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Marguerite Duras

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NEWS
March 4, 1996 | From Associated Press
Marguerite Duras, one of France's most famed and prolific writers, who became best known in recent years for her novel "The Lover" and the film based on it, died Sunday. She was 81. Duras, whose literary career spanned 50 years and 35 novels, died at her home in the Latin Quarter, according to parish authorities there.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds
The Sailor From Gibraltar A Novel Marguerite Duras, translated from the French by Barbara Bray Open Letter: 276 pp., $12.95 paper For many readers, the name Marguerite Duras is synonymous with smoky cafes and doomed love affairs. Sultry heat drives her characters to sex. This novel, first published in 1952 and made into a movie in 1967, is no exception. There's a little more raw daylight, since the narrator, in his utter boredom with work (copying birth and death certificates at the French Colonial Ministry)
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BOOKS
May 24, 1987 | Lynn Bundesen, Bundesen is a Santa Fe-based columnist
"Outside," a collection of Marguerite Duras' writings over the past 30 years for newspapers, magazines, art gallery notes and record jacket blurbs, is a book that redefines journalism. As Ernest Hemingway set the style for journalists in his time with his book "By Line," so Duras sets the tone for journalism in our times. No aspiring journalist, no school of journalism should be without this book.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2008 | Associated Press
An exiled Afghan writer won France's top literary prize Monday for his novel about the misery of a woman caring for a husband left brain-damaged by a war wound. Atiq Rahimi was awarded the Goncourt prize for "Syngue Sabour," Persian for "Stone of Patience," a title derived from a folk tale about a black stone that absorbs the distress of anyone who confides in it. The 105-year-old Prix Goncourt guarantees literary acclaim and high sales for the winning author. Past recipients include Marcel Proust, Simone de Beauvoir and Marguerite Duras.
BOOKS
May 13, 1990 | Sonja Bolle
The eminent French writer Marguerite Duras has had, since her earliest publications, fierce supporters and detractors. Admirers of her work will find in this collection of essays amplification and background thought to her fiction, but others are likely to consider the musings just another set of Gallic pronouncements.
BOOKS
April 30, 1989 | Trish Deitch Rohrer, Rohrer was most recently the fiction editor at Gentleman's Quarterly in New York. She's now a free-lance editor and writer in Los Angeles. and
"Emily L.," written by the acclaimed French writer Marguerite Duras and translated by Barbara Bray, is a short and odd experimental novel--a story within a story--about a French writer and her longtime lover who sit in a cafe in a port town off the Seine and imagine the life history of an aging English couple they've never met, who are sitting across the room from them getting unhappily drunk. By the end of the novel it seems clear that the story the French writer and her lover imagine is, in some way, the story of their own life together.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2008 | Associated Press
An exiled Afghan writer won France's top literary prize Monday for his novel about the misery of a woman caring for a husband left brain-damaged by a war wound. Atiq Rahimi was awarded the Goncourt prize for "Syngue Sabour," Persian for "Stone of Patience," a title derived from a folk tale about a black stone that absorbs the distress of anyone who confides in it. The 105-year-old Prix Goncourt guarantees literary acclaim and high sales for the winning author. Past recipients include Marcel Proust, Simone de Beauvoir and Marguerite Duras.
BOOKS
October 24, 1993 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
YANN ANDREA STEINER: A Memoir by Marguerite Duras. (Charles Scribner's Sons: $16; 128 pp.) When Marguerite Duras, author of "The Lover" and "Summer Rain," falls in love, people listen. This is the story of her love affair with Yann Andrea, "a sort of tall, thin Breton," a man 30 years her junior. She is recovering from alcoholism and depression and she is remembering. "For me," she writes, "writing was like weeping. A happy book was indecent, unseemly.
NEWS
April 7, 1986 | From Reuters
Marguerite Duras won the $50,000 Ritz Paris Hemingway Award today for "L'Amant," her intense, lyric novel about the love affair she had with a wealthy Chinese when she was 15 years old in French Indochina. Duras, 72, said the Hemingway prize meant more to her than the Prix Goncourt, France's top literary award that she won two years ago, because of its American connections and her "secret passion" for Hemingway.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds
The Sailor From Gibraltar A Novel Marguerite Duras, translated from the French by Barbara Bray Open Letter: 276 pp., $12.95 paper For many readers, the name Marguerite Duras is synonymous with smoky cafes and doomed love affairs. Sultry heat drives her characters to sex. This novel, first published in 1952 and made into a movie in 1967, is no exception. There's a little more raw daylight, since the narrator, in his utter boredom with work (copying birth and death certificates at the French Colonial Ministry)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
In 1975, when French writer Marguerite Duras attended a university screening of "India Song," one of 19 daunting experimental films she directed, a student, Yann Andrea Lemee, sat through it to ask for her autograph and permission to write to her. For the next five years he wrote Duras daily, sometimes as many as five times. In 1980 Duras invited him to visit her at her apartment in the coastal resort of Trouville, France.
NEWS
March 4, 1996 | From Associated Press
Marguerite Duras, one of France's most famed and prolific writers, who became best known in recent years for her novel "The Lover" and the film based on it, died Sunday. She was 81. Duras, whose literary career spanned 50 years and 35 novels, died at her home in the Latin Quarter, according to parish authorities there.
BOOKS
October 24, 1993 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
YANN ANDREA STEINER: A Memoir by Marguerite Duras. (Charles Scribner's Sons: $16; 128 pp.) When Marguerite Duras, author of "The Lover" and "Summer Rain," falls in love, people listen. This is the story of her love affair with Yann Andrea, "a sort of tall, thin Breton," a man 30 years her junior. She is recovering from alcoholism and depression and she is remembering. "For me," she writes, "writing was like weeping. A happy book was indecent, unseemly.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1992 | David Gritten
It's not uncommon for screenwriters to disown movies when they feel directors have failed to do their words justice. But Marguerite Duras, the eminent French novelist and screenwriter, has gone one better. She was so dismayed by the adaptation by director Jean-Jacques Annaud of her best-selling novel "L'Amant" (published in the United States as "The Lover") that she has written another version of the book in response to Annaud's movie.
BOOKS
January 12, 1992
Daniel Akst's column troubled me. Although it sounds as though he wrote it good-naturedly without intending to hurt anyone, I think he trivializes people's suffering by characterizing some conditions as "run-of-the-mill neuroses." Panic disorders, agoraphobias that keep people house-bound for years, depressions of various sorts, are all "neuroses" and all cause a great deal of pain and disability.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1992 | David Gritten
It's not uncommon for screenwriters to disown movies when they feel directors have failed to do their words justice. But Marguerite Duras, the eminent French novelist and screenwriter, has gone one better. She was so dismayed by the adaptation by director Jean-Jacques Annaud of her best-selling novel "L'Amant" (published in the United States as "The Lover") that she has written another version of the book in response to Annaud's movie.
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