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Maria Cantwell

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May 28, 2006 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
When Alaska's senior U.S. senator, 82-year-old Ted Stevens, came here on a speaking swing last month, the seven-term Republican issued what sounded like an extraordinary jeremiad against his Washington state colleague Maria Cantwell, a first-term Democrat who was all of 10 years old when Stevens started serving in the Senate. "I can't remember until these past few years any senator from your state who wasn't a close friend of mine," Stevens told chamber of commerce members in Tacoma.
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NATIONAL
May 28, 2006 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
When Alaska's senior U.S. senator, 82-year-old Ted Stevens, came here on a speaking swing last month, the seven-term Republican issued what sounded like an extraordinary jeremiad against his Washington state colleague Maria Cantwell, a first-term Democrat who was all of 10 years old when Stevens started serving in the Senate. "I can't remember until these past few years any senator from your state who wasn't a close friend of mine," Stevens told chamber of commerce members in Tacoma.
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NEWS
November 28, 2000 | From Associated Press
A recount began Monday in the closest Senate race in the country, with the outcome determining whether the chamber will be split 50-50 between Republicans and Democrats for the first time in a century. In totals released last week, Democrat Maria Cantwell, a dot-com millionaire, apparently defeated Republican Sen. Slade Gorton by 1,953 votes, or 0.08% of the 2.4 million ballots cast. Under Washington law, a recount is automatic when an election margin is less than 0.5%.
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | From Associated Press
A recount began Monday in the closest Senate race in the country, with the outcome determining whether the chamber will be split 50-50 between Republicans and Democrats for the first time in a century. In totals released last week, Democrat Maria Cantwell, a dot-com millionaire, apparently defeated Republican Sen. Slade Gorton by 1,953 votes, or 0.08% of the 2.4 million ballots cast. Under Washington law, a recount is automatic when an election margin is less than 0.5%.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democrat Maria Cantwell pulled narrowly ahead of GOP incumbent Slade Gorton on Tuesday in a race that could well leave the political balance in the U.S. Senate undetermined until after a recount. The contest had been all-but-decided in Gorton's favor last week, but Cantwell made a strong showing in late-counted ballots from Seattle; she also gained unexpected support in several Republican strongholds elsewhere in Washington.
NEWS
November 9, 2000 | Times Wire Services
Three races were too close to call Wednesday: * Florida: A recount was underway in the South Florida 22nd District congressional race between veteran GOP Rep. E. Clay Shaw and Democratic challenger Elaine Bloom. Shaw held a slim 614-vote lead. * New Jersey: Democratic Rep. Rush Holt had a 56-vote lead over Republican Dick Zimmer in the 12th District. A recount was considered likely. * Washington state: Republican Sen.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - The Senate confirmed Maria Contreras-Sweet, a former California official who founded a Los Angeles community bank, to head the federal Small Business Administration. Contreras-Sweet was approved Thursday by voice vote to the Cabinet position, which helps small businesses with loans and other assistance. She takes over for Karen Mills, a former venture capitalist who stepped down as the agency's administrator last year. President Obama said Contreras-Sweet "understands what it means to start a small business" and has "a proven track record of helping other small businesses succeed.
SPORTS
April 17, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Pat Riley, coach and president of the NBA-worst 15-67 Miami Heat, said Wednesday that he will decide after a meeting next week with owner Micky Arison whether he will return to the sidelines through the end of the 2009-10 season as he promised last summer. Riley, 63, became coach of the Heat for the second time 21 games into the 2005-06 season, leading the Heat to that season's NBA title.
NEWS
July 21, 1994 | From the Washington Post
The Clinton Administration retreated Wednesday from its efforts to control the method of scrambling private communications on the information superhighway when it said the federal standard will apply only to telephone conversations, not to computer exchanges. The announcement is a significant victory for the U.S. computer software industry.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Executive pay has become an issue in a U.S. Senate race. Emma Schwartzman, great-great-granddaughter of Safeco Corp. founder C.D. Stimson, on Tuesday sued the insurer's former chief executive, Michael McGavick, saying he wasn't entitled to as much as $28 million in severance pay when he quit last year to run for a Senate seat in Washington. The suit, which also names Safeco directors, was filed on behalf of Safeco shareholders in federal court in Seattle.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democrat Maria Cantwell pulled narrowly ahead of GOP incumbent Slade Gorton on Tuesday in a race that could well leave the political balance in the U.S. Senate undetermined until after a recount. The contest had been all-but-decided in Gorton's favor last week, but Cantwell made a strong showing in late-counted ballots from Seattle; she also gained unexpected support in several Republican strongholds elsewhere in Washington.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The chief executive of failed Washington Mutual Inc. and five other senior executives of the largest U.S. thrift, now owned by JPMorgan Chase & Co., are leaving their positions soon. In addition, employees were told they would be informed by Dec. 1 whether their jobs would continue -- which will be the case for most of the 43,000 employees -- or whether they would be moved to other jobs or see their positions eliminated, JPMorgan spokesman Tom Kelly said.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2012 | By Ronald D. White
The six senators representing the West Coast states of California, Oregon and Washington are sending a letter to U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. today, calling for an investigation into possible manipulation of the gasoline market by refineries that serve the region. In the letter the senators say an investigation is needed to determine whether false or misleading information was used to create a perception of a fuel supply shortage. That might have helped boost fuel prices, the senators say. In California, the price of a gallon of regular gasoline hit a new record of $4.671 a gallon last month.
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