Southern Daughter: The Life of Margaret Mitchell" by Darden Asbury Pyron is as fascinating as Mitchell's famous heroine, Scarlett O'Hara. She was, for much of her life, what novelist Reynolds Price said of Southern women in general: "a Mack truck disguised as a powder puff." Margaret Mitchell was prey in the extreme to all the demons that afflicted Southern women of her time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2001
If Alice Randall wishes to "answer" Margaret Mitchell's "Gone With the Wind," she should turn her May 2 commentary ("The Wind Done Gone'--From the Scars to a Heart") into a book of essays addressing the very issues she raises. Under the 1st Amendment, she has every right to do so, and I would be first in line to buy a copy. However, under U.S. copyright law, she does not have the right to build a work based on characters, scenes and dialogue from Mitchell's novel. Interestingly, the bottom-line issue of copyright seems to be lost amid the cries of "free speech" and "censorship" from Randall's form-letter supporters.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Four advance copies of Alice Randall's "The Wind Done Gone" were pulled from the Internet auction site EBay, after bidding reached a high of $485 for one copy. U.S. District Judge Charles Pannell blocked publication of the book last week, ruling that Randall's work constituted "unabated piracy" of Margaret Mitchell's "Gone With the Wind" and could not be published. Martin Garbus, a lawyer for the Margaret Mitchell Trust, said he asked EBay to remove the books.
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