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Marge Schott

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1992
Marge Schott herself in the mouth. LEE LAVALLEE Hollywood
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SPORTS
March 26, 2006 | From the Associated Press
There are Reds uniforms and replica World Series trophies, autographed baseballs and leftover Beanie Babies, a Pete Rose jersey and thousands of packs of baseball cards. There's an old Max Venable bat, resting on the table next to a Sal Butera model. Somehow, a Ray Fosse model got mixed into the lot, even though he never played for the Reds. There are old Christmas cards, as well as pictures and posters of Schottzie the dog.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2004 | Elliott Teaford, Times Staff Writer
Marge Schott, the outspoken former owner of the Cincinnati Reds who was repeatedly suspended from major league baseball for racist statements, died Tuesday. She was 75. A chain smoker, Schott was hospitalized three weeks ago with breathing problems. She had suffered from lung problems in recent years. Christ Hospital in Cincinnati declined to release the cause of death. "On behalf of the entire Reds organization, we extend our deepest sympathies and condolences to the family of Mrs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2004 | Elliott Teaford, Times Staff Writer
Marge Schott, the outspoken former owner of the Cincinnati Reds who was repeatedly suspended from major league baseball for racist statements, died Tuesday. She was 75. A chain smoker, Schott was hospitalized three weeks ago with breathing problems. She had suffered from lung problems in recent years. Christ Hospital in Cincinnati declined to release the cause of death. "On behalf of the entire Reds organization, we extend our deepest sympathies and condolences to the family of Mrs.
SPORTS
May 12, 1996 | THOMAS BOSWELL, WASHINGTON POST
Last year the Cincinnati Reds had a party for some of their front-office personnel. The buffet was mostly cold cuts and white bread. Schottzie 2, the enormous drooling St. Bernard of team owner Marge Schott, started licking the bowl full of mayonnaise. "Marge," said the wife of one Red, "Schottzie's gotten into the food." "That's terrible," said Schott. "That's expensive mayonnaise." So, Schott got a knife, stirred the mayo until the evidence--three big doggie tongue prints--disappeared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1993 | GUY AOKI, Guy Aoki is co-founder and president of the Media Action Network for Asian - Americans. His opinions do not necessarily reflect the views of the Rafu Shimpo, an English-language paper published six days a week in Los Angeles for the Japanese-American community.
Most of the media is missing the point about Marge Schott by relating her ignorance/insensitivity/racism just to the world of professional baseball, which was earlier tainted by Al Campanis--the Los Angeles Dodger vice president who said in 1987 that blacks lacked "the necessities" for top-level positions in the business--and CBS sports analyst Jimmy the Greek--who in 1989 said that blacks were bred to be better athletes.
SPORTS
November 2, 1993 | From Associated Press
Marge Schott, the Cincinnati Reds' owner who had been suspended by major league baseball, showed her employees another side Monday on her first day back on the job. She cried. Schott was treated like a returning hero, not a chastised owner, when she drove up to her office at Riverfront Stadium for the first time in eight months. She hadn't been allowed inside during her suspension for using racial and ethnic slurs.
OPINION
December 6, 1992 | Neal Gabler, Neal Gabler, the author of "An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood"(Anchor/Doubleday), is working on a book about Walter Winchell
Call it an image problem. This week the solons of major-league baseball meet in Louisville, Ky., to determine the fate of Cincin nati Reds' owner Marge Schott, who has been accused of using racial and religious epithets and keeping a Nazi armband as a souvenir. The Schott affair is already a public-relations disaster for baseball. But for those of us who love the game, it is far more than a public-relations gaffe.
SPORTS
October 24, 1998 | From Associated Press
Marge Schott was forced to take the first step toward giving up control of the Cincinnati Reds, agreeing Friday to sell the team by the end of the year rather than face an indefinite suspension. Schott, often at odds with baseball officials over her inflammatory comments, has been under suspension since June 1996. The ban was due to expire Nov.
SPORTS
September 12, 1998 | From Associated Press
Mark McGwire went one for four with a single Friday night, remaining at 62 home runs in the St. Louis Cardinals' 8-2 loss to the Houston Astros before 52,186 at the Astrodome, the second-largest crowd in the stadium's history. McGwire, who has five homers against the Astros this year, is homerless in nine at-bats since hitting the record-breaking No. 62 off Chicago's Steve Trachsel Tuesday in St. Louis.
SPORTS
April 2, 1998 | Associated Press
Cincinnati owner Marge Schott fractured her hip when she fell in her driveway and underwent surgery Wednesday. The 69-year-old owner was injured Tuesday night, hours after her team lost its season opener, 10-2, to San Diego. An ambulance took Schott from her suburban Indian Hill home to Jewish Hospital Kenwood, a fire department spokesman said. "She fell in her driveway. It had been raining, it was slippery," said the spokesman said.
SPORTS
August 17, 1996
The American conscience is violated by Major League Baseball when it again allows Marge Schott back into baseball games while it continues to forbid Pete Rose's entry into the Hall of Fame. It was a lousy call. JOEL R. MALINIAK Los Angeles
SPORTS
July 29, 1996
Cincinnati Red owner Marge Schott returned to Riverfront Stadium on Sunday for the first time since being banned from her office, luxury box and field-level seat by major league baseball. Schott was on the field with her St. Bernard dog before the Reds' game with the New York Mets, talking with Reds players and their families. John Allen, the Reds' interim chief executive officer, said baseball had allowed a partial lifting of the ban.
SPORTS
July 18, 1996 | Associated Press
Now Marge Schott can't even go to Riverfront Stadium--unless she buys a ticket. Baseball officials, concerned she is interfering with the Cincinnati Reds' operations, banned Schott on Wednesday from entering her ballpark in the capacity of team owner. "There are several major issues that need to be addressed," National League President Len Coleman said at Wrigley Field, where he was watching the Cubs play Wednesday.
SPORTS
July 2, 1996 | SHAV GLICK
After Marge Schott was relieved of her duties as majority owner of the Cincinnati Reds for remarks about Adolf Hitler, New York Times columnist Russell Baker wrote that baseball and the German chancellor once had something in common: "Hitler became furious because a black American sprinter, Jesse Owens, beat the flower of Aryan athletes in the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Such an embarrassment could not have happened that year to major league baseball owners. "They simply didn't let blacks play."
SPORTS
June 28, 1996 | ROSS NEWHAN
The National League continues to monitor the Cincinnati Reds' operation but is not investigating whether Marge Schott has violated terms of the agreement by which she bowed out of the team's daily operation through 1998, said Ricky Clemons, a league spokesman. The Dayton Daily News, quoting unnamed team employees, said Schott has been meddling in team affairs and that the league was investigating.
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